1. semiller Senior Member

    Dallas, Texas
    USA-English
    Moderator note: multiple threads merged to create this one.

    Most of the time I have seen "merci pour" used on this forum, as in "Merci bien pour votre aide." Are there certain cases where it is better to use "merci de?" Merci bien pour votre réponse. ;)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 28, 2009
  2. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Hmmm It's always merci pour something physical eg "merci pour ta lettre". Otherwise I think it's merci de. I would have written "merci de votre réponse", Merci pour votre réponse sounds colloquial to my non-native ear. Let's see if our native friends agree.:)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  3. Brigitte Junior Member

    France
    I think we say "merci pour" when a name follows, and "merci de" when you a verb follows.

    For example, "merci pour ton aide" and "merci de m'avoir aidé", "merci pour hier" et "merci d'être venu hier".
     
  4. Jabote Senior Member

    Mirabel, Quebec, Canada
    French from France
    You've got it Brigitte, except that you can also say merci de + a noun, as in merci de votre réponse (unless this is faulty, in which case I've been faulty quite a few times in my life...)... ;o)))
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  5. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Yes it's always de before a verb, but in terms of a noun, isn't merci pour votre réponse colloquial?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  6. Brigitte Junior Member

    France

    I must say I'm at a loss here. Both sentences are correct, with maybe the begining a shade of difference in the meaning...

    You know what? I'm happy to have learnt French as mother tongue :D !
     
  7. Jabote Senior Member

    Mirabel, Quebec, Canada
    French from France
    I don't think so tim, I think it is quite correct, but I also think that de votre réponse is correct as well.... I'm not sure either way in fact ! Sad to say but ....
     
  8. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    What is the shade of difference in their meaning?
     
  9. Brigitte Junior Member

    France
    Well, I think I would use "merci de votre réponse" if I intended to carry on the subject (such as asking something else or explaining at length how the answer was useful), and "merci pour votre réponse" if the matter stopped here, but it's really tenuous.
     
  10. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    That's really interesting. Can you extend the example to a different context. The nuance between the two might become more apparent then.

    For example "merci de ta générosité" or "merci pour ta générosité".

    A different one "merci de votre compréhension" or "merci pour votre compréhension".

    Sorry to nag, but I'd love to know how this is working.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  11. Brigitte Junior Member

    France
    bbrrrmmmlllffff :confused:

    I think I would say: "merci de ta générosité" in a rather formal context, then I would add something like "cela m'a vraiment aidé". "merci pour ta générosité" sounds warmer and I would rather use it with a friend.


    "merci de votre compréhension" : I would rather use it when asking something, as a conclusion after having explained why this something should be done. "merci pour votre comprehension would rather conclude a thank-you letter to someone who received the first letter and acted accordingly.

    But once again, it's really tenuous. Maybe another native French speaker would have a better idea?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  12. semiller Senior Member

    Dallas, Texas
    USA-English
    Although I'm not a native speaker, I would venture to say (based on timeless observation) that while "merci pour un nom" or "merci de un nom" are equally correct, but the tendency to me seems to be that "merci pour" is used more often than not. Yes, "de" would always follow a verb. Exemple: Merci encore d' avoir répondu. C'était un phénomème de langue francaise qui m'a toujours embrouillé.
     
  13. Jabote Senior Member

    Mirabel, Quebec, Canada
    French from France
    En ce qui me concerne, je ne peux pas dire que ça m'embrouille, j'ai toujours utilisé les deux avec un nom sans me poser de question, mais il se peut fort bien que je me sois toujours fourvoyée dans l'un des cas !!!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  14. fetchezlavache

    fetchezlavache Senior Member

    metz, france
    france
    i fully agree with this nuance.

    'merci de', without being 100 % formal, is higher register than 'merci pour', the latter not being colloquial <pokes tim whilst hanging him a handkerchief> ;)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  15. Krzys New Member

    France
    About the nuance between "Merci de"/"Merci pour":

    I think I would say "Merci pour ton aide" after the fact (after helping me do someting, resolve some issue) to express my gratitude, and "Merci de ton aide" or "Merci de me répondre" if i am expecting some help or something from the person.

