1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)
  1. TheTimeHasCome New Member

    American English-Southern
    Bonjour à tous!

    I was hoping someone could shed some light on a sentence I am having some difficulty with.

    I am trying to convey that even though FL books/readers are grammatically appropriate for beginners in a second language, they lack intrigue and excitement and ultimately, students have no interest in reading them. Would you mind telling me if there is a real difference between these two sentences?

    1) Chez l’auteur, ces éléments se mélangent bien pour créer un livre avantageux pour les élèves, mais au bout de compte, ces bouquins ne se lisent pas.

    2) Chez l’auteur, ces éléments se mélangent bien pour créer un livre avantageux pour les élèves, mais au bout de compte, ces bouquins ne sont pas lus.

    Please feel free to let me know if you think there is a better way to phrase this, but ULTIMATELY, what I really want to know is if there is a difference between these two passive phrases?

    Merci d'avance!
     
  2. iksess New Member

    French
    Ces phrases sont un peu étranges, sans le contexte (qu'est ce qu'un livre Avantageux ?... )

    […]

    Ne se lisent pas / Ne sont pas lus : pour moi c'est équivalent. On ne peut pas déduire qu'ils sont illisibles, dans aucune des deux formules.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2013
  3. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Actually, both sentences have the same meaning: These books don't get read. (To say that they are illegible, we would just say that: Ces livres sont illisibles.)

    Because we tend to avoid the passive voice in French, I would use the active voice here.

    1) Ces bouquins ne se lisent pas. (neutral)
    2) Ces bouquins ne sont pas lus. (emphasis on the books: they are useless)
    3) Ils ne les lisent pas. (emphasis on the students: they don't read them)
    4) Personne ne lit ces bouquins. (neutral)
     

Share This Page