1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)
  1. flipstarali New Member

    English
    Thanks
    You also might know the answer to this question:
    How do you say 'I didn't like it'
    Would it be Je ne l'ai aimé pas
    or
    Je n'ai l'aimé pas
    or something different
     
  2. thbruxelles Senior Member

    French - France
    je n'ai pas aimé ça
     
  3. flipstarali New Member

    English
    how can you put the pronoun it correctly though, do you know?
     
  4. tilt

    tilt Senior Member

    Nord-Isère, France
    French French
    Je ne l'ai pas aimé(e).

    Ça is not always the best translation for it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2009
  5. Welshleprechaun Junior Member

    English
    Using ça in this context is informal slang and not used in written language. If you want to be more formal, use the pronoun 'le': Je ne l'ai pas aimé.
     
  6. flipstarali New Member

    English
    Merci beaucoup
     
  7. itka Senior Member

    France
    français
    Les deux phrases ne sont pas équivalentes.
    Je n'ai pas aimé cela / Je n'ai pas aimé ça (not slang but colloquial and very idiomatic)
    Je n'ai pas aimé ce film / je ne l'ai pas aimé
     
  8. thbruxelles Senior Member

    French - France
    @welshleprechaum
    "Using ça in this context is informal slang and not used in written language. If you want to be more formal, use the pronoun 'le': Je ne l'ai pas aimé."

    Si on utilise ça (ou cela), on se réfère à quelque chose (pas quelqu'n).

    Je ne l'ai pas aimé se réfère à quelqu'un, une personne.

    Je n'ai pas aimé ça (ou cela) se rapporte à quelque chose (it). Je n'ai pas aimé la salade, je n'ai pas aimé ça. No in formal slang in it, you can write it.
     
  9. itka Senior Member

    France
    français
    I don't agree with you.
    This example I gave is perfectly correct though a movie is not a person :
    Je n'ai pas aimé ce film / je ne l'ai pas aimé

    Je n'ai pas aimé ça : je n'ai pas aimé cette chose = I didn't like this/that
    Je ne l'ai pas aimé(e) : can refer to a person or a thing = I didn't like it/him/(her)
     
  10. justbecrazy

    justbecrazy Junior Member

    Chinese-English
    Context: "I thought it (the film) would be good, but actually I didn't like it at all"

    La phrase : "I didn't like it at all"

    Je dois utiliser l'imparfait or le passe compose?

    Je ne l'aimais pas du tout ?
    Je ne l'ai pas aimé du tout?

    Merci!!
     
  11. Antonomase Junior Member

    Français - France
    "Je ne l'ai pas aimé du tout" est une opinion que tu as aujourd'hui à propos d'un événement passé.

    "je ne l'aimais pas du tout" se situe dans le passé : c'est l'opinion que tu as eu en regardant le film.

    Utiliser l'imparfait va insister sur le fait que c'est une opinion passée (peut-être pour dire qu'aujourd'hui tu as une autre opinion, ou pour expliquer un événement qui s'est produit par la suite).
    Utiliser le passé composé est plus factuel.
     
  12. Katniss Everdeen Senior Member

    English - Britain
    Hi
    I know this is really simple but I'm not sure whether when saying "I didn't like it" it is "je n'ai pas l'aimé" or does "l" go somewhere else.
    Thank you
     
  13. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Object pronouns come right before the verb (or the auxiliary if applicable as in your example).

    Je ne l'aime pas.
    Je ne l'ai pas aimé.

    That being said, depending on the context, you should rather say, Je n'ai pas aimé ça.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2013
  14. Katniss Everdeen Senior Member

    English - Britain
    The context is that I was was doing the same thing in the morning and in the afternoon at work experience and I didn't like it. So in this contect which way would be better?
     
  15. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Ça is then the right choice but the verb should probably be in the imperfect:

    Je n'aimais pas ça.
     
  16. Katniss Everdeen Senior Member

    English - Britain
    Does it have to be imperfect or would passe composé be alright?
     
  17. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    It all depends on the full context, which is still not quite clear. Are you talking about a habitual work day or a single day? In the former case, you must definitely use the imperfect; in the latter, you should use the passé composé.
     
  18. Katniss Everdeen Senior Member

    English - Britain
    I'm talking about just one day so should it be passé composé?
     

Share This Page