1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

Genitivo sassone/possessive case con il plurale o nomi che terminano per S

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Mago-Merlino, Apr 2, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Mago-Merlino Senior Member

    Italy Italian
    Se io per esempio dovessi scrivere "combattimento dei ninja" uso :
    Ninja's battle?
    Ninjas's battle?
    Ninjas battle?

    In ogni caso qualcuno mi sa spiegare come si usa far ein genere con i plurali ed il genitivo sassone?
    Vedo sempre soluzioni diverse...
     
  2. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Nessuna di quelle.. Ninjas' battle.
     
  3. Murphy

    Murphy Senior Member

    Sicily, Italy
    English, UK
    Usando il genitivo sassone al plurale, non c'è bisogno di una seconda "S", quindi sarebbe "the Ninjas' battle". Altrimenti "the battle of the Ninjas" va anche bene.

    Altri plurali usando il genitivo sassone;
    the boys' mother
    the babies' father
    the dogs' bones
    the girls' magazines
     
  4. Mago-Merlino Senior Member

    Italy Italian
    Ciao a tutti, solito problema.
    Ho capito un pò come funziona.
    Preferisco chidere a voi per questi due casi.
    E' meglio scrivere :

    Intro and actions' music : Bobby McFerrin - Don't worry be happy
    oppure
    Intro and actions music : Bobby McFerrin - Don't worry be happy

    Ending credits' music : Truby Trio - A go go
    oppure
    Ending credits music : Truby Trio - A go go

    Insomma, suonano meglio con la s' o senza queste frasi?
    Oddio sono imbranato...
     
  5. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
  6. Mago-Merlino Senior Member

    Italy Italian
    Grazie Paul.
    Purtroppo in quell'articolo non ho trovato nulla riguardo il "compound noun".

    Richiedo umilmente, in questi due casi dove sto scrivedo gli ending credits di un video, devo usare il genitivo sassone o posso usare il compound noun?
     
  7. TimLA

    TimLA Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    English - US
    Ci puoi spiegare l'uso di "action(s)"?

    Nel secondo esempio, "Ending credits music" va bene - non c'è bisogno di usare il possessivo.
     
  8. Mago-Merlino Senior Member

    Italy Italian
    Il video ha due musiche di sottofondo.
    Una durante l'intro (i titoli) e le "azioni" di gioco.
    L'altra durante gli ending credits.
     
  9. TimLA

    TimLA Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    English - US
    Quindi direi:
    Intro and action music : Bobby McFerrin - Don't worry be happy
     
  10. Mago-Merlino Senior Member

    Italy Italian
    Grazie Timla e Paul.
     
  11. Ottavio Amato

    Ottavio Amato Senior Member

    Italia
    Italia
    Ciao a tutti,
    how do I use the Saxon Genitive in this context?

    "la Provincia di Roma ha inteso rispondere alle esigenze dei cittadini, degli operatori commerciali e dei trasportatori, per lo sviluppo di un servizio di distribuzione delle merci efficiente ed efficace e che costituisse un punto d’eccellenza per la città".

    This is my attempt:

    "the Province of Rome intended to answer its citizens, commercial operators and transporters’ needs of developing an efficient and effective goods distribution service that could be a point of excellence for the city".

    I don't know whether or not to use the apostrophe for all of the three words, like this: "...citizens', commercial operators' and transporters’ needs...".
    It doesn't sound good to me. :confused:

    Thanks in advance
     
  12. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    "...citizens', commercial operators' and transporters’ needs...".


    This is fine, but if you don't like it you're not obliged to use the Saxon genitive. You can say "the needs of citizens, commercial operators and transporters...". In any case the preposition that follows is "for", not "of".:)

    PS "ha inteso rispondere"... If you say "intended", it suggests "intendeva". Maybe "has decided". Also "respond to needs" rather than "answer".
     
