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Getting gas

Discussion in 'Nederlands (Dutch)' started by BlueWaffles, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. BlueWaffles Junior Member

    Boston
    English-America
    Hoi
    I'm translating "After you pick up your friend, we need to get gas" for practice. I'm more familiar with German, so I'm worried the structure would sound natural in German but not in Dutch.
    Nadat je heeft je vriend afgehaalde, moeten we tanken.
    Any help would be much appreciated
    Dank jullie wel!
     
  2. NewtonCircus Senior Member

    Singapore
    Dutch (Belgium)
    Dag Blauwe Wafels :),

    I don't know if my English is up to standard, but the difference between "pick up" and "Picked up" confuses me a bit. To me your sentence seems to have a mismatch between the tenses of the two verbs.

    So I'd say:

    After you have picked up your friend, we need to get gas: Nadat je je vriend hebt afgehaald, moeten we gaan tanken.
    After you pick up your friend, we need to get gas = Nadat je je vriend afhaalt, moeten we gaan tanken.

    Maybe this is just me but the Dutch translation seems to have the same mismatch between the first and last part.

    Groeten Herman
     
  3. Tazzler Senior Member

    Maryland
    American English
    Both tenses are valid in the first clause in this case.
     
  4. NewtonCircus Senior Member

    Singapore
    Dutch (Belgium)
    Dag BlueWaffles,

    In that case it is better to use Nadat je je vriend hebt afgehaald, moeten we gaan tanken I believe.

    Groetjes Herman
     
  5. HKK

    HKK Senior Member

    3010 Leuven, Be.
    Dutch/Belgium
    Agreed. In fact "Nadat je je vriend afhaalt..." is barely grammatical. Also, you can use wanneer instead of nadat. Oh, and there's not supposed to be a comma.

    EDIT I just realized... Een vriend afhalen? That sounds like you're pulling him from a hole in the wall like bami. I think ophalen is right here.

    All in all, I'd go with
    Wanneer je je vriend hebt opgehaald moeten we gaan tanken.
     
  6. NewtonCircus Senior Member

    Singapore
    Dutch (Belgium)
    Dag HKK,

    I agree with you more or less (Although such grammar seems to be the norm these days since there are plenty of examples on the internet). As I said, I didn't really know how to translate After you pick up your friend, we need to get gas since pick up is present tense here. This sounds strange to my Dutch or should I say Belgian ears :).

    I disagree. Why is iemand afhalen wrong?

    Groetjes Herman
     
  7. Lopes

    Lopes Senior Member

    Brussels
    Dutch (Amsterdam)
    Why is that? I think it's fine.

    I think there is.. ;)
    You mean like a frikandel? Noone pulls bami from a hole in the wall.

    ​Nu ben ik klaar met m'n commentaar ;)
     
  8. HKK

    HKK Senior Member

    3010 Leuven, Be.
    Dutch/Belgium
    Well, there is no need to keep the tenses in a translation. As long as the absolute and relative timing of the events stays the same, you're good. English tenses and Dutch tenses have a lot of similarities, but sometimes you must translate with a different one or end up with a stunted sentence.

    As I said, I use afhalen for pulling things from the wall, not for picking up people. I would use ophalen for that. However Van Dale agrees with you, so I seem to be on my own here! I should have checked first.

    I wrote a nice paragraph on this, then lost it trying to quote both Herman and you. So, excuse my laziness, here's a link saying that nadat is usually followed by a verb in a perfect tense (v.t.t. or v.v.t.). That is also my gut feeling.

    The more you learn :rolleyes: That comma looks kind of German to me, but well.

    I meant a bamiblok ;)
     

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