FR: lequel / (celui/ce) qui/que - "which" w/o any preposition

Discussion in 'French and English Grammar / Grammaire française et anglaise' started by afro*sol, Jul 25, 2011.

  1. afro*sol New Member

    English
    I am trying to distinguish whether to use lesquelles vs. celles qui to replace the noun expériences in the following phrase:


    Ce travail m'a permis de réaliser la valeur de mes expériences précédentes dans le volontariat, (lesquelles)/(celles qui) m'a préparées à relever les défis de mon travail dans une situation d'urgence tout en soutenant une grande équipe de bénévoles.

    I am leaning towards lesquelles but can't justify why!

    Moderator note: multiple threads merged to create this one
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2014
  2. tilt

    tilt Senior Member

    Nord-Isère, France
    French French
    En écrivant celles qui, tu suggères que seulement certaines tes expériences dans le volontariat t'ont préparé à relever les défis que tu mentionnes.

    Comme j'imagine que tu veux dire que toutes tes expériences t'y ont préparé, il faut effectivement préférer lesquelles.
    Note que tu pourrais également écrire simplement qui m'ont préparé...
     
  3. afro*sol New Member

    English
    Merci tilt.

    Est-ce qu'il y a une forme ecrit qui fait plus de sense?

    ...mes expériences...., lesquellesm'ont préparé ...
    ...mes expériences...., quim'ont préparé ...

    ?
     
  4. tilt

    tilt Senior Member

    Nord-Isère, France
    French French
    Je mettrais lesquelles, mais c'est à mon tour d'avoir un peu de mal à me justifier ! :p
    Il me semble que ce pronom met davantage en relief le nom qu'il remplace, or ta phrase veut de toute évidence donner de l'importance à tes expériences passées.
     
  5. jann

    jann co-mod'

    English - USA
    I may be mistaken, but I believe the comma precludes use of qui. The sequence [mes expériences qui m'ont préparé(e)] needs to act as a unit. If you want to divide the unit, by putting a comma after expériences, you change both the meaning and the grammar, and qui is no longer possible.

    Compare:

    Ce travail m'a permis de comprendre la valeur de...

    1. mes expériences précédentes dans le volontariat, lesquelles m'ont préparé(e) à...
    2. mes expériences précédentes dans le volontariat, celles qui m'ont préparé(e) à...
    3. mes expériences précédentes dans le volontariat qui m'ont préparé(e) à...
    4. mes expériences précédentes dans le volontariat, ce qui m'a préparé(e) à...

    This work has allowed me to realize the value of...
    1. my previous volunteer experiences, which have collectively prepared me for...
      (What have you learned to value? All of your previous volunteer experiences. And what prepared you? All of your previous volunteer experiences.)
    2. my previous volunteer experiences, (specifically) those which prepared me for...
      (What have you learned to value? All of your previous volunteer experiences, you imply. And what prepared you? Some but not all of your previous volunteer experiences. Not the most well-constructed sentence...)
    3. my previous volunteer experiences that prepared me for...
      (What have you learned to value? You've learned to value the previous volunteer experiences that prepared you for the current challenge.)
    4. my previous volunteer experiences, which has prepared me for...
      (What have you learned to value? All of your previous volunteer experiences. And what prepared you? Recognizing the value of those previous volunteer experiences has prepared you for the current challenge.)
    Obviously the four meanings are quite different.

    Note that you will only include the final E on préparé(e) if you are female.
     
  6. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Please don't use sentence #2. It is definitely badly constructed.

    As far as I'm concerned, the most natural sentence is #3:

    mes expériences précédentes dans le volontariat qui m'ont préparé à…
     
  7. gardian

    gardian Senior Member

    Ireland
    English - Ireland
    My little French grammar says that lequel/laquelle etc as relative pronouns are only used after a preposition, i.e.

    1) When using entre and parmi and referring to people objects ;

    And (2) When referring to thing objects after any preposition.


