go ask, go to ask, go and ask

Discussion in 'English Only' started by diavoletto69, Jul 31, 2013.

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  1. diavoletto69 Senior Member

    Milan
    Italian
    good morning to everybody,

    is there any difference between these three expressions? Which one is to be preferred?

    I don't know, go ask Paul
    I don't know, go and ask Paul
    I don't know, go to ask Paul

    I would say that the first two are equivalent, probably I would use the third with another verb i.e. "go to buy some bread" but I don't know why, just a feeling.

    Thanks for your help
     
  2. EnglishLearner1990

    EnglishLearner1990 Junior Member

    Iran
    Persian
    The first and the second sentence are equivalent but the first one is usually used in AE. but I didn't see the use of "go" with preposition "to" in the way which you want to say your opinion like this.
     
  3. dadane Senior Member

    New Zealand
    English (London/Essex)
    I would use option #2. Option #1 sounds AE to me, but I don't speak AE so I'm not really in a position to judge. The third option doesn't work.
     
  4. diavoletto69 Senior Member

    Milan
    Italian
    thank you all

    so would you say " please, go to buy some bread" or "go and buy some bread"?
    In this case, "go to" doesn't sound bad to me, but, as I said, it's just a feeling. Am I wrong?
     
  5. dadane Senior Member

    New Zealand
    English (London/Essex)
    Logically thinking, you are correct, it just isn't said like that: It is 'Please go and buy some bread'
     
  6. nebojsa84

    nebojsa84 New Member

    Serbian
    Always first think on your mother tongue, if it is not English, how your would say it... If you ask me: #1 and #2 are usual, on my mother tongue and on English also, because in conversation each of us tries to be more explicit with less words, like we are too much lazy to speak...
     
  7. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Nº 1 may be usual in American English, but it is not usual in British English. I would use nº 2: "I don't know. Go and ask Paul."
     
  8. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Actually, you should never think in your native language first or attempt to compare it with another language!:D That is a very dangerous practice, because languages are structured differently.;) That is presumably why you use 'on' instead of 'in' here (in your mother tongue - in English, not on...;)) and why you say 'too much lazy' instead of too lazy.:)

    1. is usual for an AE speaker (and not all AE speakers, in my experience). I would never say it, as a native speaker of BE. 2. is usual in BE. 3. is technically correct, but we just don't say it like that.;)
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2013
  9. diavoletto69 Senior Member

    Milan
    Italian
    thank you all, now it's perfectly clear to me
     
  10. dadane Senior Member

    New Zealand
    English (London/Essex)
    You're having a mammoth giggle, geez, it's cobblers! This is self-contradictory, in one sentence you have successfully, and conclusively, proved that your theory doesn't work. :D Sorry, but languages just don't work that way.

    PS. Extreme idiomatic usage here is deliberate ... please try and directly translate back to your native tongue and see what you come up with.
     
  11. diavoletto69 Senior Member

    Milan
    Italian
    You're having a mammoth giggle, geez, it's cobblers

    what does it mean?
    :D
     
  12. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Which is basically what I said.;)
     
  13. nebojsa84

    nebojsa84 New Member

    Serbian
    Thank you guys for correcting me... :)
     
  14. dadane Senior Member

    New Zealand
    English (London/Essex)
    Roughly, it means 'you surely can't be serious (in an extreme way, hence 'mammoth', i.e. big), mate, that is nonsense'. Geez is short for geezer, which means 'bloke'. This sentence is slang from start to finish and I used it to make a point to nebojsa84.

    I thought the point needed to be emphasised :).
     
  15. Beryl from Northallerton Moderator

    British English
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