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Greek: Scapula

Discussion in 'Ελληνικά (Greek)' started by panjabigator, Sep 26, 2006.

  1. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    This is a very odd request, I confess, but I was very curious to what the greek word for scapula was this morning in class. My teacher said that the greek root "omo" means scapula, so I would like to know what the modern greek word is.

    By the way, if you do not know what a scapula.
     
  2. ireney

    ireney Modistra

    U.S.A.
    Greek Greece
    panjabigator I am not sure what your teacher meant!

    The Greek word for scapula is ωμοπλάτη (omoplati). It's made up from two words ώμος (omos) and πλάτη (plati). The first one means "shoulder" and the second one "back" (the upper back part of the human body for instance, the wide part if you wish).

    The omo part has nothing to do with "homo" as in homogenious.

    Ώμος (shoulder), as my dictionary informs me, comes from the Hindoeuorpean route *om-so same as aramaic us, latin umerus, sanskrit amsa (can't do the accents), gothic ams, tohaic antse etc.

    I won't go into the second one's etymology since that's probably of no interest to you :)

    So, you see why I can't understand what your teacher meant? :)
     
  3. Flaminius

    Flaminius coclea mod

    capita Iaponiae
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Scapula once meant shoulder in Latin. Therefore, it is safe to say that Latin scapula and Greek Ώμος meant the same thing.
     
  4. ireney

    ireney Modistra

    U.S.A.
    Greek Greece
    Flaminius what confused me was that the teacher spoke of the root "omo". I just don't understand to what exactly panjabigator's teacher meant.
     
  5. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Sorry Ireney, maybe I should give more context in future:) It is an anatomy class, and my teacher was talking about the attachment of some muscle (no clue which one unfortunately...need to study!) on the scapula. The muscle had the word omo-whatever as a name, and he sometimes talks about the reason behind the name. Sometimes they are bad names, such as the muscle aponeurosis, which has nothing to do with nervous tissue at all. Instead, it means flat tendon, so as you can see, there is no correlation with the name. On the other hand, omo-whatever states that a portion of the muscle originates on the scapula. He said that the greek for Scapula is Omo, and I took that to be the ancient Greek root. I wanted to know the current Greek word, that's all:) Thanks for the info!

    I don't know how you got confused with homo- and such.
     
  6. ireney

    ireney Modistra

    U.S.A.
    Greek Greece
    Ah! Now I get it :)

    Last things first, I didn't confuse it with homo-. That was just a note.

    The word Omos is ancient Greek. The root of it in in IE. You probably got it from the Ancient Greek though. Modern Greek is different from ancient Greek but we haven't changed everything you know ;) :)

    As for Aponeurosis. Well, neuron means/meant sinew too :)
     

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