    It can be stronger than a simple request : "Merci de bien vouloir ..." = polite form of "Do this, or else ... !" :)
     
  16. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Thanks for your help but we've already established that de is always used before a verb. We'd like to know the difference in nuance between the choice of de and pour before the same noun.

    Also preferably not in a case by case basis, but as a generalisation.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  17. LV4-26

    LV4-26 Senior Member

    Krzys is right.
    I think you can use "merci de" before and after
    And you would use "merci pour" only after. (almost always).

    And it's also true that you would never say
    Merci des chocolats

    I don't think we have. Or if we have, we were wrong.
    Merci de votre aide
    Merci de votre compréhension

    EDIT : Have Just read your post again, timpeac, and I don't understand it. There seems to be a contradiction. You're saying that "de" is always used before a verb and then you ask what difference there is with "pour" when "de" is used before a noun.
    EDIT2 :right! I've got it. What you mean is : before a verb, "de" is always used. Sorry. (subtlety of the English language).
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 28, 2009
  18. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    LV4-26

    Sorry, but I have to ask - Have you read the whole thread?

    Anyway my understanding of what has been said so far is that -

    De is always used before a verb. Merci de comprendre... Merci de me faire savoir ....

    We also established that it is always merci pour + concrete noun. So merci pour les chocolats, as you confirmed again in your previous post.

    So that leaves the question we were discussing, what is the difference in nuance between merci de/pour followed by a non concrete noun.

    There is no point in me repeating all of the examples given so far so I suggest you read the thread, for example my post 11.
     
  19. LV4-26

    LV4-26 Senior Member

    I had read the whole thread, timpeac (though a bit fast maybe) as I always do.
    The point is that I didn't really agree with brigitte's point as to "de" being used when you plan to carry on the subject and "pour" when you plan to stop it short.
    Now I may have missed something in the thread even though I read it thoroughly. (Scout's honor!;) )
     
  20. Krzys New Member

    France
    Comme dit plus haut, "de" est plus formel que "pour", dans les cas où il y a ambiguité (même différence que "vous"/"tu"). Dans le doute il vaut mieux utiliser "de".

    Et "pour" est toujours employé après coup, jamais avant.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  21. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    LV4-26, sorry - I was a bit snappy above. A few things going on today. You are a welcome, helpful and valued contributor, as always.:)
    However, gain valour in my eyes by telling me what the damn difference in nuance between de and pour after merci and before a non-concrete noun is!!

    Merci mon ami. Tim:)
     
  22. LV4-26

    LV4-26 Senior Member

    You're welcome, Tim

    And...sorry, I don't think I can be of any further help. If you've read my comments in red below your sample sentences, you know all I know on the matter. Apart from "de" when you thank in advance and "pour" when you thank afterwards, I'm afraid I have no other idea. And I suspect there is nothing else, actually. "merci de votre aide" when you're asking for help and "merci pour votre aide" after someone has helped you. As far as I know, there exists no other general rule. Moreover, I don't think this could be called a rule because there doesn't seem to be any logical explanation to it.

    By the way, I've started a thread on the "English only" forum because I'd totally misunderstood you when you'd written "de" is always used before a verb".
    As it concerns my own comprehension of the English language I thought it would be better to start a new thread on that forum.

    Cheerio
    Your friend Jean-Michel
     
  23. OlivierG

    OlivierG Senior Member

    Toulouse, France
    France / Français
    My try about this tricky topic:
    - When before a verb, we use "merci de" (Merci de me prévenir)
    - When before a concrete noun (physical object), we use "pour" (Merci pour les fleurs)
    - When before another kind of noun, then it's a bit more complex.
    As Jean-Michel/LV already said, when thanking afterward, I'd use "pour" (Merci pour l'aide que vous avez apportée), and "de" when thanking in advance in a formal way (Merci de votre compréhension). However, in case of doubt, I'd use "pour", which remains correct even in the latter case (Merci [d'avance] pour votre compréhension).
     
