get in/on-get out/off subirse-bajarse de un vehículo

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by Lecword, Jan 18, 2013.

  1. Lecword Senior Member

    Hola a todos:

    Quisiera saber con qué medios de transporte se puede utilizar get in/out y get on/off. He estado mirando las definiciones y otros hilos pero no me queda claro. Por ejemplo, he visto que get off se puede utilizar con 'train' y otros, pero ¿con qué otros?

    Muchas gracias
  2. mcgb Junior Member

    get in/out of a car

    get on/off train, plane, boat
  3. craig10 Senior Member

    English - Scotland
    get on / off is generally used for public transport, i.e. trains, planes, buses, cable cars, ships, trams etc and motorcycles, bicycles and horses

    get in / out is used for cars and taxis
  4. Lecword Senior Member

    Thank you very much for your explanation! :)
  5. FromPA

    FromPA Senior Member

    Philadelphia area
    USA English
    My theory is that, generally speaking, there are 2 contexts in which you use "get off":

    1) if you have to climb to "get on" or enter the vehicle (e.g., bus, plane -- you typically have to climb stairs to enter a bus or plane).

    2) if you ride on top of the vehicle rather than inside the vehicle (horse, bicycle, motorcycle, jet ski).

    Take the example of a boat. If it is a large boat, I always use "get on/off the boat" because I have to climb something to get on/enter the boat. However, if it is a small boat, I can use either option, but I am more likely to use "get out of the boat" the smaller the boat gets - e.g., I would never use "get off a canoe." If a small boat has a cabin, I think I am more likely to use "get off the boat." It's a bit subjective.

    A ski lift doesn't fit my theory so neatly. You always "get on/off" a ski lift, but you don't really "climb" anything to get on a ski lift, and you don't literally ride on top of a ski lift. However, you also don't "enter" or "go into" a ski lift, so you must be "on" the ski lift, and if you are "on" something, you have to "get off."

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