Governor's 'Ball'

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Antonio, Mar 6, 2005.

  1. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    Hi Group,

    After the Oscars, many celebraties went out to different parties, one of the parties, that really caught my eye, was the "Governor's Ball" What does the "Governor's Ball" mean?
     
  2. te gato

    te gato Senior Member

    Calgary, Alberta
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    The "Governors Ball" in this context..is just a party held for the actors and actresses after the "Oscars" are over.. If I remember correctly it is held at the Beverly Hills Hilton...

    te gato;)
     
  3. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng
    Definition

    ball (DANCE)
    [Show phonetics]
    noun [C]
    a large, formal occasion where people dance
    (INFORMAL) A ball is also any very enjoyable experience: "How was your weekend?" "We had a ball!"
    A ballroom is a large room that is used for dancing or other activities.

    (from Cambridge Dictionary of American English)
     
  4. garryknight Senior Member

    Kent, UK
    UK, English
    This reminds me of an old joke. Since it involves a play on words, I'm sure it will be of interest to language students everywhere...

    Ticket-seller: "Tickets for the Policeman's Ball! Tickets for the Policeman's Ball!"
    Passer-by: "Is it a dance?"
    Ticket-seller: "No, it's a raffle."
     
  5. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    But where does this word as slang come from? What is the origin, why you call it "ball"? "We had a ball" I never heard it before, is common to say it in English instead of "We had a blast"
     
  6. te gato

    te gato Senior Member

    Calgary, Alberta
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Antonio;
    Who knows where any of the slang terms come from? Usually they are on the "streets"...
    "We had a ball" is the old version..It is not said too much anymore...it is more common to say "we had a blast"..
    te gato;)
     
  7. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    A "Prom" can be called a "Ball" or not? In what special occasions or specific dates, someone can go to the "Ball"? Can someone please, give me an example to understand the whole picture so far.
     
  8. garryknight Senior Member

    Kent, UK
    UK, English
    I think "we had a ball" implies "we had so much fun it was like going to a ball (a dance)". The word "ball", meaning "dance", comes from the Frence bal, which comes from the Old French baller, which comes from the Late Latin ballare, to dance, which comes from the Green ballizein. I hope this is useful to you.
     
  9. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng

    Oh! Very interesting Garry!! :p


    Definition
    blast (EVENT) noun [C usually singular] US INFORMAL
    an exciting or enjoyable experience or event, often a party:
    You should have come with us last night, we had a real blast!
    (from Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary)
     
  10. Neru Senior Member

    UK - Inglés
    Antonio, think of "baile" too, which also has the same Latin root as the words mentioned above by Gary.
     
  11. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng

    Hi tg! But I think "to have a ball" is not necessarily the same as "to have a blast".
    Anyway, the second one is AmE, maybe that's why you say it is much more used there. ;)
     
  12. te gato

    te gato Senior Member

    Calgary, Alberta
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Antonio;
    The word "Prom" comes from the original word "Promenade"--which is a "Ball or Dance"..For schools they still use the word "Prom" for the Graduating class dance.
    Balls were held a long time ago in history..
    Example:
    the movie "Cinderella"...through the years the word "Ball" has just been changed to "Dance".. "We are going to the Dance tonight"
    te gato;)
     
  13. te gato

    te gato Senior Member

    Calgary, Alberta
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Hi Art;
    Here..where we are a little backwards anyway :D have used the term "to have a blast" meaning to have fun..to have a good time..yadda, yadda..
    The same way we would use "to have a ball"--to have fun, a good time...
    te gato;)
     
  14. Bambino

    Bambino Junior Member

    San Diego, CA, USA
    USA/English
    Hello everyone, I was just looking for something to weigh in on and show off my new avatar.
    Balls, though the term seems old-fashioned, still occur. Take all the Mardi Gras balls that happen in the southern US every year (New Orleans and Mobile at least), or the Exotic Erotic Ball in San Francisco. I'm sure there are others as well. ;)

    Bambino
     
  15. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    According to Art, "ball" is a noun [C] for a large, formal occasion where people dance. What type of dance are we talking about, for a formal occasion? Can you please, give me some examples to understand the use of the word "ball" in this particular definition?
     
  16. Bambino

    Bambino Junior Member

    San Diego, CA, USA
    USA/English
    Antonio, I agreee with Art on that definition of a ball. From my experience, usage of the word "ball" is reserved for very extravagant affairs. For example: Cinderella went to a ball at a castle where there was much fanfare and royalty present.

    Generally, you need to be invited or buy an expensive ticket in order to attend one. Of course someone could organize a small dance and advertise it as a ball just for the fun of it, but that would be the exception, not the rule.

    The only ball I have ever been to was a Mardi Gras ball. It was required that the men wore tuxedos and that the women wore formal evening gowns. These balls are structured affairs where the schedule of events follows a strict tradition of pomp and circumstance. They are usually held in a large municipal auditorium, and in New Orleans, many are held in the Super Dome. The one I went to started out with a formal presentation of the krewe's royalty and officers. Krewe = the mardi gras organization. ex: Krewe of Rex, Krewe of Bacchus, etc. This was followed by the presentation of elaborate short plays/skits. The majority of the ball-goers like me just sat in the audience enjoying the show being put on by the actual krewe members. After the skits were over, we all remained seated while the king and queen had the first dance. They were then joined by the lesser royalty and officers. Finally, the royal subjects (us in the audience) were invited to join them. Shortly after, food and alcohol was made available and it turned into a giant party with multiple live bands, etc., and over the course of the evening, much of the formality was given over to debauchery. :eek: The important things to note are the formality in dress and protocol which are inherent at a ball. The rest was for your entertainment. :)

    Bambino
     
  17. CBFelix

    CBFelix Senior Member

    There is a huge difference between Ball and Dance party..

    Ball is always used for formal parties. For example, if a diplomatic mission in abroad gives a party for their national day, it is called Ball and everybody dress up, men in smoking (tuxedo or black-tie) , women in evening dress (usually long a dark color).

    If you ever get an invitation to a Ball, don’t go there in your blue jean and t-shirt. Dress up nicely, and be ready for boring conversations !!! There won’t be a disco music. Most probably, at the corner, there will be an orchestra playing classic music.

    But, I have to admit that, food in these kind of Balls are always exallent.. Especially, French or Belgium Balls... God ! They can cook... What a fine test.. What a service..
     
  18. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    In what cases, can I say "Ball", a Wedding can be called a "Ball" for exemple? or a "Prom", the Governor's Masion can be called a "Ball" when they have special guests? I just wanna know, in what cases applies the word "Ball" and in what cases not?
     
  19. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English
    Antonio,

    I wouldn't worry too much about knowing when to use the word "ball". A ball is a ball, not a name for another kind of event. Balls normally occur in large cities that can support such an event. They are usually named "Such and Such Ball" and they are large, lavish events. I am not the "ball" type because 1. they are expensive and 2. you normally must be invited. In San Francisco, there is the "Black and White Ball" held every year. You don't need an invitation but it's expensive and you must dress in elegant finery!

    There are also charity balls occasionally. I have never been to a ball nor do I ever plan to :eek: .
     

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