1. cacahuatita Senior Member

    norte de México
    español (MX) / English (US)
    My English as a second language students asked me if there is a difference between the meaning of both of them.

    I can't find but little information about this, is there any difference for a native?
     
  2. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    It would be helpful if you could give us an example or some context, but usually "get" means "llegar" (referring to the end of the journey), whereas "go" means "ir" (the journey itself).
     
  3. kwagna33 Senior Member

    English
    I want to go to the store.
    I want to get to the store.

    As a native speaker, they mean the same to me. They're interchangeable. Yet, one instance that I can think of where there's a difference is the command:
    "Get to it!" which means "start working!"
    "Go to it!" (as a command) would be used if you were to tell someone to go to a destination. "Let's go to the park!" However, you could also say "Let's get to the park!" but "go to" sounds better.
     
  4. Bevj

    Bevj Allegra Moderata

    Girona, Spain
    English (U.K.)
    I agree with inib, I don't think that the two sentences mean the same at all.

    I want to go to the store means 'Quiero ir a la tienda' while 'I want to get to the store' means 'Quiero llegar' (perhaps there is some difficulty or problem involved in getting there).
     
  5. cacahuatita Senior Member

    norte de México
    español (MX) / English (US)
    As a native Spanish speaker, the only way "quiero ir a" and "quiero llegar a" would be different is that I would probably use "quiero ir a" if I was at home and I would have to start moving to go somewhere, and "quiero llegar a" would imply for me, that I'm not home yet, but on the road and I want to add one more stop before I get home.

    Your post left me a bit confused as I just don't see the difference, because to me, in Spanish "quiero ir a" and "quiero llegar a" are used differently than how you explained.

    Then now that I see my post, maybe that's the difference you "go to" a place when it is the first stop and you "get to" a place when it's one of a series of stops in a journey?

    But then we have a problem...what about "I ________ to work everyday at 7:30am"?
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2013
  6. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    I don't think it has anything to do with the number of stops.
    Supposing my journey to work takes an hour, and if I wanted to avoid ambiguity, I would choose between "I leave for work at 6:30 am every morning" and "I get to work at 7:30 am every morning". If my journey only took a few minutes, I might be less specific and use "go", but I still think it refers to the time spent travelling and not to the arrival itself.
    So, if someone asked me "What time do you go to work?" in the first situation, I'd clarify when I leave and when I get there.
     
  7. Bevj

    Bevj Allegra Moderata

    Girona, Spain
    English (U.K.)
    Yes, this is what I was trying to say :)
     

Share This Page