1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

FR: subjonctif présent ou futur / subjunctive in the future tense

Discussion in 'French and English Grammar / Grammaire française et anglaise' started by rochellio, Sep 17, 2006.

  1. rochellio Junior Member

    England, English
    Moderator note: multiple threads merged to create this one
    What do you do when you want to talk about the future, but you have an expression that requires the subjunctive?

    Hi, I was wondering if someone could clarify this for me:
    I gather that in French the subjunctive is never used for the future tense (please correct me if this is wrong!) […] e.g. on craint que les terroristes ne choisiront les... [Is this correct?]

    Any help would be much appreciated!
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2010
  2. pieanne

    pieanne Senior Member

    Nice Hinterland
    Belgium/French
    No, after "craindre", you can safely use the subjunctive […]

    "On craint que les terroristes ne choisissent ..."
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2010
  3. geostan

    geostan Senior Member

    English Canada
    […]
    Sometimes the Future tense may be used, where one might expect a subjunctive.

    Je ne crois pas qu'il vienne demain. Depending on the degree of doubt, a future might be used here instead of the subjunctive.
    Je ne crois pas qu'il viendra demain.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2010
  4. carolineR

    carolineR Senior Member

    Indian Ocean
    France
    personally, I think the sentence should read : On craint que les terroristes choisissent...
    but orally, and because of disregard of two rules , you'll hear "on craint que les terroristes ne choisiront ..."
     
  5. villefranche Senior Member

    Je sait qu'on doit utiliser le subjonctif avec "il est possible que," mais, dans la phrase suivant, ça marche? Il me semble que le future soit nécessaire.

    J'ai écrit dans un courrier électronique à un ami, cette phrase:
    "J'essayerai d'arriver à midi demain, mais, il est possible que, je sois un peu en retard."

    La phrase, a-t-elle un sens?

    Merci d'avance
     
  6. itka Senior Member

    France
    français
    Tout-à-fait. Cette phrase est très claire et très correcte.

    Le mode subjonctif n'est pas concerné par les temps et le verbe de la proposition principale indique clairement qu'il s'agit du futur.

    Par contre, les virgules ne sont pas correctes !
    J'essayerai d'arriver à midi demain, mais il est possible que je sois un peu en retard."
     
  7. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Peut-on utiliser aussi le futur de l'indicatif ?

    J'essayerai d'arriver à midi demain, mais il est possible que je serais un peu en retard.​
     
  8. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Non (et ça c'est le conditionnel, pas le futur) - on utilise le subjonctif du présent même s'il s'agit du futur.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2013
  9. heatinitup New Member

    england, english
    Bonjour!
    Does anyone know what the future subjunctive of devoir in its "il" form is?
    It doesn't seem to be in my dictionary!
    Merci en avance!
     
  10. marget Senior Member

    I think the present subjunctive is used to express the future. It should be "doive", as far as I know.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2013
  11. mathiine Senior Member

    Brasilia
    français - France
    Please write the context but I think marget is right.
    eg : je ne pense pas qu'il doive venir demain.
     
  12. heatinitup New Member

    england, english
    ces circonstances exigent que l'Angleterre doive bientôt diriger.....
    Thanks in advance!
     
  13. mathiine Senior Member

    Brasilia
    français - France
    You wrote it right
    ;)
     
  14. xtrasystole

    xtrasystole Senior Member

    France
    In French, the subjunctive mood has no future tense form. In fact, it has only 4 tenses: 1) présent; 2) imparfait; 3) passé; 4) plus-que-parfait.
     
  15. BillyTheBanana Senior Member

    Pennsylvania, USA
    USA, English
    Here's a weird question I just thought of on this topic. Is it possible to construct a subjunctive future tense by putting "aller" in the subjunctive, followed by an infinitive? I don't know how it would be used, but I just thought I'd ask for curiosity's sake.
     
  16. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Like this?

    Je vais voyager.
    Il est possible que j'aille voyager.​
    I suspect that his structure (if possible) would still be analysed as a present subjunctive.
     