  24. Jabote Senior Member

    Mirabel, Quebec, Canada
    French from France
    C'est vrai si tu n'ajoutes rien... mais si tu dis "merci d'avance pour ton aide", il n'y a pas faute...
     
  25. Apus Senior Member

    Confederatio Helvetica French
    Discussion très intéressante. J'ajouterais que merci pour... est plus correct au point grammatical. On remercie pour quelque chose.
     
  26. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Donc on ne dirait jamais "je vous remercie de votre compréhension"? (ou quelque chose de semblable)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  27. Jabote Senior Member

    Mirabel, Quebec, Canada
    French from France
    Mais si, justement, on peut parfaitement le dire.... D'ailleurs je ne suis pas certaine que du point de vue grammatical "pour" soit plus juste que "de". Ce sont deux prépositions.... Donc a priori, tout sens mis à part bien entendu, aussi correctes l'une que l'autre...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  28. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Il me semble que la question de "remercier de-pour" se réduit alors, essentiellement, au même que "merci de-pour".
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  29. Jabote Senior Member

    Mirabel, Quebec, Canada
    French from France
    Absolument ! Avec un verbe tu ne peux utiliser que "de", mais avec un nom, "pour" convient tout aussi bien que "de"....
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  30. la reine victoria Senior Member

    Bonjour!

    Please can someone explain the difference between these two ways of saying 'thank you for' and when they should be used? Merci.
     
  31. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
    Bonjour !

    Mainly:

    Merci de + verb = merci de m'aider à comprendre cette règle de grammaire
    Merci pour + noun = merci pour votre aide au sujet de cette règle de grammaire
     
  32. hald Senior Member

    Paris
    France
    Quelques exemples :

    Merci pour les fleurs
    Merci pour l'invitation
    Merci pour tes encouragements

    Merci de ne pas fumer ici
    Merci de bien vouloir fermer la fenêtre
    Merci de m'avoir aidé

    La construction se fait de la façon suivante :
    Merci pour + complément d'objet
    Merci de + infinitif
     
  33. xav

    xav Senior Member

    Paris
    France
    J'ajouterai que l'expression "merci de + verbe" avec un verbe au présent est assez récente, je l'ai entendue pour la première fois en 1998. Pour ma part, je trouve que c'est une manière à peine polie de donner un ordre.
     
  34. hald Senior Member

    Paris
    France
    Euh je ne me rends pas bien compte de ce que ça peut donner ... Merci de ferme la fenêtre ? Ou quelque chose du genre "ferme la fenêtre, merci" ?
     
  35. Gil Senior Member

    Français, Canada
    Merci se construit avec la préposidion de ou pour suivie d'un nom. Merci suivi d'un infinitif se construit avec de
     
  36. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
    Voulez-vous dire : merci de m'aider à fermer la fenêtre pour donner un ordre et non pour remercier ?
     
  37. xav

    xav Senior Member

    Paris
    France
    Pardon, c'est vrai, j'aurais dû être plus précis ! Ce que je disais vaut pour
    "merci de" + verbe à l'infinitif présent
    "Merci de fermer la fenêtre" = "Ferme la fenêtre, merci" (ou "s'il te plaît !", qui est plus poli)
    ;)
     
  38. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
    Je suis vraiment d'accord avec vous sur ce point, Xav !
    Surtout que cette tournure est souvent accompagnée d'un ton sarcastique ou désobligeant (on entend très fort : vous auriez quand même pu y penser avant que je vous le dise...)
     
  39. xav

    xav Senior Member

    Paris
    France
    Oui, puisque pour remercier on utilisera plutôt l'infinitif passé :
    merci de m'avoir aidé à fermer la fenêtre.

