hairline cracks

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by entrapta, Apr 9, 2012.

  1. entrapta

    entrapta Senior Member

    Bologna
    Italian
    hair cracks

    Hi everyone; Si parla di ispezionare il disco frenante di un treno per verificare la presenza di "hair cracks" che ho capito che significa ma non ho idea se esista un termine un po' più tecnico di "incrinature sottili/sottilissime"...Non mi pare di averlo visto da nessuna parte. Qualcuno ne sa qualcosa in più? Grazie.
     
  2. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Premetto che la dicitura corretta è hairline cracks e che un sinonimo è stress fracture (si usa in medicina ma anche in un contesto ingegnerisitico). Ma non mi ricordo come si dice in italiano (la cosa grave è che dovrei saperlo!).:)
     
  3. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
  4. prowlerxpla Senior Member

    Passo Genovese
    Italy Italian
    Stress fracture should be rotture a fatica but it seems me different from hairline cracks che mi sembra siano fratture capillari. or I'm wrong??
    Ciao Pier
     
  5. entrapta

    entrapta Senior Member

    Bologna
    Italian
    Mh...in questo caso non è un termine medico ma ingegneristico... quindi non so se microfratture può andare... forse incrinature come avevo pensato. Ma poi se incontro crack da solo? anche quella è una incrinatura....mah adesso cerco di capirci qualcosa. Forse "crepe sottilissime".
     
  6. Tellure

    Tellure Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
  7. MR1492

    MR1492 Senior Member

    Bowie, MD
    English -USA
    Hairline cracks are very small, fine fractures of materials (metals, stone, etc.) which often precede catastrophic failure. They are especially dangerous in high, speed, rotating machinery, for example, aircraft turbine engine impellers. They are often difficult to find and may require a detailed, technical inspection (x-ray images are often used to find them.)

    Any terms in Italian that deals with breaking or cracking of hair are not correct. Terms dealing with the fracturing of materials are correct. I'm not familiar enough with the technical terms in Italian (where is AlabamaBoy when we need him) but keep in mind that the term hairline crack is descriptive of the damage. Imagine an aircraft engine impeller with a long human hair lying across it. It might be almost invisible to the human eye but a real crack in the material of that small size can cause the destruction of the impeller due to the high forces the impeller has to endure due to the the centripetal acceleration experienced by the impeller.

    Hope this helps.

    Phil
     
  8. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Yes, Phil, I agree.;) Entrapta's talking about brake discs for trains (and I work for a rail engineering company), I honestly can't remember the technical term in Italian, but I'm pretty sure it isn't a microfattura/microlesione (which is more medical terminology, I would say). We really need to find a translation for stress fracture, I think: prowler has suggested "rottura a fatica", which sounds a lot better (and it refers to the fracturing of materials). However, as I said, I don't really know, as I deal with material management, not testing: tomorrow I'll have a word with a colleague of mine who's a test engineer and has inspected more wheels, braking systems, gearboxes and axes for trains than I've had hot dinners!:D

    Entrapta, are we talking about visual checks or fatigue tests here, just as a matter of interest?

    Edit. Qui parlano di danneggiamenti di dischi freno automobilistici e parlano di disci crepati. Forse crepatura va bene....;)
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2012
  9. MR1492

    MR1492 Senior Member

    Bowie, MD
    English -USA
    LC, I couldn't agree more. However, I am almost 100 percent sure I have heard the term hairline fracture used in both the medical field as well as the materials field. Perhaps the similarity of terms in English might also apply in Italian. That is, the materials engineering/metallurgical terms might be microfatture/microlesione as well.

    I think talking to your test engineers will give a definitive answer.

    Phil
     
  10. Matrap

    Matrap Est Mod In Rebus

    Abruzzo, Italy
    Italiano
  11. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    A vedere quel link, sembrerebbe proprio di sì .:)

    Anche Google ci conforta: entrapta, fatti un giro qui.;)
     
  12. Blackman

    Blackman Senior Member

    Island of Sardinia, Italy
    Italiano/Sardo
    In aeronautica le chiamiamo cricche. Talvolta viene aggiunto un inutile micro- per enfasi, ma non ha alcun senso.

    Oops, too late...
     
  13. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Direi che questo conferma la trovata di Matrap!.:)
     
  14. MR1492

    MR1492 Senior Member

    Bowie, MD
    English -USA
    Matrap, LC, and Blackman,

    It looks like the "great minds think alike" theory is alive and well in this Forum!

    Phil
     
  15. entrapta

    entrapta Senior Member

    Bologna
    Italian

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