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Hai voglia di/a...!

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Paulfromitaly, Jan 27, 2008.

  1. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Hello everybody,

    Sei 30 kg sovrappeso: hai voglia di fare jogging per 5 minuti al giorno (se vuoi dimagrire)!
    You're 30 kg overweight: (5 min jogging a day won't be enough to lose weight!)

    Una casa costa 200,000 Euro: hai voglia di mettere da parte 100 Euro al mese per comprartela!
    A house costs 200,000 Euro: (it's impossible to purchase it by saving up only 100 Euro a month!)

    Questo armadio è enorme: hai voglia di tentare di spostarlo da solo!
    This wardrobe is huge: (you can't move it by yourself!)

    How would you translate "hai voglia di" ?
    Maybe "No point in" ?
    Cheers
     
  2. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    No point in/ not much point in works perfectly here. You can also say isn't going to help, although with the last example no point in fits better.

    You're 30 kg overweight; 5 min jogging a day won't help you lose weight!

    A house costs 200,000 Euro; saving only 100 Euro a month isn't going to help!

    This wardrobe is huge; trying to move it by yourself isn't going to help!
     
  3. giovannino

    giovannino Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    This wouldn't fit in Paul's examples but maybe in some contexts you can...all you like (which is also very close to the original phrase) might work:

    Hai voglia di fare diete su diete! Se non fai un po' di esercizio fisico non dimagrirari mai
    You can keep dieting all you like! Unless you exercise you'll never lose weight

    Hai voglia di strepitare! Non ho intenzione di cambiare idea
    You can scream and shout all you like! I'm not going to change my mind
     
  4. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Thank you guys.

    I still don't know how to translate this, though:
    Questo armadio è enorme: hai voglia di tentare di spostarlo da solo!
    This wardrobe is huge: (Don't even try to move it by yourself, it's way too heavy and you won't even be able to move it by 1 inch)

    Charles's suggestion has a slightly different meaning, I think
    This wardrobe is huge; trying to move it by yourself isn't going to help!
     
  5. prinkle Senior Member

    italy
    Italy native languages English and Italian (dual national)
    In this case I would say "as much as you like"
     
  6. kittykate

    kittykate Senior Member

    Pavia, Italy
    Italy - Italian
    Hi all,

    what about

    This wardrobe is huge: try as you might, you'll never be able to move it

    caterina

    EDIT: I always heard hai voglia a, in Italian. However, De Mauro confirms that both a and di can be used

    2c in loc.pragm., hai v.!, avete v.!, per indicare l’inutilità di insistere in un tentativo: hai v. a chiamarlo, non può sentirti!, avete v. di ripeterlo, non vuole capire!
     
  7. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    As I said in Post 2 your suggestion no point in fits better there.
     
  8. prinkle Senior Member

    italy
    Italy native languages English and Italian (dual national)
    -This wardrobe is huge, there's no point in trying to shift it, it's much too heavy.
    -There's not much point, you can try as much as you like, but this wardrobe is huge and heavy to move.
    -You can try as much as you like but I doubt whether you'll be able to move it, its much too heavy.
     
  9. giovannino

    giovannino Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Yes, I'm aware that's the more correct version, but "you can...all you like" is widely used. An example from a Henry Miller novel:

    [SIZE=-1]You can shout all you like, you have no authority anymore[/SIZE]

    I also thought that maybe "all" was stronger than "as much as" and therefore closer to the Italian phrase.

    Maybe Paul's third example could be translated as "you can try and try(which is really what the Italian phrase means) but you'll never manage to move it by yourself".
     

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