1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

Guerra del Francès

Discussion in 'Català (Catalan)' started by GeriReshef, May 3, 2013.

  1. GeriReshef

    GeriReshef Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    The war between France and Spain (1808-1814) is called in the Catalan Wikipedia Guerra del Francès.
    What is the exact meaning of it:
    The French man war?
    France war (=the war of France)?
    Something else?
     
  2. Angelo di fuoco Senior Member

    Germany
    Russian & German (GER) bilingual
    The literal meaning is the Frenchman('s) war.
     
  3. merquiades

    merquiades Senior Member

    France
    USA Northeast
    As Angelo said or my favorite: The war of the French. That's all literal though. In English it's called the Peninsular War.
     
  4. GeriReshef

    GeriReshef Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    Thanks to both of you!
    The "French man" is an indirect way to refer personally to Bonaparte
    or in general to Frence (as "The sick man on the Bosphorus" refered to Turkey)?
     
  5. merquiades

    merquiades Senior Member

    France
    USA Northeast
    It didn't jump out to me that it could refer to Bonaparte, but I suppose it definitely could given the historical context, or extended to France in general.
     
  6. Angelo di fuoco Senior Member

    Germany
    Russian & German (GER) bilingual
    If my memory is correct, Napoleon didn't participate in that war personally, but rather sent some of his generals & marshalls and installed his brother Joseph (Pepe Botella) as the new king, so I'm inclined to think it's rather referred to France in general.

    There's "Borodino" a famous (at least, in Russia) poem by Lermontov, which begins as follows:

    "Скажи-ка, дядя, ведь не даром
    Москва, спалённая пожаром,
    Французу отдана?"

    "Tell me, uncle, it's not for nothing that
    Moscow, burnt by the fire,
    has been surrendered to the Frenchman?"

    The difference is that in this case Napoleon was there in person.
     
  7. merquiades

    merquiades Senior Member

    France
    USA Northeast
    You're right, I thought El francès referred to France in general too. Or, perhaps, it could refer to Joseph Bonaparte?
     
  8. GeriReshef

    GeriReshef Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    Now everything is clear.
    Thank you all!
     

Share This Page