  17. BillyTheBanana Senior Member

    Pennsylvania, USA
    USA, English
    Yes, that's what I was talking about. Is that normal to say, or would it be more natural to simply say, "Il est possible que je voyage," with the idea of the future being implied?
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2015
  18. tilt

    tilt Senior Member

    Nord-Isère, France
    French French
    Il est possible que j'aille voyager wouldn't be understood as near future, no, but as a odd and wordy equivalent to Il est possible que je voyage.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2013
  19. CapnPrep Senior Member

    France
    AmE
    I don't think the futur proche aller can go in the subjunctive:
    Il va guérir. ~ Je suis content qu'il aille guérir. :cross:
    Tu vas te taire. ~ Il faut que tu ailles te taire. :cross:
    To expand on tilt's message #10, this means that in the example with que j'aille voyager, aller would have to mean "go" (and this doesn't make much sense with voyager). With other verbs this interpretation can be easier, or impossible:
    Je vais faire mes courses. ~ Il est possible que j'aille faire mes courses. (one can "go shop")
    Je vais venir. ~ Il est possible que j'aille venir. :cross: (one cannot "go come")
     
  20. Fred_C

    Fred_C Senior Member

    France
    Français
    Hi CapnPrep,
    I do not know if you are a native french speaker (your profile says you are a native english speaker). But I think you are absolutely right, and I agree with you. (I am just saying that just to comfort people, because my profile says that I am a native French speaker.)
     
  21. nouvellerin Senior Member

    Bordeaux
    English (US)
    I understand the grammar of the French subjunctive, but what troubles me is how to use it in the future tense.

    Example: If I’m talking about how I want to go jogging later, I would say, “I’m going jogging later because I don’t think it’s going to rain.”

    But as je ne pense/crois pas demands the subjunctive, I get caught up!

    Can I say:

    Je ne crois pas qu’il pleuve toute à l’heure.
    Je ne crois pas qu’il aille pleuvoir toute à l’heure
    Je ne crois pas qu’il pleuvra toute à l’heure
    Je crois qu’il ne pleuvra pas toute à l’heure
    […]

    Can someone correct my above examples, and give examples of the correct way to express a subjunctive state or action that will happen in the future?
    Thank you!
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2010
  22. berndf Moderator

    Geneva
    German (Germany)
    French does not have a future subjunctive. You use present instead. […]

    I think you have no choice than to say
    Je ne crois pas qu’il pleuve
    and
    Elle ne croit pas qu’il soit décu
    Maybe a native speaker can either confirm or correct me.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2010
  23. enJoanet

    enJoanet Senior Member

    London UK
    Français
    Voilà!
    enjoanet
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2013
  24. enJoanet

    enJoanet Senior Member

    London UK
    Français
    salut!
    Pour ma part, j'utiliserais plus volontiers le subjonctif qui me semble être plus nuancé et plus fin...Le futur peut être correct, mais...il y a un "je-ne-sais-quoi" avec le subjonctif que je ne saurais pas expliquer!!! :p:p
     
  25. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    You've already got detailed feedback on the specific sentences you asked about from the natives. Here's a general remark. There is no independent future tense in the subjunctive mood. Often, the present subjunctive takes its place. Other times, the future indicative is used. You must learn little by little which phrases take the future indicative and which ones take the present subjunctive.
     
  26. Darunia Senior Member

    Cape Cod, Massachusetts
    English-United States
    As I recall from French class, one must always use the subjunctive with certain verbs like souhaiter and falloir. But does that include the future? Is there a future subjunctive?

    Say,


    "I hope that he returns."

    I know you could say "je souhaite qu'il revienne," but what if I wanted to express it in the future---, say, 'I hope that he WILL return later,' would it still be the present subj. or would it be nominative future? Would it be "je souhaite (ou espere) qu'il reviendra?"
     
  27. Lezert

    Lezert Senior Member

    Midi-Pyrénées
    french, France
    Your question is a little strange, because the fact that comes after souhaiter, falloir are obviously in the future ( when souhaiter and falloir are at the present tense , you cannot wish that something occurs in the past )
    In other words, when you say je souhaite qu'il revienne , if he comes back, it will be in the future , no other way
     
  28. StefKE

    StefKE Senior Member

    Brussels
    French - Belgium
    Well, there is no future subjunctive. But the Present Subjunctive implies an future idea. If you say "Je souhaite qu'il revienne", it implies that you want him to return in the future, even if it is a very near future.