  13. papi

    papi Senior Member

    Italy - Italian
    I thought that when you have more than a word, you put the Saxon Genitive only after the last word....
    For example:
    John and Mary's house
    Cats and dogs' shelter
    :confused:
    But maybe it's my only last neuron that got drunk!?!? :D

    Laura
     
  14. paoman Senior Member

    Atlanta, GA
    Italy Italian
    For what I know you put the Saxon Genitive only after the last word if all the terms in the list "own" the same thing, otherwise you put it after every term.

    eg.

    John and Mike's parents
    implies that John and Mike are brothers, they have the same parents

    John's and Mike's parents
    are John's parents and Mike's parents, 4 different people.

    May be some native speaker can tell us st more...
     
  15. giovannino

    giovannino Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    To make things even more complicated for us learners:), in some cases a compound form is preferred to a genitive. I've done a quick search on Google and it seems that cat and dog shelter is the most common form.
     
  16. Psy577 Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Ciao a tutti!

    Volevo sapere se le intuizioni di Paoman potevano essere confermate da un madrelingua o meno...

    Il mio dubbio nello specifico è il seguente: devo riferirmi ad un articolo scritto da due tizi (Evered & Seldman, 1989).

    A quanto dice Paoman dovrebbe essere: In Evered & Seldman's (1989) article... Visto che l'articolo l'hanno scritto in due.

    L'accendiamo? ;)

    Grazie!
    Psy
     
  17. TimLA

    TimLA Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    English - US
    Ciao,

    Si può dire:
    ...in Evered and Seldman's article (1989) xxx...
    ...in the 1989 paper of Evered and Seldman xxx...
    ...in Evered and Seldman (1989) xxx...
    ...in Evered's and Seldman's 1989 paper...(ma non mi piace tanto)


    Ma dipende dal contesto esatto.
     
  18. Psy577 Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Grazie Tim!

    Per me il dubbio era tra la prima e l'ultima che hai elencato...
    I'll go for the first one then!

    Cheers,
    Psy
     
  19. ToWhomItMayConcern Senior Member

    English (U.S.) & Italiano [native bilingual]
    Neanche a me piace la versione con i due "apostrofi esse."
    Se stai facendo un riferimento bibliografico vero e proprio allora e` piu` bello
    ...in Evered and Seldman (1989) xxx...
     
  20. Psy577 Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Yeah, the only point is that every now and then I need to say: 'in Evered & Seldman's (1989) article' just to give my paper a litte bit of swing (and variety!) ;)

    Cheers guys!
     
  21. Psy577 Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    As 'there's no limit to the chances of learning' (= non si finisce mai di imparare ;) )
    here is a question I would have never thought of asking in my life...

    Related to the previous question, how do we use the genitive in the following case:

    the article of Hall et al. (1999)? It becomes:
    1. Hall et al.'s (1999) article OR
    2. Hall's et al. (1999) article?

    The first one?

    Thanks again!
     
  22. giovannino

    giovannino Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Here's an example from an academic text:

    "Quirk et al's (1985:459) terminology distinguishes between seven types of semantic role..." (link)
     
  23. TimLA

    TimLA Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    English - US
    Just a personal preference, but if I were to write it I would avoid the possessive:

    ...Hall et al have shown that...
    ...it has been demonstrated by Hall et al that...
    ...in the paper by Hall et al...

    and many other variations on the theme.
     
  24. Psy577 Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Thanks to the both of you guys... Now I really have no excuses for not completing my dissertation... Thanks again!
     
  25. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
  26. italtrav

    italtrav Senior Member

    Brooklyn
    English
    Perfect—except for the exceptions:D

    Generally, many ancient Greek or Biblical names: Socrates' speeches; Moses' actions; Ramses' tomb.
    There are other minor exceptions. And there are disagreements over names like Descartes. Personally, I always write, Decartes' Meditations.
     
