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Habiendo.../No habiendo

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by edwood94, Apr 26, 2011.

  1. edwood94 Senior Member

    Español
    Hola de nuevo. Estoy casi seguro de que sí, pero me gustaría confirmar la validez del uso de "There being..." o "There not being..." como comienzo de una frase, como equivalente del español ""Habiendo..." o "No habiendo".Ejemplos:

    "Being knowledge absent, all we could rely on was courage"

    "Not being knowledge, all we could rely on was courage"

    Gracias.
     
  2. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    Knowledge being absent...
    Lacking knowledge...
    In the absence of knowledge...

    There being no knowledge.... no suena bien.
     
  3. capitas

    capitas Senior Member

    Castellón, Spain
    SPANISH SPAIN
    I think that it is not correct. They call it "dangling participle", and basically the rule states that you can only use participles ( present and past participles alone) if the subject is the same as the main sentence.
    Habiendo terminado el partido, llegó la policía. It is correct in Spanish, but not in English.
     
  4. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    No, it's fine.

    The party having ended, the police arrived.

    These are two separate clauses, and there's no confusion about what modifies what. The only connection between them is the sequence in time.

    Here are some examples of true dangling participles:

    After being whipped fiercely, the cook boiled the egg.
    Flitting gaily from flower to flower, the football player watched the bee.


    (from http://www.usu.edu/markdamen/WritingGuide/10dangpt.htm)

    In this case there is confusion about whether, for example, it is "the cook" or "the egg" that is being whipped fiercely.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2011
  5. obz

    obz Senior Member

    Los foros de WR.
    Yankee English
    How about something like;

    With the absence of knowledge, all we could rely on was courage.

    I couldn't agree more. Putting "There be" in the gerund form sounds completely alien to me in English.

    Well, if "The police" are also the subject of "Having finished" it's fine in English as well.
    It's when the subjects are different that it becomes a dangling participle.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dangling_modifier
     
  6. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    It works in some situations, although it is rather literary:

    There being no reason for me to remain in the house any longer, I made my excuses and departed.

    But "there being no knowledge" is very stiff, I agree.
     
  7. obz

    obz Senior Member

    Los foros de WR.
    Yankee English
    To each his own. I would opt to avoid it and say "Since there was no reason..." because you have indeed created a dangling participle by using the gerund here.

    Though as you say, perhaps in a very stiff, literary sense...
    I'm usually more flexible on esoteric or obtuse uses of the languages, but "there being", uff, it just doesn't wash for me.
     
  8. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    I agree, in contemporary English I would say "Since there was..."
     
  9. edwood94 Senior Member

    Español
    Damn, I should go back to basics. My english is getting rusty!

    Thank you very much!
     

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