Goodbye or good-bye?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by blackeyes, May 10, 2006.

  1. blackeyes New Member

    Rio de Janeiro
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Hi everyone!

    Maybe it´s a silly question but... :( Why do I see so many times native speakers of English writing either "good-bye" or "good bye" instead of "goodbye" ? I mean, everytime I look it up I can only find this expression as "goodbye". Does it make any difference in meaning? Are both correct?

    Thank you in advance
     
  2. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    Oi Blackeyes,

    My dictionaries disagree with goodbye.

    They list good-by for farewell, and offer good-bye as an alternate spelling.
     
  3. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Seems to have a hyphen in the OED.
    Good-bye:)
     
  4. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod Chicken

    Arizona
    American English
    I think you usually find it as one word because most people don't use the hyphen, even though the dictionary says that they should. :rolleyes:
     
  5. Tatzingo

    Tatzingo Senior Member

    Where on Earth??
    English, UK
    Hi,

    So are we saying that good-bye is the correct spelling?
    If that's the case then i can safely say that i've been spelling it wrong for my whole life...

    goodbye.

    Tatz.
     
  6. mariposita

    mariposita Senior Member

    madrid
    US, English
    A lot of style guides (for newspapers, magazines, websites, etc.) prefer goodbye.
     
  7. Tatzingo

    Tatzingo Senior Member

    Where on Earth??
    English, UK
    Hi,

    I've just checked in my Collins English Dictionary and it confirms that goodbye is spelt without the hyphen.

    Microsoft Word also seems to back me up on this one... though i don't suppose Microsoft ought to be regarded as reliable authority on spelling ;-)

    Tatz.
     
  8. JRM

    JRM Senior Member

    Canada, English
    A question that comes to my mind now is that it is possible to spell it like "good-bye" or "goodbye".

    The hyphen is there for a reason. I think that this word has a history and when they made the word an official word it took on these two forms.

    If you can say it you can spell it.
     
  9. mariposita

    mariposita Senior Member

    madrid
    US, English
    I am almost certain that the Chicago Manual of Style advocates for goodbye, but I don't have it handy to check.
     
  10. mariposita

    mariposita Senior Member

    madrid
    US, English
    I believe that good-bye is an older usage. The tendency (at least in the American writing an editing profession) has been to eliminate hyphens when they don't add clarity or meaning.
     
  11. alahay

    alahay Senior Member

    US
    Phoenicia
    I would like to add that the origin of this word is Godbwye (1573) which is a contraction of "God be with you". Read more...

    Tatzingo, add my whole life to yours in terms of spelling goodbye hyphenlessly.
     
  12. blackeyes New Member

    Rio de Janeiro
    Portuguese - Brazil
    It seems that most of you tend to use "goodbye" then. And I appreciate all the explanations you guys gave me :D especially about the origin of that word (because I love that stuff ):p

    Thank you all :)
     
  13. river Senior Member

    U.S. English
  14. maxiogee Senior Member

    imithe
    River, you sound like Dudley Moore, :) but he didn't use the hyphen, afaik as far as I know.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 23, 2013
  15. j0ckser Junior Member

    Southern part of great white north
    Canadian English/Canada
    i wouldn't I wouldn't use microsoft as a definer either.

    btw, By the way, dictionary.com likes all 4 (per river's post). personally i sway between good-bye and goodbye.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 23, 2013
  16. emma42 Senior Member

    North East USA
    British English
    Chambers has "good-bye", but I have never used a hyphen. Ta-ra.
     
  17. barbirolli New Member

    Greater Manchester
    English-Northern England
    In Confession of Guilt, Ernest Dudley's 1957 thriller broadcast on BBC radio, the spelling of "good-by" is a crucial plot point. The murderess types a false suicide note omitting the "e". Since this is immediately perceived by the detective as odd, but not wrong, this was clearly unusual, even in 1957. However, since "goodby" is not, in British English in my lifetime, used without the hyphen, one can only infer that in 1957, "good-bye" was normal. Nor is this regarded as an Americanism. The murderess is a professional, English, secretary, who would have known how to spell. She says that she had "spelt it like that all my life", which would imply that in the early part of the 20th century, "good-by" was far more common than in the 50s. I have a mind to take this spelling up again!
     
  18. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    No. All it shows is that, for her entire life, she had been mistaken or dogmatically weird... ;) - it happens.

    OED: "Forms: 15 god be wy you, god b'uy, god boye ( yee, 15–16 god buy', buy, godbwye, god bu'y(e, 16 god b'(o)y you, god buy (or buy') you (or ye), -buoy(e, -b'wy, -b'w'y(e, -b'w', -b'y(e, good-buy, -b'wy, 17 good b'w'ye, -b'w'y', bwi't'ye, 17– goodby(e."
    Apart from the chance of being convicted of murder, you would, like the secretary, be in a tiny minority- except, perhaps, in the 17th century.

    The AE Google Ngram viewer when compared to the BE result is interesting
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2013
  19. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    As alahay noted (post 11), the word/phrase has undergone some change:

    14th century: God be with ye
    Fused in the 16th century: Godbwye (various spellings: God be wy you, god b'w'y, godbwye, god buy' ye, and good-b'wy)
    Influenced by 'good morning', 'good night': Good-by
    And thence to good-bye and goodbye.

    Cross-posted
     
  20. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Stoke on Trent
    England and English
    I wonder if the goods in night and morning bear any relationship to God in their etymology?
     
  21. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I don't think so, Suzi. The 'full' form for 'good morning' would be 'I bid you a good morning' or similar. All the sources I looked at suggest that God- in Godbwye gave way to good- by analogy.
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2013
  22. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Stoke on Trent
    England and English
    Thanks!
    :)
     
  23. barbirolli New Member

    Greater Manchester
    English-Northern England
    Certainly. However, I am always happy to be in a tiny minority. It is the story of my life.
     
  24. Uncle Max. Junior Member

    Belgium
    Dutch
    Old English: good-bye
    Modern English: goodbye
    I even think 'goodbye' is the only correct one.

    Uncle Max.
     
  25. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Welcome to the Forum, Uncle Max! :)

    I presume you are not using 'Old English' the way linguists use it to refer to the English of 450 to 1100.
     

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