Georgian: number agreement of adjectives

Discussion in 'Other Languages' started by Moro12, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. Moro12 Senior Member

    Russian
    გამარჯობათ! მე ვსწავლობ ქართულ ენას.

    I have learned that the Georgian verb only takes a plural form if the subject is animate:
    ბავშვები ბაღში თამაშობენ.
    However, the verb remains singular if the subject is plural inanimate:
    ვარსკვლავები ციში ასხივებს. (BTW, is ციში a correct form?)

    I wonder what are the rules when it comes to adjectives. So, I have 4 questions:
    1. If an adjective is used before a noun, does it takes plural with animate nouns? Which is correct:
    ესენი ლამაზი ქალები არიან.
    ესენი ლამაზები ქალები არიან.
    1. If an adjective is used before a noun, does it takes plural with inanimate nouns? Which is correct:
    ეს ახალი წიგნებია.
    ეს ახლები წიგნებია.
    1. If an adjective is used as a predicate, does it takes plural with animate nouns? Which is correct:
    ესენი ქალები ლამაზი არიან.
    ესენი ქალები ლამაზები არიან.
    1. If an adjective is used as a predicate, does it takes plural with inanimate nouns? Which is correct:
    ეს წიგნები ახალია.
    ეს წიგნები ახლებია.

    I would appreciate any help.
     
  2. Ikalashxi New Member

    Georgian
    no correct form is ცაში.
    and i'm almost certain that verb still needs to be in plural at least in that sentence.
    correct form is ესენი ლამაზი ქალები არიან
    correct form is ეს ახალი წიგნებია
    none of the above are correct the proper form to say/spell it would be ეს ქალები ლამაზები არიან
    ეს წიგნები ახალია is the proper form to say it
     
  3. rev98 New Member

    German
    You are right.
     
  4. mopc New Member

    Brazilian Portuguese
    So varskvlavebi ts'ashi askhveben ​would be the way to say "stars are shining in the sky" right?

    So what is the rule after all? What inanimate nouns demand plural and what don't?
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2014
  5. rev98 New Member

    German
    This might really be an exception. We couldn't come up with other words like that (yet). Still thinking.
    Maybe because if you look at the stars it looks like they are moving/alive. Most cultures saw gods in them. Maybe in the Georgian language this feeling stayed alive up until now. But it's only an idea.
    Usually you wouldn't put the verb in the plural form if the subject is inanimate.
     

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