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Haitian Creole: wrap kon goerge oupoko kon geoge bouda santi mwen vel di masisi masisi sal

Discussion in 'Other Languages' started by lakerstunt101, Mar 15, 2008.

  1. lakerstunt101 New Member

    english
    wrap kon goerge oupoko kon geoge bouda santi mwen vel di masisi masisi sal
     
  2. Flaminius

    Flaminius coclea mod

    capita Iaponiae
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Moderator Note:
    All threads need context and background.

    Words and phrases can have many different meanings. Understanding them depends on where, when and how they are used. When you post a question, please include as much background information and context as you can. If you are not sure what context and background are, please read this post before making further enquiry in this forum.
    A question with no context may get an answer. If the question is straightforward, it may not be a wrong answer.
    But the more context you provide, the better the answers will be. :)

    You are asking a sentence of an unknown language. The need for proper context and background is more vital than usual enquiries for which the target languages are well-understood.

    Regards,
    Flam, OL modo
     
  3. yannalan Senior Member

    france, french, breton
    I would try some creole or marroon black american language.....
     
  4. OldAvatar Senior Member

    Bucharest
    Romanian
    Is it Haitian?
     
  5. yannalan Senior Member

    france, french, breton
    I can't tell you which language it is, but it seems to be a sort of creole... I am presently looking
     
  6. yannalan Senior Member

    france, french, breton
    Laker Stunt, please give context and check spelling...
     
  7. yannalan Senior Member

    france, french, breton
    It looks like haitian creole, but it seems you made some mistakes when copying it, and it is difficult to translate.
     
  8. Namakemono

    Namakemono Senior Member

    Galicia, España
    Español, gallego (España)
    Could be a scam. Did you get that from an auction site?
     
  9. HistofEng Senior Member

    New York
    USA Eng, Haitian-Creole
    It indeed is Haitian-Creole, but the sentence is somewhat unintelligible, and it has some vulgar language!

    I have no idea what "wrap" is. "goerge" and "geoge" must be a mispelling of the name "george".
     
  10. yannalan Senior Member

    france, french, breton
    Yes,, I think so too. I think it is "bonda" instead "bouda" too.
    Masisi is a sort of vegetable, no ?
    i dis not find any "oupoko" or "upoko" Have you any idea ?
     
  11. HistofEng Senior Member

    New York
    USA Eng, Haitian-Creole
    No, it is "bouda".

    No, it's a deragatory word for gay men.


    "oupoko" is most likely "ou poko" which is "you haven't already.." or "you haven't yet.."
     
  12. tom_in_bahia Senior Member

    Teixeira de Freitas, BA, Brasil
    South Florida/Phoenix-Tucson/the Adirondacks. Native of North American English
    Without punctuation it is very hard to tell because Haitian creole is very word-order rigid when it comes to meaning. So, for example, without context I can't tell whether "mwen" is the subject pronoun (I) or the possessive pronoun (my) because I can't establish the meaning without the right pauses.

    Nearest I can tell it should be:

    W'ap konn goje ou poko konn goje bounda santi mwen vle di masisi masisi sal.

    Which means:

    You're used to swallowing; you aren't used to swallowing (my) smelly ass yet...(I) mean [want to say] faggot, dirty faggot.

    That's my best translation with the OP's horrible punctuation and spelling. And what a wonderful message of love, compassion and acceptance of diversity.
     
  13. tom_in_bahia Senior Member

    Teixeira de Freitas, BA, Brasil
    South Florida/Phoenix-Tucson/the Adirondacks. Native of North American English
    Free standing "u" doesn't exist in any standard Haitian Creole word.

    OU =/u/
    O = /o/
    `O (accent ague) = /open o/

    French "u" /y/ tipically becomes "i" /i/ in Haitian Creole.
    French "ou" /u/ tipically stays "ou" /u/ in Haitian Creole.

    So, really ou is a digraph vowel, where u simply serves the purpose of changing the pronunciation of o.
     
  14. yannalan Senior Member

    france, french, breton
    t
    Thank you Tom, I did not psot that originally, but I wanted to be sure it was creole and I was intrigued. Sure, the sentece is awful......
     
