1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

FR: un verre du vin/de vin

Discussion in 'French and English Grammar / Grammaire française et anglaise' started by jankat, Mar 19, 2010.

  1. jankat Junior Member

    Turkish
    hello,

    i always tend to see a difference between un verre du vin and un verre de vin, like a wine glass and a glass of wine in english. but since no one really explained to me, i have only preconceptions of which i am far from sure.

    i generally find examples of de vin. but i have also come across du vin. can you tell me which means which?

    thanks in advance.
     
  2. djudju Senior Member

    french-english France
    Un verre à vin = a wine glass
    un verre de vin = a glass of wine
     
  3. jankat Junior Member

    Turkish
    so, un verre du vin is definitely wrong, eh?

    all right then.

    thanks a million, djudju.
     
  4. djudju Senior Member

    french-english France
    A bit late, maybe, but anyway... " du vin" can be used in cases like:
    du vin de mauvaise/bonne qualité
    avez-vous bu du vin aujourd'hui?
    cette région produit du vin connu
    etc.
    cheers
     
  5. SwissPete

    SwissPete Senior Member

    94044 USA
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    Verre du vin could be used in « J'ai bu un verre du vin que le patron recommandait ».

    Un verre de vin - a glass of wine.
    Un verre du vin - a glass of the wine.

    Remember: du stands for de le.
     
  6. jankat Junior Member

    Turkish
    oh, i knew the article partitif usage, but i wouldn't really think du instead of le would be used in the sentence "cette région produit du vin connu". thanks for that. i guess i have to practice more in order to "think" in french.

    un verre du vin is also an unfamililar usage for me, but i understand what you're saying clearly. thanks to both of you.
     
  7. Feilin New Member

    Europe/Chine
    Svenska
    How about the following:

    Il n'y a pas de/du vin (connu).

    Where the parenthesis marks a connection back to the wine that's mentioned or being talked about.
     
  8. Suehil

    Suehil Medemod

    Tillou, France
    British English
    After 'pas' it is always 'de'. 'Il n'y a pas de vin connu.'
     
  9. broglet

    broglet Senior Member

    England - English
    For clarity, I think the only context in which you would use 'un verre du vin' is where you are distinguishing it from some other possibility, eg
    "J'ai du vin et du jus d'orange ... qu'est-ce que tu veux?" "Un verre du vin svp!"
     
  10. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    As a matter of fact, just saying un verre du vin without any complement may be correct grammatically speaking, but it is unidiomatic; we would say un verre de vin even if the wine is known from the context.

    — J'ai du vin et du jus d'orange. Qu'est-ce que tu veux ?
    — Un verre du vin, s'il te plaît. :thumbsdown:Un verre de vin, s'il te plaît.
     
  11. lucas-sp Senior Member

    English - Californian
    It's pretty much the same thing in English, no?

    I drank a glass of wine.
    I drank a glass of the​ wine that the waiter had recommended.
     
  12. binhle410 Senior Member

    Vietnamese
    I would like to add up to the questions.

    J'ai bu un verre du vin que le patron recommandait =
    I drank a glass of the​ wine that the waiter had recommended.
    J'ai bu du vin que le patron recommandait = I drank some​ wine that the waiter had recommended.

    Let s wait a native speaker to come and correct this ^_^

     
  13. Feilin New Member

    Europe/Chine
    Svenska
    Yes, that's what I recall from French class, but I think I've seen exceptions to this "rule" (Hahaha, that's funny! As if there ever were any in the French language..... -__- )
     
  14. lucas-sp Senior Member

    English - Californian
    I would just change one little thing:
     

Share This Page