  27. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    I'm sure that Mrs Jane Straus will be more than happy to amend her tutorial if you can persuade her she made a mistake :)
     
  28. italtrav

    italtrav Senior Member

    Brooklyn
    English
    Don't know Ms. Straus. Did once know Ms. Turabian, whose original manual is now The Chicago Manual of Style, one of the primary sources for such info, and which I relied on for the exceptions. The CMS, long with the MLA's manual, are probably the two most authoritative "rule books" in AE for anything that goes into print.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_Manual_of_Style
     
  29. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    I agree. Probably the reason is that when we add 's to a name ending in s we also add an unwritten vowel. As we already pronounce the e of Socrates, Moses and Ramses, unlike the silent e of James, it becomes too much if we say Socrates's etc.
     
  30. italtrav

    italtrav Senior Member

    Brooklyn
    English
    I should probably have added the CMS observation that the final syllable in some of these names both ends in "s" and has the sound of "eez." I'm not sure this rises to the stature of a rule, so much as (probably) explains the exception—except for Jesus and Moses:(
     
  31. vox76 New Member

    Italiano
    Ciao a tutti.

    Riprendo questo "vecchio" thread prima di tutto per osservare che la regola del genitivo "cumulativo" solo all'ultimo nome andrebbe usata solo quando non c'è possibilità di equivoco:
    Questo esempio a mio modo di vedere potrebbe essere interpretato come "John e i genitori di Mike" e non solo come "i geniori di John e Mike".
    La frase così espressa può avere quindi secondo me due significati quindi se si intende il secondo allora sarebbe opportuno il doppio genitivo in ogni caso.

    A parte questo avevo un quesito:
    In nessuna grammatica online tra quelle da voi citate ho trovato delucidazioni sulla pronuncia del genitivo. Tempo fa ho letto o sentito (purtroppo non ricordo dove) che il genitivo andrebbe pronunciato per intero anche quando è usato nella forma ridotta con il solo apostrofo. Cioè "the babies' father" andrebbe pronunciato comunque "babieses".
    Corrisponde al vero? O magari è valido solo in alcuni casi?

    Grazie per qualsiasi contributo.
    ;)
     
  32. Tristano Senior Member

    Philidelphia
    English - USA
    Le parole baby's, babies, e babies' hanno tutte le tre la stessa pronuncia. La pronuncia "babieses" sarebbe errata.

    Per quanto riguarda l'altra domanda, sì, è vero che "John and Mike's parents" potrebbe avere due significati diversi. Come in molti altri casi, si capisce dal contesto. Comunque, per rendere chiaro che i genitori appartengano solo a Mike e non a John, aggiungerei, parlando, una breve pausa dopo John, oppure direi semplicemente: "John, as well as Mike's parents" oppure "John, along with Mike's parents". Nella sua forma originale, "John and Mike's parents" indica che che tutti e due abbiano gli stessi genitori.

    :)

     
  33. Mary49

    Mary49 Senior Member

    Padova
    Italian
    Ciao vox,
    non mi pare di aver mai sentito quel tipo di pronuncia per un genitivo sassone con il solo apostrofo;
    http://english.stackexchange.com/qu...of-the-possessive-words-that-already-end-in-s "However, if the possessive is not added, so we have only James', the word is pronounced (in careful speech) exactly as if it were by itself. In other words, the possessive doesn't make a difference".

    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/p...847-possessive-case-after-words-ending-s.html
    "You pronounce waitresses (two waitresses) the same as waitress's (the possessive of one waitress).However, the possessive of more than one waitress, although spelled waitresses' is still only pronounced waitresses, not/waitresseses/ "

    http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080209064705AAbwXp3
    If the word already ends in an s then you would pronounce it with an added "es" on the end but if its a plural word then you wouldn't add another "es" to it. e.g. the babies' ... - you wouldn't pronounce it "babieses"
     
  34. vox76 New Member

    Italiano
    Quindi allora che differenza di pronuncia c'è, per esempio, tra:

    Chris' apartment
    e
    Chris's apartment

    visto che ho letto che in caso di nomi propri che terminano in "s" si possono usare tutte e due i modi?
     
