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gather pace

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Rosel78, Mar 24, 2009.

  1. Rosel78 Junior Member

    italian
    dopo aver letto questa frase: "The marketing of replica shirts,which already gathered pace in the mid to late 80s.."mi chiedo quale sia in questo caso il significato della parola "pace".Visto che to gather significa anche acquistare mi viene da pensare che in questo caso il significato della frase sia "La vendita delle magliette replica,che aveva già preso piede dalla metà fino alla fine degli anni 80.."
    Qualcuno sa se questa mia interpretazione é corretta?:D
     
  2. TimLA

    TimLA Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    English - US
    Ciao,
    Suona un po' strana a me (orrechi AE), quindi è forse BE.

    Indica:
    ...which already increased the rate of sales...

    ????
    ...un aumento nei venditi...
    ...un aumento nel tasso dei venditi...
    ????
     
  3. Puig_70 Senior Member

    Marche
    Italian
    Hoping you don't mind these corrections :D
     
  4. TimLA

    TimLA Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    English - US
    Not at all! And I thank you!:D
     
  5. miri

    miri Senior Member

    Italy/Italian
    Il Ragazzini dà "to gather pace, acquistare velocità", quindi sì, "preso piede", "preso slancio" o "già in crescita" potrebbero andare ...:)
     
  6. Rosel78 Junior Member

    italian
    scusate,mi correggo!la parola "PACE" si trova in questa frase "The marketing of replica shirts,which had already gathered pace in the mid to late 80s.."mi ero dimenticata "had"!!
     
  7. Rosel78 Junior Member

    italian
    ottimo!!!!
     
  8. pask46 Senior Member

    Torino, Italy
    Italy-italian
    Sì, concordo.
    Pace, più che velocità, è l'andatura, il passo, il ritmo.
    "Prendere piede" lo vedo come la traduzione migliore.
     
  9. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    To gather momentum is a synonym for to gather pace.

    Sono d'accordo con voi, ragazzi!:) Prendere piede, prendere slancio.
     
  10. pask46 Senior Member

    Torino, Italy
    Italy-italian
    Well... I don't know... "the momentum" is much more related to a psychological condition.
    In a sport game they talk about "momentum" when a team, with a spectacular play or an exciting hit (I'm a rugby and american football fan), is able to change the inertia of the game. Of course, scoring should be the best way, but sometimes a single play has a terrific effect!
    So I match "momentum" with "inertia" more than "pace"... what do you think, London?
     
  11. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Pask, momentum in Latin means movement, as a matter of fact, not inertia. ;) Have a look at these definitions in English:

    To gather momentum.
    Pace

    And take a look at this definition of "gather pace": if events gather pace they move faster.

    A pensarci, alla fine forse prendere slancio è la traduzione migliore (anzichè prendere piede) , perchè significare partire in avanti, no? Quindi contiene l'idea del movimento e della velocità, direi. E vedo da un post precedente che anche il Ragazzini lo traduce con "acquistare velocità", ma prendere slancio suona meglio, secondo me, visto che si parla della vendita di magliette.

    Cosa ne pensi?:)
     
  12. pask46 Senior Member

    Torino, Italy
    Italy-italian

    Well... I agree with you on everything, but "inertia".
    Inertia is definitely a movement!
    Not spontaneous, not an "own" one, but a movement!
    The example I posted (related with sports and sports language)
    depicts "momentum" as the psychological "lead" of a game. Not necessarly a lead in points or score, but the feeling of having the game in hand. As this is not a factor wich can be controlled, they talk about inertia... something moving by his own, but needing an external force to do it.
    I hope to be understandable... as I'm getting confused myself!!!
    Anyway I think both your translations work fine.
    And I clap hands on "prendere slancio"! Well found!

    About the correction... do not use infinite form in this case: it sounds like the talk of indians in old western movies!

    Augh! Io correggere te, donna bianca!:D
     
  13. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    I'm absolutely convinced it was a typo!

    About momentum and inertia: they are two terms borrowed from physics, but with slightly changed meanings. In everyday English, inertia is the fact of being inert, as on a Sunday afternoon after a heavy lunch! It certainly isn't used in sport, unless we mean something like torpore.
    Momentum (in physics quantità di moto) is commonly used to mean slancio, impeto. It's not only a psychological term.
     
  14. pask46 Senior Member

    Torino, Italy
    Italy-italian
    You're right (with that nickname you couldn't be wrong!!!:D) about physics, but I did not mean "momentum" as borrowed from psychological sciences... just the way it is used in that context (sports) has much more to do with psychological aspects than real ones. A team gets the momentum of a game following a score or a big play, and this does not necessarly mean being ahead in the scoreboard. But (as they also say) it means "taking the inertia" of the game...
    even if "inertia" is more like, as you pointed, what happens on a sunday afternoon right after a big meal!
    Inertia is a movement, not a conscious one, we could say...
    "Andare avanti per inerzia" in Italian is exactly what you mean... keep on moving without will... "trascinarsi" ...

    We're going a little off topic, though...

    About London's mistake... I also believe it's a typo... London speaks (writes) a very good italian! (By the way....how do you say... "non è da lei"?).
    And my correction was comic... making a mistake while trying to correct someone else's... (I can't say it was a typo...:().
     
  15. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    Non è da lei = It's not like her
     
  16. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Einstein, sorry, just read your posts...thanks for the support!
     
  17. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    I've just seen a mistake in my last post. Italian = per inerzia; Latin = per inertia.
    Sorry:eek:.
     
  18. Rosel78 Junior Member

    italian
    Grazie per in numerosi interventi :))))).In ogni caso penso che la traduzione più corretta sia,in questo caso equivalga a "prendere slancio"
     
  19. pask46 Senior Member

    Torino, Italy
    Italy-italian
    Lo dicevo io!
    Is not like her, appunto...
    Egregia LondonCalling... Lei "mi sa anche di latino"... la mia ammirazione cresce ulteriormente!;)

    Anyway, just to add some confusion... in Italian also "inerte" is somebody or something which does not move!
    I think the misunderstanding comes from a partial consideration of the inertial movement itself. Which is a movement (as we said) but not a "motu proprio" (own movement), as it need an external force to start.
    An object moving "per inertia" gets the status of immovable, in common sense... forgetting all the rest!

    I knew Physic was not my subject, that's why I took Poli Science...
     

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