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fraffly-fraffly

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Mylittleponny, Jul 1, 2011.

  1. Mylittleponny New Member

    Oporto, Portugal
    Portuguese
    What does it mean this "Australian" gem? Thanks.
     
  2. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    Please provide a complete sentence and any context that might help us. Thank you.
     
  3. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    When you ask about a word or expression you must give us the sentence and the source.
    This is explained in the forum rules:
     
  4. Mylittleponny New Member

    Oporto, Portugal
    Portuguese
    I think the original sentence was "fraffly-fraffly well-spoken English",
    I'm not sure.
     
  5. Mylittleponny New Member

    Oporto, Portugal
    Portuguese
    As with all my quotings posted here until now, the source is the
    extraordinary "the Story of English" by Robert McCrum et al..
     
  6. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Oh, right, in that case it is an Australian doing his best to say "frightfully, frightfully" with a posh English accent.

    PS: in this particular context, "frightfully" is equivalent to "very".
    My daughter did frightfully well on sports day. She won 42 medals.
     
  7. Mylittleponny New Member

    Oporto, Portugal
    Portuguese
    Great! Thanks.
     
  8. entangledbank

    entangledbank Senior Member

    London
    English - South-East England
    In the 1960s an author using the pseudonym Afferbeck Lauder created a series of humorous books about dialect, coining the name Strine for Australian and Fraffly for high-class England English, pretending he was writing guides to foreign languages, not English. They rely on using spellings that exaggerate the features of the accent. (So 'Strine' is supposed to be how Australians say 'Australian', 'fraffly' is how the posh English pronounce 'frightfully', and so on.)
     
  9. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Stoke on Trent
    England and English
    What I have found funny about this word is that it is supposed to gently mock the upperclasses, yet the only people I've ever heard use it (for comic effect) are posh themselves!
     

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