    Yet occasionally you see lequel/laquelle simply employed as a translation of the English relative pronoun, which . . .

    For example, the English sentence like :

    I have a great capacity for adapting to and managing change which I've gained from my experiences abroad as well as in the workplace.

    was translated as :

    J'ai une grande capacité pour m'adapter et gérer le changement (organisationnel/commercial), laquelle j'ai acquise d'après mes expériences à l'étranger et au lieu de travail.

    without any question on this use of laquelle.

    According to my reading of French grammar, the correct relative pronoun in the last clause ought be simple que and not laquelle.



    Can someone please provide me with the grammatical legislation for laquelle (ON ITS OWN, NOT WITH PREPOSITIONS!) ?
     
  8. Moon Palace

    Moon Palace Senior Member

    Lyon
    French
    According to my French grammar, it is not correct and should be que, as you were saying. Laquelle / Lequel can be used as relative pronouns, most often as subjects, and my grammar says that when it is too far away from the noun it refers to, it should automatically be replaced with que / qui.
    Other examples of laquelle without a preposition:
    Ne vois-tu pas le sang, lequel dégoutte à force (Ronsard)
    Apart from this, lequel / laquelle is often used in administrative or judiciary contexts (un voisin de la victime a été entendu, lequel a affirmé... / une enquête a été menée, laquelle a révélé...)
     
  9. CapnPrep Senior Member

    France
    AmE
    You are correct, and your little French grammar is incomplete. You might consider acquiring a bigger one.
    As far as I know, the proper use of this pronoun has not yet been the subject of legislation… In the meantime, you can have a look in the dictionary, e.g. the TLF. You will find that while lequel can be used as a relative pronoun "ON ITS OWN, NOT WITH PREPOSITIONS!", this usage is usually restricted to formal, written French, and it is more common for lequel to refer to the subject of the relative clause (i.e. lequel used instead of qui) than for the direct object (lequel used instead of que, as in your example).

    See also:
    FR: which I would like to take
    FR: préposition + qui / lequel
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2012
  10. gardian

    gardian Senior Member

    Ireland
    English - Ireland
    I see.

    So it still exists in some instances where its use imitates a quaint construction, like in English we might say in certain official context words like whomsoever, heretofore, whereas, etc ?
     
  11. gardian

    gardian Senior Member

    Ireland
    English - Ireland
    Okay.

    So if I was to translate a sentence (please excuse the Friday afternoon fantasy context!) like :

    A heavenly smile came from the desk by the east door at the Hotel Murat, which sprung from the soul of a Moroccan receptionist I'd met on my last visit.

    I could do so by :

    Un sourire des cieux me vint de la réception à la porte d'est de l'Hotel Murat, lequel provint de l'âme d'une réceptionniste marocaine que j'ai rencontrée à ma visite précédente ???
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012
  12. geostan

    geostan Senior Member

    English Canada
    That's odd. I would have thought the reverse, that is, when the antecedent is rather far from the relative pronoun, lequel would be more likely, especially as it permits the identification of gender and number. However, I am no authority on this.

    Cheers!
     
  13. L'Inconnu Senior Member

    US
    English
    Two sentences would be easier to write and less confusing to the reader.

    ''Un sourire des cieux me vint de la réception à la porte d'est de l'Hotel Murat.''
    ''Ce sourire-là provint de l'âme d'une réceptionniste marocaine que j'ai rencontrée à ma visite précédente.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012
  14. gardian

    gardian Senior Member

    Ireland
    English - Ireland
    You missed the entire point of the post, Inconnu -- which was to "trial" a use of lequel as a relative pronoun, used without any preposition, in a translation of a suitable sentence.
     
  15. L'Inconnu Senior Member

    US
    English
    Fine. So long as we use a simple sentence.

    "Un sourire qui provient d'une réceptionniste marocaine."

    J'ai une grande capacité pour m'adapter, que j'ai acquise d'après mes expériences à l'étranger et au lieu de travail.