    Besides, if you want to say I hope that he will return later, you will say: Je souhaite qu'il revienne plus tard.

    Anyway, you can easily solve that tricky question by using an other verb which does not require a subjunctive: J'espère qu'il reviendra. Which changes slighty the meaning of the sentence but still means the same, more or less.

    But you cannot say: *Je souhaite qu'il reviendra.

    I hope this will help you...
     
  29. Lazlow Senior Member

    Hessle, East Yorkshire, UK
    British English
    Salut tout le monde,

    Je voudrais poser une petite question concernant le subjonctif quand on l'utilise avec le futur. Quand j'étais en France le printemps dernier, quelqu'un m'a dit qu'on utilise le subjonctif présent si la phrase exige le subjonctif, même si le contexte est futur - par exemple:
    -"Est-ce qu'il viendra demain?"
    -"Non, je ne pense pas qu'il vienne demain."

    Mais mon prof de français ici (elle est française, elle dit, mais je suis pas sûr!) nous a dit qu'il faut utiliser l'indicatif, même si la phrase exige le subjonctif - par exemple:
    -"Est-ce qu'il viendra demain?"
    -"Non, je ne pense pas qu'il viendra demain."

    Donc je voudrais savoir quelle phrase est correcte, et si quelqu'un pourrait m'aider je serais très reconnaissant!

    Merci d'avance.
     
  30. Virtuose

    Virtuose Senior Member

    Polish/Poland
    Je pense que le subjonctif présent est employé pour l'action simultanée ou dans le futur.
    Ex. Il est 10h. C'est indispensable que tu sois prêt à 14h.

    Alors moi, je dirais: Je ne pense pas qu'il vienne demain.
     
  31. L'Inconnu Senior Member

    US
    English
    Selon mon grammaire, après certains verbes d’opinion comme ‘penser’, ‘trouver’, ‘dire’, ‘croire’, etc. à la forme affirmative l’indicatif est obligatoire. Si l’on utilise la forme négative ou interrogative, cependant, on peut choisir également entre l’indicatif et le subjonctif. Donc,
    Non, je ne pense pas qu'il viendra demain.:tick:
    Non, je ne pense pas qu'il vienne demain.:tick:
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2010
  32. Lazlow Senior Member

    Hessle, East Yorkshire, UK
    British English
    Hmm... d'accord. Mais ça, ce n'est que avec les verbes d'opinion? Donc est-ce qu'il faudrait dire,

    "Je te donnerai mon numéro pour que tu puisse m'appler"

    et pas

    "Je te donnerai mon numéro pour que tu pourras m'appeler"?

    en d'autres termes, avec les phrases qui exigent le subjonctif qui ne sont pas des verbes d'opinion, on ne peut pas choisir?
     
  33. janpol

    janpol Senior Member

    France
    France - français
    ... pour que tu puisses m'appeler.
    "pourras" est absolument incorrect.
    "pour que tu puisses......" est une finale et cette proposition exige le subjonctif car elle n'exprime pas une réalité mais "une conception de l'esprit" (Grevisse)
    tu peux employer le futur si tu abandonnes "pour que" et optes pour deux indépendantes juxtaposées : je te donnerai mon numéro; ainsi, tu pourras m'appeler.
     
  34. Lazlow Senior Member

    Hessle, East Yorkshire, UK
    British English
    Donc la demande du subjonctif outrepasse le futur, pour ainsi dire. Ou là là, il est trop tard pour la grammaire! Mais merci beaucoup, tout le monde - c'est beaucoup plus clair maintenant!
     
  35. roymail Senior Member

    Ardenne Belgium
    french (belgian)
    Non, là c'est simple :
    Pour que introduit une proposition finale (autrement dit : qui indique un but). Dans ce cas, on a toujours pour que, afin que + subjonctif, quel que soit le verbe de la principale.
    Pour les propositions complétives (introduites par que tout seul), c'est en effet plus compliqué. Tout dépend du verbe principal. Chaque verbe ou catégorie de verbe a ses petites habitudes.
    Par exemple : verbes de crainte + subjonctif (je crains qu'il (ne) vienne)
    verbes d'opinions : je pense qu'il viendra - je ne pense pas qu'il viendra / qu'il vienne (cf. l'Inconnu)
    Il serait trop long de donner ici toute la liste des catégories de verbes, mais ça doit se trouver quelque part dans WR.

