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give gloom

Discussion in 'English Only' started by jakartaman, Apr 5, 2013.

  1. jakartaman Senior Member

    Korean
    Hi :)
    Is any of these expressions below used?
    • give gloom
    • give a gloom
    • give a sense of gloom

    Say, I was sitting in a dark, quiet, and dilapidated place. I would feel depressed or gloomy.
    In such a case, can I say, "This place gives me gloom/a gloom/ or a sense of gloom"?

    Many thanks in advance.
     
  2. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    Hello, jakartaman. Of all the options you suggest, I like "give a sense of gloom" the best. The other two look really odd to me.

    That said, I'd expect a fluent English-speaker to express the idea differently: This place is gloomy. That's enough to tell your listener that the place gives you a "sense of gloom". If you wanted to emphasize that the place makes you feel gloomy, you could also say that: This place makes me feel gloomy.

    What I like about "it gives me a sense of gloom" is that it reminds me of a more common phrase and so it sounds something like a pun: (Common phrase) This place gives me a sense of doom.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2013
  3. jakartaman Senior Member

    Korean
    Thanks, Owlman. Do you guys ever use the noun "gloom" in everyday speech except "gloom and doom"?
     
  4. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    I don't hear "gloom" in speech very often, Jakartaman. When I hear people refer to the idea in conversation, they usually choose the adjective "gloomy".
     
  5. jakartaman Senior Member

    Korean
    OK, thank you, owlman. God bless! :)
     

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