  15. tom_in_bahia Senior Member

    Teixeira de Freitas, BA, Brasil
    South Florida/Phoenix-Tucson/the Adirondacks. Native of North American English
    Thanks...I'm glad some people are taking an interest in Haitian Creole. I lived surrounded by it for much of my life in Florida and it's a widely spoken language. Unfortunately, Haiti is socio-economically diglossic and French is the "prestige language", even though many Haitians only have a cursory knowledge of French. Meanwhile, there seems to be a lot of confusion over how the standard language should be written (what letters, what diacritics). I've yet to see a Haitian dictionary that doesn't confuse the digraph ch with sh; and I also haven't seen one that doesn't make the error of incorrect accent placement. There's confusion over the w-r situation (which to use for French initial or medial r).

    Influence of French often allows the use of "c" (without the h) and "qu" for /k/, when technically, "k" is the only letter that should be used for /k/. I've also seen x used in some words, when ks is used in others. I think that standardization of some sort is necessary to start seeing Haitian Creole become its own language (Ayisyen or Kweyol or whatever name they decide)...I think Creole needs to eventually be dropped from the name though, because eventually it's not going to be a creole anymore. Many languages that are considered their own with literary traditions and long history were Creoles at one time (arguably French itself). People need to see the language that Haitians speak as a contemporary, typical language with complex grammar rules and not an infantile-jungle French spoken by simple people (and argument that I think has serious racist implications about the language of Black Africans and peoples around the world of the African diaspora). I think someone should translate major literary works into Kweyol to foster creative writing in the native Haitian population, instead of self-hating that causes some Haitians to say that they speak "French" and not "Creole".

    Sorry for the rant...this is just how I feel about this subject.
     
  16. yannalan Senior Member

    france, french, breton
    I agree with you, that 's a problem that every other languege than french meets in France. I'm living in Brittnay(western france) and our celtic language is fading away onb the same basis. Yours is alive and well, don't loose time !
    About writing, I think you should have a look at Martinique and Guadeloupe, they have now creole teachers, and maybe they have a standard written language. I know sme anitilian writters did write novels.
    I understand
     
  17. yannalan Senior Member

    france, french, breton
    I agree with you, that 's a problem that every other languege than french meets in France. I'm living in Brittnay(western france) and our celtic language is fading away onb the same basis. Yours is alive and well, don't loose time !
    About writing, I think you should have a look at Martinique and Guadeloupe, they have now creole teachers, and maybe they have a standard written language. I know sme anitilian writters did write novels.
    I understand it is not the same créole which is spoken in Haiti and in french islands, but nevertheless, whan french soliders were sent to Haiti, the martiniquese and Guadelupean were able to translate after a while.
    The problem will be : will each island work on its own creole or will the creole wrtiers and lovers unite to get a basis ?
     
  18. sug56 New Member

    english, creole, french
    Hello,
    I am a native creole speaker. "wrap kon goerge" is a popular phrase used to express like you'll see soon enough or you'll be shocked. Litterally translated to your going to know george.
    The rest is vulgar. Oupoko kon geoge, is you don't know geoge, literally, meaning you have know idea loosely.
    Bouda santi, is a vulgar way of saying smelly but, closer to smelly ass.
    Mwen vel di masisi sal means I want to say dirty gay.
     
  19. divina Senior Member

    Norristown, PA
    English, U.S.
    So, is the "george" part of the phrase, or addressing someone named george?
     
  20. PRaymond New Member

    New England, USA
    Haitian Creole
    "W-ap kon' George, ou poko Kon' George" (You'll meet George, you don't know George yet) sounds like one of the hundred of kreyol expressions that are adopted yearly in Haiti; As explained before by sug56, it would mean:"I'll teach you a lesson" to someone you're mad at. I would not be surprised if George was the name of a real person with authority that everyone was afraid of. The rest of the sentence reinforces that, because it is nothing but vulgar and derogatory language. Bouda santi(stinky ass) is what you would say to someone to express that they have not showered for days. Masisi sal literally means dirty gay(man). Some Haitians(not all) would denigrate others by calling them gay(masisi) or madivine(lesbian) even though they have no knowledge of the person's sexuality. Homosexuality is still very taboo in the caribbean nation as it is in multiple other countries. There have been recently numerous demonstrations around the country against same-sex marriages.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2014
  21. divina Senior Member

    Norristown, PA
    English, U.S.
    I found out awhile ago, the "George" is actually for Hurricane George!
     
  22. PRaymond New Member

    New England, USA
    Haitian Creole
    Interesting, that's in reference to the power of the hurricane and the devastation in can cause.
    Thanks!
     

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