1. SaintGerm Senior Member

    France
    France / French
    Hello,
    I can't find the translation for fudge as a noun in the WR.
    It is a kind of a candy, isn't it?
    How could it be translated? Bonbon crémeux :confused:

    Thank you.
     
  2. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    "Fondant crémeux" pourrait aider à décrire cette friandise nord-américaine, mais même l'Office québécois de la langue française admet le mot anglais fudge :

    Il est préférable de conserver l'emprunt fudge pour désigner la sucrerie nord-américaine bien connue : produit mou et crémeux, coupé en carrés.
     
  3. livvie Senior Member

    Bretagne
    Gibraltar, English
    "caramel crémeux" ?

    If I say fudge here in Bretagne the French (Breton's to be exact) have no idea what I'm talking about !!
     
  4. Iznogoud

    Iznogoud Senior Member

    French - Canada
    Le fudge est généralement au chocolat, donc caramel ne me paraît pas idéal. Du chocolat crémeux, peut-être?
     
  5. disturb_me Senior Member

    English
    Fudge isn't really the same as chocolate though...
     
  6. SaintGerm Senior Member

    France
    France / French
    Merci pour vos réponses,
    Dans mon cas, il s'agit de fudge de Pologne :)
     
  7. livvie Senior Member

    Bretagne
    Gibraltar, English
    That would be chocolate fudge!!

    Fudge is made by mixing sugar, butter, and milk and heating it to the soft-ball stage and then beating the mixture while it cools so that it acquires a smooth, creamy consistency.
     
  8. Iznogoud

    Iznogoud Senior Member

    French - Canada
    Yes, I know. My point is that fudge is very frequently chocolate-flavoured, in which case I'd call it "chocolat crémeux".

    Fudge is commonplace around here. When it's chocolate-flavoured, we call it "fudge" (even in French). Otherwise, we call it "sucre à la crème".
     
  9. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    Chocolate fudge sounds redundant, since all fudge is chocolate in the US, at least for purists. Otherwise, it is "penuche" or "fondant"--but that is probably splitting hairs.
     
  10. livvie Senior Member

    Bretagne
    Gibraltar, English
    In the UK 'fudge is fudge' and 'chocolate fudge is chocolate fudge'!!:D

    I've made lots of fudge but I've never made chocolate fudge! Non-chocolate fudge, you don't know what you're missing out on!
     
  11. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    I didn't miss out, livvie, I just knew it by a different name--penuche.
     
  12. livvie Senior Member

    Bretagne
    Gibraltar, English
    Frankly I'm relieved I was a little worried earlier! :)
     
  13. Arrius

    Arrius Senior Member

    Spain
    English, UK
    The fudge I knew was not usually chocolate-flavoured though that did exist too.
    It was made as livvie has described but normally bought at the confectioner's and was light brown (tan) in colour. Delicious but very sinful in these days of the obesity crisis.
     
  14. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    You can read the history of fudge on Wikipedia. It's an American invention, the result of a "fudged" (failed) batch of chocolate something else. It also reports that outside the US, fudge has been made with all kinds of other flavors but retained the fudge name--which is mostly reserved here for the original chocolate version.
     
  15. Iznogoud

    Iznogoud Senior Member

    French - Canada
    Not that I necessarily want to get into the finer gastronomical points about fudge, but penuche has nuts, whereas fudge does not.
     
  16. dewsy Senior Member

    Versailles
    England, english
    The nearest I've ever found here is "caramel mou", but it's not what I'd call real fudge, more soft toffee.....
     
  17. disturb_me Senior Member

    English
    I thought Cornwall was famous for fudge? Not America...
     
  18. SaintGerm Senior Member

    France
    France / French
    But Fudge is not the name of a brand, is it?
     
  19. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    fudge is fudge! --no capital letter and not a brand
     
  20. Arrius

    Arrius Senior Member

    Spain
    English, UK
    Certain varieties of Spanish turrón, varying with the region and eaten particularly at Christmas, seem to me to be virtually identical to fudge and sometimes contain nuts like penuche. I looked in vain for fudge in my English Larousse Gastronomic Encyclopaedia - gallic culinary snobbery perhaps?
     
  21. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    A hot fudge sundae is made with ice cream and hot chocolate syrup. Without chocolate, it would not be a fudge sundae.
     
  22. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Same here, but it sounds like what Americans mean by "fudge" is not the same product that we think of - I've never heard of chocolate fudge either, or rather fudge being chocolate flavoured, only the caramel type.
     
  23. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    I've had turrón, and while tasty in its own unique way, it is not really that similar to fudge, which is soft and dissolves in the mouth, whereas I found turrón quite chewy and took a bit of time before it would melt in the mouth...
     
  24. SaintGerm Senior Member

    France
    France / French
    Hmm, I agree, turrón is a a kind of a nougat. As far as I've understood, fudge is more similar to a [SIZE=-1]caramel.

    [/SIZE]
     
  25. Becca1502 New Member

    England, english
    Could it be 'Caramels au beurre salé ?
     
  26. SaintGerm Senior Member

    France
    France / French
    Bonjour,
    Je ne pense pas qu'il s'agisse de caramel au beurre salé. L'intérieur est crémeux.
    Je vais garder "Fudge" dans le texte.
    Merci à tous de m'avoir éclairé sur le sujet.

    Pour ceux que ça intéresse, voici un site dédié au fudge : http://www.fudge-recipe.com/ ;)
     
  27. calembourde

    calembourde Senior Member

    Genève, Suisse
    New Zealand, English
    I thought I'd wake up this thread to add a combination of words slightly different from the ones mentioned so far. I am currently eating what I call (delicious) caramel fudge, which is labeled caramels à la crème. I believe this is a Swiss thing, because the last time I had some (maybe not with exactly the same name, but I do remember crème being in the name), it was being sold as a local specialty at a rather touristy stall in Montreux. Indeed, it seems to be a specialty of the canton of Jura. But it seems just like caramel fudge to me.
     
  28. kiwi-di

    kiwi-di Senior Member

    Perth, Western Australia
    New Zealand, English
    When I was a kid in New Zealand (several years before you my friend calembourde :) ) fudge was always of the chocolate variety.

    Interestingly, (in light of your post) a caramel version of the same thing was called "swiss caramel".

    You can buy caramel fudge here in Australia but it has a different texture from the fudge I remember as a kid - it is far more creamy. Unfortunately, no matter what it's called, it's both delicious and fattening. That [caramel] product existed when I was a kid, but right now I can't for the life of me remember what we called it.
     
  29. Grop

    Grop Senior Member

    Provence
    français
    This is what I would suggest, as well as chocolat crémeux for the chocolate variety.
     

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