FR: J'aime que les chats / Je n'aime que les chats

Discussion in 'French and English Grammar / Grammaire française et anglaise' started by EpicBacon, Feb 4, 2013.

  1. EpicBacon

    EpicBacon Senior Member

    Oregon
    North American Anglophone English
    So, as we know, the "ne" is almost always dropped in conversational French. This is fine, I actually usually prefer it that way as a native English speaker since there's no proper translation for that word.

    "Je peux plus" sort of confuses me, because to me, it seems like it should mean, "I can still". Comment est-ce qu'on dit cela en francais ? :O However, I understand it means, regardless, "Je can no longer"

    Now, I wonder about dropping the "ne" (in informal conversation) when it's followed by a que. Est-ce qu'on peut dire, "J'aime que les chats !" ? Ou "Je veux que danser avec un corps mort !" ?

    J'ai entendu les deux. That you can say it and that you can't as well. So, educated individuals who speak French far better than me: What is it?

    Merci beaucoup !
     
  2. atcheque

    atcheque mod errant

    Česko - Morava
    français (France)
     
  3. Transfer_02 Senior Member

    Espoo, Finland
    English - British
    I can still.... -> Je peux encore courir 10 kms en moins d'une heure.

    "J'aime que les chats."

    "Je travaille que 4 jours par semaine."

    "Je porte que des jeans, jamais une jupe."

    They sound OK to me...
     
  4. Rainbow-Road New Member

    Troyes (France)
    French - France
    « J'aime que les chats » = OK in informal French (proper form is « Je n'aime que les chats »).

    « Je veux que danser avec un corps mort ! » does not make any sense. What are you trying to say?

    I don't see what is the problem with « Je peux plus » because Je ne peux plus and I can no longer are quite similar.
     
  5. EpicBacon

    EpicBacon Senior Member

    Oregon
    North American Anglophone English

    In my head, "Je veux que danser avec un corps mort !" means "I just want to dance with a dead body!" Would it make more sense if I were to say, "Je ne veux que danser avec un corps mort !"?

    The problem with "je peux plus" to mean "I can no longer" is because "plus" is such a positive word and, to me, it's confusing to use it in a negative sentence without anything supporting it. In English, there is the, "I can no, "longer", which makes it easier.
     
  6. Lly4n4 Senior Member

    Paris (ex-Grand Ouest)
    Français (France)
    As Atcheque has already explained, there is no possible confusion.
    Either you heard it / tell it, and in this case the sound at the end of "plus" is enphasized: J'en veux plus ([plussss]) = I want more! / J'en veux plus ([plu]) = I don't want it anymore.

    Or, if "plus" is written, you must use the correct form, that is "Je n'en veux plus" = no more / "J'en veux plus" = more.
    However, if it is badly written French, use the context to understand - or rephrase it :)

    PS: "plus" has a positive meaning, but "longer" too :)
     
  7. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
  8. EpicBacon

    EpicBacon Senior Member

    Oregon
    North American Anglophone English
    So, please, tell me, a simple yes or no: is the "ne" commonly dropped in spoken French if it's followed by "que"?
     
  9. Oddmania

    Oddmania Senior Member

    France
    French
    Hi,

    I think that the ne is commonly dropped in spoken French in prettty much any situation! :) It's informal, though.

    J'aime que les poivrons rouges et jaunes, pas les verts.
    Fais pas ça! (instead of Ne fais pas ça!)
    ...

    Now, keep in mind that juste sometimes sounds more natural than que in front of a verb. If you're really willing to dance with a dead body (maybe you've been watching Tim Burton's Corpse Bride too many times!), I suggest you say Je veux juste danser avec un mort.

    For instance, Je (ne) veux que dormir un peu sounds quite awkward to me, I'd rather say Je veux juste dormir un peu instead.
    Note that no ne is required with juste, whether it is written or spoken French.
     
  10. EpicBacon

    EpicBacon Senior Member

    Oregon
    North American Anglophone English
    Then, if I may ask, why did "Je veux que danser avec un corps mort !" make no sense? o_O
     
  11. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Actually, that sentence makes sense grammatically (the omission of the ne being just colloquial as mentioned above), but its meaning is pretty unusual, whether or not you include the ne. Saying, "I want only dance with a corpse" is weird to say the least, isn't it? (I hope you agree, otherwise please remind me never to discuss with you again. :D)
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2013
  12. EpicBacon

    EpicBacon Senior Member

    Oregon
    North American Anglophone English
    I suppose, one could say, that dancing with dead bodies is possibly,a tad, slightly bizarre... However, I like those sentences because they really get to the core of the point of the question. :)
     

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