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Hai Capito v. Capisci

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by AmoL'italiano, Apr 18, 2006.

  1. AmoL'italiano

    AmoL'italiano Senior Member

    Maryland
    English-U.S.
    In this forum I see, "Hai capito?" "Si, ho capito," a lot. Literally this means, "You have understood/You have understanding?" "Yes I have understood/Yes, I have understanding." But I was wondering if this is a lot more common, or more correct than, "Capisci?" "Si, capisco," which makes more sense to me. Grazie!

    Dylan
     
  2. fox71

    fox71 Senior Member

    Pisa
    Pisa
    Dylan, dopo una spiegazione è più comune sentire dire "hai capito?" (o anche solamente "capito?") piuttosto che "capisci?"
     
  3. AmoL'italiano

    AmoL'italiano Senior Member

    Maryland
    English-U.S.
    Grazie fox! :D Ho capito di la tua spiegazione. (Dovrei ho usato il "di" lì?)

    Dylan
     
  4. Jana337

    Jana337 Senior Member

    čeština
    No, capire qualcosa (not capire di qualcosa).

    Jana
     
  5. fox71

    fox71 Senior Member

    Pisa
    Pisa
    "Ho capito DALLA tua spiegazione". però mi dispiace che non so spiegarti il motivo (se esiste...)
    Dylan, "di la" scordatelo! :)
    O meglio in italiano esiste solamente "di là" (però "là" con l'accento) che significa "dall'altra parte"
     
  6. AmoL'italiano

    AmoL'italiano Senior Member

    Maryland
    English-U.S.
    Grazie! And, ha- I forgot I had to use conditional past :-D

    Dylan
     
  7. AmoL'italiano

    AmoL'italiano Senior Member

    Maryland
    English-U.S.
    Cosa vuol dire, "scordatelo" in inglese? Non lo capisco...
    Allora, posso usare, "Ho capito la tua spiegazione," O "Ho capito dalla tua spiegazione"? Tutti e due sono corretto?

    Grazie
    Dylan
     
  8. fox71

    fox71 Senior Member

    Pisa
    Pisa
    Scordatelo= Forget it!
    Sì, tutti e due sono corretti (non "corretto"), forse c'è una piccola differenza di significato, ma non la vuoi sapere, vero? :)
     
  9. AmoL'italiano

    AmoL'italiano Senior Member

    Maryland
    English-U.S.
    Yes.
    Ho capito la tua spiegazione= I have understanding of your explanation.
    Ho capito dalla tua explanation= I gained understandgin FROM your explanation.

    ...More or less...

    Grazie!
    Dylan
     
  10. moodywop Banned

    Southern Italy
    Italian - Italy
    The reason many Americans learning Italian always use "capisci?" instead of "capito?" even in cases where the latter would be more appropriate is the ubiquitous "capeesh" they hear in series like "The Sopranos" and in mafia movies. Like "goombah"(Neapolitan "cumpà", It. "compare) it's an anglicized spelling of the Southern pronunciation of "capisci"(omitting the final vowel).

    If you do a google search for "capeesh" you will get over 30,000 results! There are books like Yo Capeesh: A Guide to Understanding Italian Americans and even a Capeesh restaurant in Brooklyn.

    It's practically impossible to watch a series or film about the mafia without hearing capeesh hundreds of times:D

    These anglicized spellings often make it hard to recognize the original dialect word or phrase. Take :warn: stugatts, for example.

    These are the only three words of this kind I'm aware of. Can our American friends provide some more examples?
     
  11. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    The reason why "capeesh?" is used by Americans and even by Australians (American T.V.) is because so many of the Italians they originally heard it from are from Sicily where capisci? is used.
    Paesan for paesano is another one that is used quite a bit.
     
  12. lsp

    lsp Senior Member

    NY
    US, English
    Tons! Shpett, or ah-shpett (aspetta), :warning: Va fangool , goombah, ri-gote (ricotta), and so on...

    And in last Sunday's Sopranos they kept on using the word for "a woman that a married man keeps on the side," - something like comar???" - but I can't make it out exactly or figure out what's the "real" italian word.
     
  13. valy822

    valy822 Senior Member

    Naples / Milan
    Italy- Italian
    In Neapolitan, cummara (female) but we have also cumpare (male).
    In Italian, the word should be amante??
     
  14. moodywop Banned

    Southern Italy
    Italian - Italy
    It's "comare". Strangely De Mauro, while labelling it "centromeridionale", only gives "godmother", "friend" and "gossip-mongerer" as its meanings. In Neapolitan a "comare" (pronounced "cummar' ") is also, as you say, "the woman the married men keep on the side"

    Edit: Ciao, Valy, ci siamo incrociati. D'altra parte siamo i due "resident experts" di dialetto napoletano:)
     
  15. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    In Sicilian comare is cummari. Paravia also gives neighbour as a meaning.
     

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