    Initially, I assumed that the use of <laquelle> in the above sentence was a syntax error. Now, I realize that centuries ago <laquelle> was used in sentences where today we use <qui>. If such a usage is outdated (vieilli.) I still have no idea why we should use it today.

    Ok, it seems to me that it would be useful to replace <qui>/<que> with <lequel>/<laquelle> in some cases, where I would want/need to specify gender. But this idea doesn't apply to any of the two examples you brought.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2012
  16. geostan

    geostan Senior Member

    English Canada
    Here is a link to the Banque de dépannage linguistique, which talks about lequel as a relative pronoun.
     
  17. gardian

    gardian Senior Member

    Ireland
    English - Ireland
    You better read the whole thread from the start, Inconnu.

    My trial example of lequel was in response to the initial suggestions for legitimate use of lequel on its own.
    I was hoping for a response from posters, Moon Palace & CapnPrep, on whether my example was acceptable or not.

    Your suggested justification for using lequel/laquelle instead of qui/que so as to indicate gender seems a bit spurious.
    If there is such a real need to specify the gender, it is likely that it would be done in a less implicit way.
    And I doubt that a whole new usage of a French relative pronoun was developed simply to enable such an implied distinction to be facilitated.

    Anyhow, I thank you and all the other posters for helping me conceptualise this pesky issue.
     
  18. L'Inconnu Senior Member

    US
    English
    Ok, let's review what I think I understood.

    1) You read a sentence written in French, and you are surprised to find <laquelle> where you expect <que> belongs. As you already know, <lequel> is a relative pronoun used to replace a noun that is the object of a preposition, but this is not the case in your example.

    2) You are told that indeed you are correct, the writer should have used <que>. Interestingly, centuries ago French writers used to use <laquelle>/<lequel> where today they use <qui> to replace a noun that is not the object of a prepostion. However, there is no current standard for this usage of <lequel>.

    This is the part where I come in. I asked myself why would anyone want to use <lequel> in place of <qui>, or <que> for that matter? In either case, what advantage would it offer? In answer to my own question, <lequel>/<laquelle>/<lesquels>, etc would allow you to specify quantity or gender. But, on the other hand, using it in a non-standardized fashion might confuse people, including native French speakers.

    Has it finally occurred to you that the root of your confusion in this matter is simply due to the fact such a usage of <lequel> is archaic? Now that I come to think about it, what use would it be to specify number and gender, if I already know the noun(s) that a relative pronoun replaces in the first place? So my vote is <no> for <lequel> in place of <qui>.

    Now comes the bet. I betcha lots of native French speakers would agree with me!
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2012
  19. gardian

    gardian Senior Member

    Ireland
    English - Ireland
    Oh, let's leave the betting out of all this.
    It's supposed to be a forum where people freely contribute their knowledge of language to one another on a common-good-leads-to-individual-benefit basis.
    The betting takes the real enjoyment out of things.
    And, besides, we're all getting enough risk from our lives in the present world.
     
  20. L'Inconnu Senior Member

    US
    English
    This reference?

    ->A. - Vieilli. [En dehors de l'emploi prép., le pron. rel. introduit toujours une prop. rel. explicative et remplace facultativement qui (plus rarement que)]<-

    That's why I got the impression that it's archaic. But, admittedly, there are plenty of archaic English terms or expressions that are still in current use.
    Yes, it does look appositive to me. That is to say, a parenthetic phrase that qualifies a noun. And, when such a phrase becomes rather lengthy, you would want a special way to clarify it. But does switching from <qui> to <lequel> help in this case or does it simply lead to more confusion? Wouldn't be easier to write two sentences instead of one?
     
  21. Moon Palace

    Moon Palace Senior Member

    Lyon
    French
    When the antecedent is far from the pronoun, we would (should) repeat the antecedent, not change for another pronoun.
    E.g. J'ai une grande capacité pour m'adapter et gérer le changement (organisationnel/commercial), capacité que j'ai acquise...
     
