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goodbye vs. farewell vs. see you vs. see you around

Discussion in 'Deutsch (German)' started by seraphin, Sep 30, 2008.

  1. seraphin New Member

    english
    Does German have the equivalent for the following:
    goodbye (very general, can be an everyday bye, or a permanent farewell)
    farewell (goodbye at departure, usually a longer term to permanent parting)
    see you (very casual, a short departure, soon to see again)
    see you around (very casual, a shorter departure, expected to see again VERY SOON)

    thanks
     
  2. Lykurg

    Lykurg Senior Member

    Hamburg
    German
    Some German equivalents are really close matches, others less...

    goodbye (very general, can be an everyday bye, or a permanent farewell)
    Auf Wiedersehen!

    farewell (goodbye at departure, usually a longer term to permanent parting)
    Gute Reise! / Gute Fahrt! (emphasizing the ride)
    Lebe wohl! (oldfashioned, but possibly the only formal one which fits to permanent parting; less formal: Mach's gut! )

    see you (very casual, a short departure, soon to see again)
    Bis bald! (casual, soon to see again)

    Servus!
    (Southern Germany and Austria, informal; also possible as a greeting)
    Tschüß! (Northern Germany, informal)
    Both regional versions (and there are more) do not expressively state a short departure.

    see you around (very casual, a shorter departure, expected to see again VERY SOON)
    Bis nachher! / Bis später! (both versions: expecting to meet again on the same day)
     
  3. Toadie

    Toadie Senior Member

    Maryland
    English
    "Auf Wiedersehen" literally means upon seeing you again... How could that be used as a permanent farewell?
     
  4. suiker Junior Member

    German(y)
    How can someone say "It's raining cats and dogs" if there is only water falling down on earth?
    If you are leaving a shop for example you can say "Auf wiedersehen" even if you know you are not going to visit this shop again. It's just a polite leave-taking in that case.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2008
  5. Hutschi

    Hutschi Senior Member

    Dresden, Universum
    German, Germany
    This would not be possible if you understand it literally. But it became synonymously to other such formulas. At least it became the standard formula in a neutral sense.

    So it became "Good bye".

    It replaced such formulas as "Ade", "Lebe wohl" and others - and so it can easily used also in this case. So there is "Für immer auf Wiedersehen sagen" - to say farewell forever. (I do not know exactly all connotations of the English forms. So do not take it too exactly. (Lege es nicht auf die Goldwaage.)

    Almost all other formulas are not neatral in the same way. They have another style or are regionally.

    "Ade sagen" also says often "to go forever", but it sounds old fashioned and is used for example in fairy tales.
     
  6. Hutschi

    Hutschi Senior Member

    Dresden, Universum
    German, Germany
    Just some additions to this very good list.


    "Adieu!" I do not know if this is used often. The fixed formula
    "Adieu sagen" means to go forever or for a long unknown time. Regionally also in the form "Adios"

    "Ahoi!" (Sometimes this is used as "good bye!" - in Prague German it is "Hallo" - for example Spejbl and Hurvinek used it, it has some regional usage in Germany in this sense.) As Lycorg says in the next topic
    I corrected it here.


     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2008
  7. Lykurg

    Lykurg Senior Member

    Hamburg
    German
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2008
  8. Hutschi

    Hutschi Senior Member

    Dresden, Universum
    German, Germany
    Thank you for clarifying this. I correct it in my topic.

    See also here:
    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahoi

     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2008
  9. berndf Moderator

    Geneva
    German (Germany)
    I have seen this as well but cannot confirm it from my own experience (I am originally from in Hamburg). Ahoi is always understood to be mariner language.
     
  10. Lykurg

    Lykurg Senior Member

    Hamburg
    German
    So did I, berndf (I came, saw and shook my head^^) - but to quote the same page:
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2008
  11. berndf Moderator

    Geneva
    German (Germany)
    I think the quoted passage does not contradict what you and I said. We were talking about how the word in perceived by ordinary speakers in Northern Germany and not about whether or not it is in current professional use.
     

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