1. robbie_SWE

    robbie_SWE Senior Member

    Sweden
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    Split off from this thread.

    Maybe it's a bit off topic (since we're discussing the Spanish word), but the French renard has its source in mediaeval literature. It was the name of a character in the book Roman de Renart (< the name is of German origin). The book was so popular that the main character's name (who is a fox), substituted the real name for fox which was (and to some extent still is) goupil.

    Hope this wasn't too off topic Frank06!? :D

    :) robbie
     
  2. Frank06

    Frank06 Senior Member

    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,

    The name comes from Frankic (hence indeed Germanic) Reginhart, from PGm *ragin (advice, adisor) and *hart (strong, hard).

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     
  3. robbie_SWE

    robbie_SWE Senior Member

    Sweden
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    Thanks Frank06!

    But what about goupil? It looks very strange to me, because it doesn't seem to resemble any other Romance, Germanic or Slavic word for fox.

    :) robbie
     
  4. Frank06

    Frank06 Senior Member

    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,
    Well, it does:). Goupil is a cognate of... wolf.

    Earlier attestations for French are 'goupieu' (XIth century), 'gupil' (1119), 'gulpil' (c.1155).
    The word goes back to Vulgar Latin 'vulpiculus' (<Cl. Latin 'vulpecula', 'little fox' < Cl. Latin 'vulpes', 'volpes', fox). The initial g seems to be due to Germanic influence (see also war - guerre).

    It is obvious that Latin 'volpes, vulpes' (Vulpes vulpes) is a cognate of 'wolf' (Canis lupus), but even 'vulpes' and 'lupus' seem to go back to the very same PIE root: *wlq^wos. (l is syllabic l, ^w is superscript w). See also here.

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     
  5. Kaschiller Banned

    Romania
    gullet - 1305, from O.Fr. goulet, dim. of goule "throat, neck," from L. gula "throat," from PIE base *gel- "swallow" (cf. L. gluttire "to gulp down, devour," O.E. ceole "throat," O.C.S. glutu "gullet," O.Ir. gelim "I devour")gulp -(v.), 15c., from Flem. gulpe or Du. gulpen "to gush, pour forth, guzzle, swallow," possibly of imitative origin.

    from etymonline

    gulp-(v.), 15c., from Flem. gulpe or Du. gulpen "to gush, pour forth, guzzle, swallow," possibly of imitative origin.

    Does gulp have any connection with gulpil?
     
  6. Frank06

    Frank06 Senior Member

    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    And what exactly does all this have to do with the French word goupil?
    I do realise that the combination of vague lexical similarities and a lot of imagination and creativity can result in the most fantastic theories and explanations, but a bit more substance would be highly appreciated.
    Mindlessly quoting similar looking words from various dictionaries in various languages is not a way to deal with etymology.

    Frank
     

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