  22. CapnPrep Senior Member

    France
    AmE
    The indication "Vieilli" in the TLF covers a lot of ground, but I would say that it corresponds more to "old-fashioned" than to "archaic" (for which they have other indications like "arch." and "Vx."). Anyway, as gardian has discovered, it is pretty easy to come across lequel as a relative pronoun without a preposition, so I think that it's something advanced learners should be aware of.
     
  23. Nanoubix Junior Member

    France, French
    Is Alain Badiou archaic ? I concede he is over 75 and a rather old-fashioned marxist intellectual but I would still take him as an authority in the French language.

    Here's what he wrote a few weeks ago in Le Monde:

    'Comme toujours, l'idée, fût-elle criminelle, précède le pouvoir qui à son tour façonne l'opinion dont il a besoin. L'intellectuel, fût-il déplorable, précède le ministre, qui construit ses suiveurs. Le livre, fût-il à jeter, vient avant l'image propagandiste, laquelle égare au lieu d'instruire.'
     
  24. gardian

    gardian Senior Member

    Ireland
    English - Ireland
    Peut-être c'est aujourd'hui un mot d'élégance, un mot de caresse parmi les intellectuels ?
     
  25. Nanoubix Junior Member

    France, French
    Tout-à-fait.

    Voilà ce que dit ma grammaire :

    En fonction de sujet, lequel équivaut à qui. Il ne s’emploie que dans une proposition relative explicative; c’est pourquoi il est toujours précédé d’une virgule et jamais de la conjonction et. Cet emploi de lequel en fonction de sujet relève surtout de la langue soignée. Il permet parfois aussi d’éviter une équivoque ou de répéter le pronom relatif qui.

    Exemples :
    - Il faudra refaire un des murs de la maison, laquelle vient tout juste d’être entièrement rénovée.
    - Les auteurs de la fusillade qui a coûté la vie à un policier de Québec, lequel est décédé ce matin à l’hôpital, sont toujours recherchés.
    - Christine s’est enfin acheté la voiture qu’elle désirait tant et qui coûtait si cher. (et non : Christine s’est enfin acheté la voiture qu’elle désirait tant et laquelle coûtait si cher.)
     
  26. Chimel Senior Member

    Belgium
    Français
    Un petit détail, qui n'est pas sans importance: dans ce type d'usage, lequel/laquelle est presque toujours séparé de son antécédent par une virgule. On le voit bien dans l'exemple cité par Nanoubix, par opposition au relatif "qui à son tour façonne...", sans virgule, dans la première partie de la citation.

    Cela m'amène à dire que, dans ce cas, l'auteur veut introduire une sorte de pause, avant de relancer la phrase avec la relative, qui se trouve ainsi davantage mise en évidence (avec aussi un effet de style lié à l'usage d'un relatif moins courant).

    Parfois aussi, on le fait parce que l'antécédent est situé relativement loin du relatif. L'effet de renforcement produit par la virgule et lequel/laquelle compense alors cet éloignement. "J'ai parlé avec une proche conseillère du nouveau ministre de la Justice, laquelle m'a dit que..." (de plus, "laquelle" au féminin permet ici de faire comprendre qu'il s'agit de la conseillère alors que "qui" serait plus ambigu).

    NB: Nanoubix a posté entre-temps et dit grosso modo la même chose que moi... ;)
     
  27. Nanoubix Junior Member

    France, French
    Oui, je suis d'accord avec Chimel.

    De plus, et j'aurais dû le préciser, l'utilisation que Badiou fait de 'laquelle' est aussi une manière d'éviter une confusion entre 'le livre' et 'l'image propagandiste' qui 'égare au lieu d'instruire'.
     