    Ceci dit, vous avez raison, si l'on est en train de fermer la fenêtre, que quelqu'un vient vous aider et que cela dure assez longtemps pour qu'on puisse remercier pendant l'action, cela devient un remerciement. Mais il me semble qu'on l'entend beaucoup plus désormais comme une demande fortement appuyée ; en tout cas dans le contexte professionnel. Qu'en pensez-vous ?
     
  40. la reine victoria Senior Member

    Alors,

    Merci de m'avoir aider.

    Merci pour votre assistance. :)

    Merci beaucoup:D
     
  41. Gil Senior Member

    Français, Canada
    Et
    Merci de votre aide.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  42. DDT

    DDT Senior Member

    Paris, France
    Italy - Italian
    So that there are some exceptions...any other, natives? :confused:

    DDT
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  43. xav

    xav Senior Member

    Paris
    France
    Oui ; la règle exprimée par Gil autorise "merci de" devant des substantifs, et cela me paraît correct.

    "Merci de ton assistance" = "Merci pour ton assistance"
    "Merci de tes lettres" = "Merci pour tes lettres".
     
  44. DDT

    DDT Senior Member

    Paris, France
    Italy - Italian
    Donc on peut utiliser "merci de" + substantif quand on utilise un adjectif possessif ?

    DDT
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  45. Gil Senior Member

    Français, Canada
    ama, l'adjectif possessif importe peu.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 31, 2012
  46. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
    C'est très vrai, malheureusement, car ce qui pourrait être un remerciement sonne comme un reproche.
    Néanmoins, l'infinitif passé s'impose lorsque l'action est achevée. Je corrige donc mon poste numéro deux pour dire que, le plus souvent :

    - merci de + infinitif => remerciement pour une action en cours
    - merci de + infinitif passé => remerciement pour une action achevée


    - Merci de m'aider à éplucher les pommes de terre ! Je suis assise devant 10 kg de pommes de terre, je n'en suis qu'à la troisième et Xav prend un couteau et commence à m'aider. Je le remercie.

    - Merci de m'avoir aidée à éplucher les pommes de terre ! Nous avons terminé d'éplucher les pommes de terre et je remercie Xav pour sa gentillesse.

    Je pense que merci pour s'emploie pour un objet concret, et merci de pour une notion abstraite.

    Merci pour vos fleurs
    Merci de votre gentillesse
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 28, 2009
  47. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Oui, nous avons traîté ce thème il y a longtemps et si je ne me trompe c'était bien ça la conclusion que nous en avons tirée.

    Je crois qu'en cas de doute, on devrait opter pour "pour" puisque c'est plus répandu. On pourrait dire "merci pour votre gentillesse" sans choquer trop l'oreille ?

    En plus, n'y a-t-il pas une différence entre "merci pour la compréhension que vous m'avez montrée" et "merci de votre compréhension" (dont vous ferez preuve plus tard) ? Ou j'invente des nuances ?
     
  48. sbc

    sbc Senior Member

    Montreal, Canada
    Canada, English
    Bonjour!

    Après avoir lu cette discussion très intéressante, j’en ai quand même une question…

    J’imagine qu’on dirait « merci de votre collaboration »...?
     
  49. Agnès E.

    Agnès E. Senior Member

    France
    France, French
    Oui, c'est cela, sbc. :)
     
  50. sonsinimitables

    sonsinimitables Senior Member

    California
    English, Florida -- USA
    Bonjour tout le monde !

    Je vous serais reconnaissante si vous pourriez m'aider...j'aimerais bien comprendre la différence entre "merci de" et "merci pour." Quand est-ce qu'on dit "merci de" ? Quand est-ce qu'on dit "merci pour" ?

    Merci d'avoir m'aidé
    Merci d'avance

    **Est-ce qu'on utilise "merci de" avec les adjectifs et les verbes ?

    Merci pour ton aide

    **Est-ce qu'on utilise "merci pour" avec les noms ?

    Merci beaucoup !!! :)
    ~sonsinimitables~

    P.S. Feel free to correct grammar mistakes. I would appreciate it :)
     

Share This Page