FR: venir de l'/d'Angleterre, de (la) France, du Canada - article devant les noms de pays

Discussion in 'French and English Grammar / Grammaire française et anglaise' started by lilliputthegreat, Jul 11, 2006.

  1. lilliputthegreat Senior Member

    English; United Kingdom
    I've read in a French text book that <<de>> preceeds the name of a feminine country starting with a consonant and <<d'>> preceeds the name of a country (masculine or femnine) starting with a vowel. Therefore, wouldn't it be proper to say <<je viens d'Angleterre>> instead of << je viens de l'Angleterre?>> If no, why so?

    Which one is correct to say: <<Je suis partie en Angleterre>> ou <<Je suis partie à l'Angleterre>>. If the first sentence is correct, is there an incidence where <<...à l'angleterre>> would be used? If yes, please me an example.

    In what instance (if any) would the phrase <<...à la France>> be used?

    Moderator note: Multiple threads have been merged to create this one. See also our language resources about countries as well as the following threads:
    FR: de (la) France - article
    de (la) France - forum Français Seulement
    venir de (la) Suisse, téléphoner de l'/d'Italie, etc. - article devant les noms de pays - forum Français Seulement
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 14, 2013
  2. anangelaway

    anangelaway Senior Member

    Toulouse
    French
    Bonsoir ! :)

    The following link provided by Aupick at once, will surely absorbs your doubts.
    I'm sure someone will post an interesting explanation.
     
  3. semiller Senior Member

    Dallas, Texas
    USA-English
    Bonjour! I've heard some people say, "Je viens de France" and others say "Je viens de la France." Are both correct? I always thought that the "la" in the second sentence is not required. If so, does this rule apply to all feminine countries? Examples would include "Je viens de Belgique," "Je viens de Suisse, etc. Merci bien!
     
  4. Donaldos

    Donaldos Senior Member

    French - France
    As far as I am concerned, I would only say "Je viens de France" (no article).
     
  5. sneaky13

    sneaky13 Senior Member

    marseille (france)
    français
    je viens de la France= j'arrive de la France
    je viens de France= je suis français (ou au moins résident)
     
  6. semiller Senior Member

    Dallas, Texas
    USA-English
    Yes, just as I suspected, no article. Merci bien!
     
  7. SonnenscheinANA New Member

    German-Germany
    Wow. That's a good site.

    It made all sense to me until I came across one of my exercises in the French book.

    So you have to say: Il vient de Bretagne (feminine)
    or you have to say: Il vient du Canada. (masculine)

    All good up to here until the book said: Il vient de LA Cote d'Ivoire. But why that now?

    Also, the website above with the link says "Il vient de Cote d'Ivoire" but the book says LA, so is the book wrong?

    Thanks for your help!
     
  8. klodaway

    klodaway Senior Member

    2 1/2 years later, I am not sure lilliputthegreat will still be interested in my remark :( ,
    but for the occurrence of "à l'Angleterre", there is the likes of :
    "Ces documents ont été rendus à l'Angleterre."

    klod-
     
  9. mmepixie Junior Member

    Canadian English
    Bonjour,

    Est-ce qu'on dit "Je viens de Canada" ou "Je viens du Canada". Egalement, Je viens de la France/de France? Encore plus, "au sud de la France" ou "au sud de France"? Ce sont des questions grammaticals qui me laissent perplexe depuis un bon bout de temps.

    Merci par avance.
     
  10. brian

    brian Senior Member

    Montréal
    AmE (New Orleans)
    I think it depends on the place. For example, I'd say "Je viens de France" but "Je viens du Canada". I think it's a masculine-feminine thing.

    However, it's easiest just to say "Je suis canadien/français."
     
  11. linguist786 Senior Member

    Blackburn, England
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Why not "en" here?
     
  12. linguist786 Senior Member

    Blackburn, England
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Oh I think I get it now. If you have a verb which is followed by 'à', then it will be "à l'Angleterre" otherwise not.
     
  13. grenouille182

    grenouille182 Senior Member

    si le pays est du genre féminim on dit : Je viens de France, Je viens de Slovaquie, Je viens de Colombie
    et si le pays est du genre masculin on dit : Je viens du Canada, je viens du Vénézuéla, je viens du Libéria etc. ...
    c´est correct ce que j´ai écrit ?
     
  14. wordreferant New Member

    English
    I'm confused by these: Je viens de Australie. Je viens d'Inde. Je viens de Indonésie. Je viens d'Ukraine. What's the rule with vowels? Usually d' but why sometimes is it de?
     
  15. janpol

    janpol Senior Member

    France
    France - français
    Je viens de Australie. Je viens d'Inde. Je viens de Indonésie. Je viens d'Ukraine.
    e a = deux voyelles >>> hiatus, même remarque pour e i.
    Il faut élider le "de" >>> d'Australie, d'Indonésie
     
  16. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    When the name of a country starts with a vowel (except Y), you have to do the elision.

    Je viens de Australie/Indonésie :cross:Je viens d'Australie/Indonésie. :tick:
     
  17. janpol

    janpol Senior Member

    France
    France - français
    de l' / de la :
    << je viens de l'Angleterre?>>:cross:
    mais "il vient de l'Angleterre profonde".
     
  18. mancunienne girl Senior Member

    England
    English - England
    So..... following this rule would one say "il vient des Seychelles", "il vient d'Haiti?"
     
  19. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland

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