  35. Mary49

    Mary49 Senior Member

    Padova
    Italian
  36. Pat (√2)

    Pat (√2) Senior Member

    Italia
    Italiano
    Ciao, Vox, e benvenut@. La risposta al quesito sulla pronuncia era già nel post di Einstein:
     
  37. vox76 New Member

    Italiano
    Grazie a tutti.
    Sono ancora un pò confuso.
    Riassumendo, vedo che se il sostantivo termina naturalmente in "s" (cioè non è plurale) allora si aggiunge 's e si pronuncia es (moss's).
    Se il sostantivo è plurale si aggiunge solo l'apostrofo e si pronuncia così com'è (waitresses').
    Se si tratta di nome proprio e termina già in es si aggiunge solo l'apostrofo e si pronuncia così com'è (Socrates').
    Se il nome proprio termina in "s" senza "e" (o con "e" muta come "James") come "Chris" nel mio esempio e nella citazione di Mary, allora sono possibili entrambi i casi ma si pronunciano sempre e comunque es.
    Ho capito bene? (spero di sì)

    ;)
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2012
  38. Pat (√2)

    Pat (√2) Senior Member

    Italia
    Italiano
    Se la 's non c'è non la pronunci (se devi fare un test di lettura/pronuncia, non so).
     
  39. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
     
  40. vox76 New Member

    Italiano
    Ciao √2 e intanto grazie.

    Tutto nasce dal fatto che varie volte mi è capitato di incappare in genitivi sassoni scritti senza "s" e comunque pronunciati con la "s", dunque volevo capire se esiste una regola scritta o una consuetudine con cui chiarire la questione. Ma dalle citazioni fatte qui mi pare di capire che la cosa non è chiara non solo a me ;)

    Sebbene negli altri casi della regola tutti siate concordi, la tua risposta e quella di alcuni cozza con la citazione di Mary49:
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2012
  41. ronconi Senior Member

    Viña del Mar
    Chile - Spanish
    Summary:
    When the word ending in "s" is a plural, you may or may not put an apostrophe, depending on whether you regard the "s"-ending word to be in the possessive case or an adjective (Students' Union, the workers demands).
    When the word ending in "s" is singular, add an apostrophe and an "s": "Saint James's Park", "Charles's misdemeanours", unless the word refers to a well-known historical figure: "Moses laws, Jesus miracles".
    In case of doubt, use the Latin construction with "of": "the plight of farmers, miners and members of Wordreferenceforum should not go unheard".
     
  42. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    "The workers' demands" needs and apostrophe. It means "the demands of the workers".
     
  43. aliazzina Senior Member

    italiano
    Una giornalista americana mi ha detto che l'apostrofo al plurale non si usa più. Discutevamo sulla parola "teams" in questa frase:
    The teams strong photo-journalism reportage experience enhances landscape, cultural tourism and travel reportage.

    Non sono sicura di aver capito e sono tuttora convinta che sia meglio scrivere The teams' strong photo-journalism reportage experience enhances landscape, cultural tourism and travel reportage.

    CCosa mi manca sapere? :O
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2014
  44. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Sarebbe meglio che tu facessi questa domanda sul forum English only visto che non riguarda in nessun modo la lingua italiana, grazie.
     
  45. Tristano Senior Member

    Philidelphia
    English - USA
    Nella frase da te citata, "teams" vuole l'apostrofo, perché termine possessivo. Chi dice il contrario (anche giornalisti) temo non abbia una conoscenza approfondita dell'argomento, e dice che non e' più obbligatorio perché' molti fanno lo stesso errore e non sanno le regole. Purtroppo, il possessivo sassone risulta problematico per molti... anche perché la pronuncia del sostantivo al plurale risulta uguale a quello del sostantivo al plurale col possessivo. Infatti, "the teams uniforms" e "the team's uniforms" e "the teams' uniforms" sono pronunciati allo stesso modo.

     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2014
  46. Tristano Senior Member

    Philidelphia
    English - USA
    Si, senza dubbio, "workers' demands" richiede l'apostrofo.

     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page