  28. rajahbeloof Senior Member

    English
    Bonjour, je viens de découvrir quelque chose de bizarre. En recherchent le mot « lequel », j’ai vu une entrée qu’a déclaré que ce mot peut faire office de la conjonction relatif « ce qui ». Cependant je ne peux pas faire une distinction entre une situation où il faudrait utiliser « lequel » et une situation où il faudrait utiliser « ce qui ».
    Par exemple :
    Il a tué ma sœur, ce qui était la raison pour laquelle je l’ai arrêté.
    ou
    Il a tué ma sœur, lequel était la raison pour laquelle je l’ai arrêté.

    L’exemple que le dictionnaire a donné était :
    Cette pièce est vissée au montant, lequel est lui-même solidement fixé au mur.
    Serait-il possible d’écrire « ce qui est lui-même…au mur. » ?
    De plus, n’avez-vous pas peur de corriger mon français. J’espère que j’aie bien écrit ce message.
     
  29. Finland Senior Member

    Finland
    finnois
    Bonjour !

    "Cette pièce est vissée au montant, ce qui est lui-même..." ne serait pas possible, car "ce qui" se réfère à toute la phrase qui précède, tandis qu'ici il faut se référer au mot "montant". Par contre, on pourrait utiliser tout simplement "qui" au lieu de "lequel". Lequel est plus emphatique.

    J'espère vous avoir aidé(e) !

    S
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2012
  30. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Finland a raison.

    Il a tué ma sœur, ce qui était la raison pour laquelle je l'ai arrêté.
    Il avait acheté des œufs, ce qui lui a permis de faire un gâteau.

    Cette pièce est vissée au montant, lequel est lui-même solidement fixé au mur. = Cette pièce est vissée au montant qui est lui-même solidement fixé au mur.
    Il a tué ma sœur, laquelle était encore jeune. = Il a tué ma sœur qui était encore jeune.


    Cela dit, la première phrase n'est pas du tout naturelle. On dira plutôt : Il a tué ma sœur, raison pour laquelle je l'ai arrêté.
     
  31. rajahbeloof Senior Member

    English
    Je vous remercie de m'avoir aidé, et je comprends tout ce que vous avez écrit :D
     
  32. trickyvic Senior Member

    London
    English
    Hello,

    I still can't get my head around when to use lequel/laquelle instead of que. The sentences below are from here:

    « En résulte une accumulation anormale ou excessive de graisse corporelle laquelle peut nuire gravement à la santé. »

    « Les excès de l’alimentation font donc davantage de ravages arithmétiquement parlant que le scandale de la faim dans le monde lequel concerne un peu plus de 950 000 000 d’hommes, de femmes et enfants sur terre. »

    If I'd been writing these sentences I know I would have used que, which is clearly incorrect. Is there a simple explanation for the use of lequel/laquelle in these sentences?
     
  33. OLN

    OLN Senior Member

    Alsace, France
    French - France, ♀
    Bonjour, trickyvic.

    Il faut normalement faire précéder le pronom d'une virgule, dans des phrases aussi longues et lourdes.

    1.- Le pronom laquelle (= l'accumulation ...) est sujet du verbe pouvoir nuire. L'autre pronom possible, bien plus naturel, est donc qui, pas que.

    2.-lequel (= le scandale de ...) est sujet de concerner. Idem.

    P.S: On n'écrit normalement pas "950 000 000 de," mais "950 millions de".
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2015
  34. trickyvic Senior Member

    London
    English
    Merci OLN. Donc, on pourrait utilisier "qui" au lieu de "lequel/laquelle" là ?
     
  35. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Du point de vue du sens le plus logique, oui, mais d'un point de vue strictement grammatical, c'est graisse corporelle que reprend laquelle

    Oui, et ce serait même beaucoup plus naturel avec qui dans la première phrase comme l'a déjà relevé OLN. Dans la seconde, utiliser lequel au lieu de qui permet de clarifier l'antécédent parce qu'il ne peut être que masculin singulier. En d'autres termes, utiliser qui serait plus ambigü.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2015
  36. trickyvic Senior Member

    London
    English
    Merci beaucoup !
     

Share This Page