1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

From the opera Lakmé, by Léo Delibes

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by GutterGlitter, Dec 18, 2007.

  1. GutterGlitter Junior Member

    Candyland, California
    English (US)
    Would I say "De l'opéra Lakmé, de Léo Delibes?" or can I use something else other than "de" for either time?
     
  2. Missrapunzel

    Missrapunzel Senior Member

    Paris
    French (France)
    Can you please give us some information on how you want to use this sentence? Because it may change the translation.
     
  3. GutterGlitter Junior Member

    Candyland, California
    English (US)
    I'd say "This song is from the opera Lakmé, by Léo Delibes." I know it can be "Ce chanson est de l'opéra Lakmé, de Léo Delibes," but I'm wondering if using the "de" twice is correct, or would sound ok to a native speaker, because it sounds a bit repetitive to me. And that's really all the context I can give you.
     
  4. gustave

    gustave Senior Member

    Sevilla
    français
    Cet air est extrait de Lakmé, l'opéra de Léo Délibes
    ou
    cette chanson est inspirée de Lakmé, l'opéra de Léo Délibes
     
  5. GutterGlitter Junior Member

    Candyland, California
    English (US)
    Merci gustave :)
     
  6. candypole Senior Member

    australia english
    From the opera Lakmé, by Léo Delibes

    C'est un aria extrait de l'opéra de Léo Délibes, Lakmé

    I've often said "song" in English, referring to operatic arias, and the opera buffs do not like it - they insist on aria. Is this the situation in French?
     
  7. gustave

    gustave Senior Member

    Sevilla
    français
    oui, c'est ce que j'ai mis plus haut, on parle d'un air d'opéra. Maintenant, tu peux faire une chanson à partir d'un air d'opéra.
    On ne dit pas aria en français, sauf si on est très snob.
     
  8. candypole Senior Member

    australia english
    Thanks, that's really useful to know.
     

Share This Page