    En ce qui concerne la nuance entre je ne pense pas qu'il viendra et je ne pense pas qu'il vienne, elle est super-extra light. L'attention se porte un tout petit peu plus sur venir dans le premier cas et sur penser dans le second, mais...Le subjonctif est un peu plus recherché, l'indicatif un peu plus populaire. Mais là encore, c'est très léger.
     
  36. shin chan 14

    shin chan 14 Senior Member

    Leeds
    United Kingdom, Liverpool - English
    I've been wondering if it ever existed in the French language, as It still exists in Spanish and Portuguese as far as I know.

    I've looked everywhere to find an example of what it looked like in French but to no avail :(

    Furthermore, is it possible to say: J'ai peur qu'il n'aille vomir. Or does that sound just weird to you?

    If anyone could find an example of what it was written like, I would be very grateful :D

    Merci à tous
     
  37. itka Senior Member

    France
    français
    Le subjonctif futur n'existe pas en français et il n'est pas utile. Le subjonctif est un mode non un temps.
    On emploie le subjonctif présent si l'action n'est pas encore terminée et le subjonctif passé si elle est accomplie :
    "J'ai peur qu'il ne vomisse." (maintenant, demain ou dans six mois au cours d'un voyage maritime).
    "J'ai peur qu'il n'ait vomi" (il y a un instant, hier, l'année dernière...)

    Si on tient à marquer le temps, il faut le faire avec le verbe de la principale :
    J'ai peur (maintenant) qu'il ne vomisse.
    J'aurai peur (plus tard) qu'il ne vomisse.
    J'ai eu peur (à un moment du passé) qu'il ne vomisse.
    J'avais peur (habituellement, dans le passé) qu'il ne vomisse.
    etc.
     
  38. shin chan 14

    shin chan 14 Senior Member

    Leeds
    United Kingdom, Liverpool - English
    Merci beaucoup itka mais je n'ai que voulu savoir s'il y avait des exemples du subjonctif futur. Je sais bien que ça n'existe plus, mais autrefois.

    en outre, au sujet du phrase 'J'ai peur e.t.c' je me demandais si l'on le dirait jamais, en parlant peut-être.

    Je suis désolé pour ne pas avoir m'expliquer bien. :eek: Je suis curieux si le subjonctif futur existait. :eek:


    Mais merci beaucoup pour tes exemples, ce sont vraiment utiles :)
     
  39. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    I thought that if you really must have a stressed future sense to the subjunctive, instead of "aller", as in the indicative mood, use "devoir" to produce a near-future type construction: "Je ne pense pas qu'il doive m'aider demain" but usually the present subjunctive on its own is preferred.

    Is that right, natives?
     
  40. janpol

    janpol Senior Member

    France
    France - français
    "Je ne pense pas qu'il doive m'aider demain"
    Ce n'est pas à un "futur proche" que je pense en premier en lisant cette phrase.
     
  41. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    French never had a future subjunctive verb form. The Portuguese and Spanish future subjunctive derives from the Latin perfect subjunctive.
     
  42. janpol

    janpol Senior Member

    France
    France - français
    "Je crains qu'il ne puisse m'aider demain"
    Le subjonctif et l'adverbe "demain" situent l'action dans le futur.
     
  43. itka Senior Member

    France
    français
    Non, il n'y a pas et il n'y a jamais eu (à ma connaissance) de subjonctif futur en français. Ne connaissant ni l'espagnol ni le portugais, je ne peux même imaginer à quoi ressemble ce temps !

    Ta phrase
    n'a pas de sens si on prend le verbe "aller" pour l'auxiliaire du futur proche.

    Il sort ---> je veux qu'il sorte.:tick:
    Il va sortir ---> *je veux qu'il aille sortir.:cross:
    Il sortira ---> *je veux qu'il sortira:cross:
     
  44. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Le futur proche est parfois employé dans la langue littéraire au subjonctif présent.
     
