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Gordo versus Grueso

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by L'Inconnu, Jun 13, 2010.

  1. L'Inconnu Senior Member

    US
    English
    Gordo versus Grueso

    I am having trouble understanding the difference between the words ‘gorda’ and ‘gruesa’ in the following dialogue:

    Ianira dice: ¿Sabes Yasmine? La verdad es que para que mi tía se ponga así y me diga todo lo que me ha dicho de tí tienes que haberla montado bastante gorda.

    Yasmine piensa: Digamos más bien que la he montado gruesa, que no es lo mismo.


    Here is my ‘stab’ at it:

    Ianira says: You know Yasmine? The truth is that in order for my aunt to take this position and tell me everything that she has told me about you, you had to have made her rather (mean ?).

    Yasmine thinks: It would be better for us to say that I have made her rather fat, which isn’t the same thing.


    Normally ‘gorda’ and ‘gruesa’ have equivalent meanings, but in this case it seems to be some kind of ‘juego de palabras’. In the first statement ‘montarla gorda’ seems to mean ‘to make her mean’. Whereas, in the second statement ‘montarla gruesa’ seems to mean ‘to make her fat’. Here are the two statements in greater context:


    Señora dice: Yasmine, te presento a mi sobrina Ianira. Ha venido a quedarse a mi cargo ocupando tu puesto de aprendiz. Espero que entiendas que tras tus reiteradas faltas de disciplina no puedo tolerar el tenerte por más tiempo como alumna, Así que desde ahora serás su subordinada. Ianira, explícale a nuesta fámula cuál es su cometido.

    Ianira dice: Encantada, Tía.

    La Señora sale de la sala. Ianira le da una escoba a Yasmine.

    Ianira dice: ¿Sabes Yasmine? La verdad es que para que mi tía se ponga así y me diga todo lo que me ha dicho de tí tienes que haberla montado bastante gorda.

    Yasmine piensa: Digamos más bien que la he montado gruesa, que no es lo mismo.
     
  2. yoliyoli Senior Member

    Spain and spanish
    "montarla gorda" is an expression that means to make a big mess or to kick up a fuss. We also say "armar la gorda". Sometimes it is also used to explain that you are going to do something big, for example if you are talking about a party that you are having and you say: "vamos a montarla gorda", it means that you are going to make a huge party.

    I have never heard "montarla gruesa", maybe it's an expression used in South America. You could translate one as make a big mess or make a fat mess, but I guess it won't make much sense in English. But to tell you the truth, in Spain it doesn't make any sense either.
     
  3. L'Inconnu Senior Member

    US
    English
    Ok, so now I understand what Ianira was saying.

    I presume it follows ‘logically’ from the first line, being a play on the words ‘gorda’ and ‘gruesa’. The trick is to get the same pun to work in English.

    Ianira: ¿Sabes Yasmine? La verdad es que para que mi tía se ponga así y me diga todo lo que me ha dicho de tí tienes que haberla montado bastante gorda.

    Ianira: You know Yasmine? The truth is that in order for my aunt to take this position and tell me everything that she has told me about you, you must have made her one big fat mess.

    Yasmine: Digamos más bien que la he montado gruesa, que no es lo mismo.

    Yasmine: Well, lets just say that actually I made her big and fat, since I am the one who does all the work around here!
     
  4. honeyheart

    honeyheart Senior Member

    Quilmes
    Spanish (Argentina)
    But, is the lady (Ianira's aunt) fat or not?
     
  5. luna_mdq

    luna_mdq Senior Member

    Tandil, Argentina
    castellano - argentina
    No, the lady might be fat, but the dialogue has nothing to do with it.
     
  6. honeyheart

    honeyheart Senior Member

    Quilmes
    Spanish (Argentina)
    Then I don't get it at all. :(
     
  7. yoliyoli Senior Member

    Spain and spanish
    I think you found a good solution and it's also funny.
     
  8. L'Inconnu Senior Member

    US
    English
    Well, actually it’s a comic, so I can see that her aunt isn’t fat at all. I looked up ‘grueso’ in the Word Reference Spanish-English dictionary. Apparently latin americans can use the word to mean 'difficult' or 'complicated'. So, maybe there is a better translation.

    Ianira: ¿Sabes Yasmine? La verdad es que para que mi tía se ponga así y me diga todo lo que me ha dicho de tí tienes que haberla montado bastante gorda.

    Ianira: You know Yasmine? The truth is that in order for my aunt to take this position and tell me everything that she has told me about you, you must have been very naughty.

    Yasmine: Digamos más bien que la he montado gruesa, que no es lo mismo.

    Yasmine: Well, lets just say that I caused some trouble, but I wasn’t as bad as you think.
     
  9. yoliyoli Senior Member

    Spain and spanish
    I liked better the first translation, because you can't translate "montarla gorda" as being naughty, since actually it means to cause a big problem.
    In the text it would be like saying making a big mess (montarla gorda) or making difficulties (montarla gruesa).
     
  10. L'Inconnu Senior Member

    US
    English
    The expression ‘montarla gorda’ is used repeatedly throughout the text, allowing me to infer it's meaning from several different contexts. Basically, Yasmine is a young apprentice, who has been fooling around with magic spells without the sorceress’s express permission. Indeed, she has being causing a lot or problems. Under these same circumstances, however, you could also say that Yasmine was being very mischievous.

    I chose the word ‘naughty’, a synonym for mischievous, because it also implies indecent behavior and, as it turns out, this an erotic story. If you’re bold, you can read it yourself and see if you agree with me. It’s only a 13-page comic, but it illustrates explicit sexual acts that may be offensive to some readers.

    http://www.mediafire.com/?mwjzd2iugyy
     

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