grasería

Discussion in 'Specialized Terminology' started by Ubetense, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. Ubetense

    Ubetense Junior Member

    Úbeda (Jaén) Spain
    English - UK
    I'm struggling to find the meaning of this word. The context is a conversation about fishing on the Paraná Delta, Argentina, and includes the following:

    -¿Se pesca algo?
    -Nada que valga la pena.
    -Va quedando muy poco por aquí. Las redes de las graserías no dejan pasar nada.

    So it suggests some machine or vessel with nets, whether for fishing or another use. Here's my draft:

    Areyou on some fish?”
    “Nothingworth the trouble.”
    “There'sless and less here now. The[grasería] nets let nothing through.”

    Any help here much appreciated.
     
  2. Hakuna Matata

    Hakuna Matata Senior Member

    Español - Argentina
    The grasería is a factory that processes fish to obtain oil and grease (in fact, from any animal). I don't know the exact translation... maybe fish oil factory???
     
  3. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    Maybe "fish oil processor" or "factory ship."

    Just out of curiosity, do you actually say "Are you on some fish?" in the UK?
     
  4. Hakuna Matata

    Hakuna Matata Senior Member

    Español - Argentina
    They are buildings, not ships.

    Las redes de las graserías must be understood as las redes de los barcos que trabajan para las graserías.
     
  5. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    Maybe "the nets of the fish oil processors / fish oil processing plants."
     
  6. Ubetense

    Ubetense Junior Member

    Úbeda (Jaén) Spain
    English - UK
    Many thanks to you both, Hakuna Matata and Chris K. Invaluable help most gratefully received.

    As for being "on some fish", Chris K, I'm using a colloquial register of speech - suitable to the speakers and the time of a novel set in the mid-twentieth century - to indicate the kind of laconic interchange of folk who spend their lives working this solitary world, but at the same time opening this to present-day readers in English, where the phrase will be easily understood. Whether or not fishermen speak - or spoke - in these exact terms, is not significant where the story does not have this kind of documentary intention.

    At least, this is my judgement as the translator; another translator might of course choose very different words.

    Thanks again to you both.
     
  7. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    Of course. I was just wondering whether it's a common UK expression, as I haven't heard it. (In the US we'd say "catching anything?" or "anything biting?" or something like that.)
     
  8. Ubetense

    Ubetense Junior Member

    Úbeda (Jaén) Spain
    English - UK
    We say these things here too, and would also be "correct"; then comes the literary question, and I've answered it like this. Thanks again for your help.
     

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