  45. HappyDance9 New Member

    English - United Kingdom
    There is no future subjunctive in French. However, you can indeed use the Futur Proche in the Subjunctive. It's formed by taking Aller (Present Subjunctive) + infinitive.
    For example/Par example:

    I will go to the beach providing that I am going to see my friends.
    J'irai à la plage porvu que j'aille voir mes amis.

    I hope that you are going to be polite.
    J'espère que tu ailles être poli.

    Le Futur Proche can indeed be used in the subjonctif. You can add a future phrase before the futur proche subjunctive (like in the first example) to show it is meant as future.

    I hope this helps. Au revoir! (;
     
  46. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Hello HappyDance9 and welcome! :)

    The future proche is actually barely ever used in the subjunctive. There are only rare occurrences in the literature. See also the thread futur proche au subjonctif ? on the Français Seulement forum.

    J'irai à la plage pourvu que j'aille voir mes amis. :warning: Here aille voir is not the verb voir in the futur proche but the verb aller followed by an infinitive! The meaning is therefore "… provided that I go and see my friends."

    J'espère que tu ailles être poli. :cross:J'espère que tu vas être poli. :tick: The verb espérer must be followed by the indicative, not the subjunctive. See also FR: espérer que + mode.

    With a verb requiring the subjunctive (e.g., souhaiter que), only the present subjunctive is natural, even to refer to a future event:

    Je souhaite que tu sois poli.
     
  47. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Je voulais en fournir un exemple :
    -- Mais, penses-tu réellement que j'AILLE mourir ? (JAMMES, Antigyde, p. 209 dans Grevisse, Le bon usage, 14e édition, p. 1042.)
     
  48. JeanDeSponde

    JeanDeSponde Senior Member

    France, Lyon area
    France, Français
    Je pense que Francis Jammes est 1/ soit un plaisantin se foutant de la gueule du futur du subjonctif, 2/ soit un écrivain qui a mal digéré Molière (tout comme Francis Huster a mal digéré Gérard Philippe).

    Soit que JdS aille discourir ailleurs de la grammaire, lui qui n'y connait rien.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2014
  49. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    À en juger d'après les contributions des francophones, le futur proche du subjonctif est en effet rare. De commentaires par les auteurs de Le bon usage on peut pas cependant savoir comment le perçoivent les natifs. Au risque de jeter de l'huile sur le feu, je donne un autre exemple par un autre auteur :
    Oh ! mon Dieu ! pourvu qu'il n'AILLE rien arriver ! (HUGO, M. Tudor, III, I, 6 dans Grevisse, Le bon usage, 14e édition, p. 1042.)

    Mais attention : le futur proche du subjonctif semble ne pas sortir hors de la langue littéraire où il se voit parfois utilisé.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2014
  50. JeanDeSponde

    JeanDeSponde Senior Member

    France, Lyon area
    France, Français
    Les natifs le perçoivent... avec amusement et étonnement.
    Des exemples cités par CapnPrep dans le fil cité plus haut par MeCap, le seul qui ne me choque pas est effectivement celui de Victor Hugo (Oh ! mon Dieu ! pourvu qu'il n'aille rien arriver !).
    Je trouve d'ailleurs que ce qui peut sembler un futur proche (il va m'arriver quelque chose) se rapproche en fait d'un emploi de aller indiquant une "action imminente redoutée" (TLF, II.C.1.c), "... pour remonter sans chandelle, si j'allais me tromper de porte ?" (Pourrat).

    Mais les autres exemples font vraiment procédé ("vous allez voir comment que je cause bien français").
    Un peu comme si j'espère qu'on va sortir voir un film tout à l'heure pouvait raisonnablement se transformer en pourvu qu'on aille sortir voir un film tout à l'heure.

    Maintenant ces tournures sont vraiment très rares de nos jours (et ne ne l'étaient guère moins par le passé), et peut-être que, ce qui nous est inhabituel nous paraissant mal foutu, je trouve mal foutue la phrase de Jammes à laquelle je ne peux par ailleurs rien reprocher d'autre....
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2014

Share This Page