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fry vs roast

Dieses Thema im Forum "English Only" wurde erstellt von belissimo, 27. August 2009.

  1. belissimo

    belissimo Senior Member

    Russia, Moscow
    Russian
    Hello,
    Could you help to identify the principle difference between fry and roast?
    (I read the definitions and the previous threads)
    My attempt: we roast in in oven with dry heat
    we fry with oil on open fire (on a cooker).
    Am I right?
     
  2. b1947420 Senior Member

     
  3. belissimo

    belissimo Senior Member

    Russia, Moscow
    Russian
    thanks a lot
    So I got it right:)
     
  4. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Frying usually involves oil - as in deep frying, shallow frying, stir frying. But there is also dry frying without the use of any additional fat. The crucial element is that the heat comes from below.
     
  5. belissimo

    belissimo Senior Member

    Russia, Moscow
    Russian
    thanks a lot
    Please, could you give just one example what we can fry without fat ?
     
  6. Valvs Senior Member

    Moscow, Russia
    Russian
    Hmm. When you roast a piece of meat on a spit over hot ambers, the heat comes from below, but you are still not frying it. I think the real distinction is that in frying, the food is actually in contact with the surface it gets the heat from.

    Pretty much anything can be fried dry in teflon-coated pans. I guess there may be some recipes specifically calling for dry-frying, but I am not much of a cook :).
     
  7. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Dry-drying usually involves a non-stick pan. Sometimes, the item to be fried has fat in it, eg bacon. The heat causes the fat in the bacon to melt, so in fact some fat is involved, only it's from the food item itself.

    I have heard of people dry-frying an egg without fat if the non-stick pan is a good one. I also know of dry-frying nuts (eg cashews or almonds) to brown them, where you stir them around in a pan without adding any oil.

    You're right, Valvs. I was over-simplifying. You need to have the food come into contact with a surface (a pan or something else).
     
  8. belissimo

    belissimo Senior Member

    Russia, Moscow
    Russian
    Hello again,
    I have one more question about fry and roast?
    If I hear about dry-roasted nuts, does it automatically mean that the nuts were roasted in an oven of over open fire?
    Thanks
     
  9. Majorbloodnock Senior Member

    South East England
    British English
    Roasting is cooking by putting the food near a direct heat source, and particularly a direct heat source underneath the food. Therefore, a spit roast over a fire is correctly named. If the heat source is in the shape of a grid, this is a specific form of roasting that has become known as grilling.

    If you simply heat the air around the food (such as in an oven), you're actually baking, not roasting. However, for fat-containing foods such as meat, the melting fat heats up and effectively becomes a direct heat source in itself, so baking meat in an oven has come to be known as roasting even if it's not strictly accurate.

    Frying is simply cooking something in oil; either totally submerging the food (deep fat frying) or cooking in a thin layer of oil (shallow frying). Any of the foods that one might "dry fry" already contain a certain amount of fat, so heating them up releases the fat into the pan and the food shallow fries in the conventional sense at that point. If you try doing the same to a food that doesn't contain much fat (such as breadcrumbs), you're considered to be toasting them or dry-roasting them instead.

    I hasten to add that this is my experience and opinion, but nothing more official than that. I'd also like to point out that many cooking terms that once were separate have now converged through evolution. Therefore many terms overlap each other, allowing for a huge grey area where both are correct (or at least universally understood to be so).
     
  10. belissimo

    belissimo Senior Member

    Russia, Moscow
    Russian
    Thanks a lot Maj,

    So 'roasting' doesn't uncude any additional oil in a process (just of a product itself, if it has it) and needs a direct heat sourse. Except for 'roast" meat (which it's not strictly accurate term)?
     
  11. Majorbloodnock Senior Member

    South East England
    British English
    Personally, I don't think it much matters whether there is oil present for roasting or not. However, if you're dry-roasting in a pan and then add some oil, you're effectively switching to frying. Nonetheless, if you want to roast something over a fire, it's roasting whether you've smeared oil over it or left it dry.
     
  12. belissimo

    belissimo Senior Member

    Russia, Moscow
    Russian
    Thanks a lot again.
     

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