hard-pressed

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by jolandarte, Jan 3, 2013.

  1. jolandarte Junior Member

    italian
    AriCiao! (Ultimamente ho un po' di problemi con l'inglese!:p)

    La frase e il contesto sono i seguenti: "Sir, I wonder which dictionary you refer to for definitions of things like 'wrong'? As a hard-pressed journalist, I have always used what is probably the worst dictionary ever published, the 1986 Belgian Academy Guide to Pidgin English. It can be guaranteed to back me up every time, no matter how bad my mistake is. So when people write in to tell me that I have used a word wrong, I simply write back: 'Not according to my dictionary'. This always refutes them (My dictionary gives refute as: ' To tell one fella person to shovel off, to give him a big, bad mouth, to bamfoozle'..."

    ...In qualità di giornalista pieno di lavoro/alle strette/sotto pressione , ho sempre usato quello che è probabilmente il peggior dizionario mai pubblicato...

    Il problema, come avrete capito è hard-pressed. Come tutti i giornalisti, questo qui sarà stressato e pressato dalla fretta: ho almeno interpretato bene il concetto secondo voi? Quale credete che sia il termine più adatto? Avete qualche altro suggerimento?

    Grazie come sempre!
    Roberta
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 3, 2013
  2. code2004

    code2004 New Member

    Bradford, England
    English (U.K.)
    Hey Jolandarte!

    I don't really feel that 'hard-pressed' has a distinct element of haste. I believe it's more towards a general sense of difficulty (particularly financial). See www.thefreedictionary.com/hard-pressed for a better definition.

    Given the context, one is more likely to infer that the journalist is having financial difficulties. If you do wish to denote stress and haste, try 'overwhelmed' ('as an overwhelmed journalist' <=> 'as a journalist with an overwhelming workload').
     
  3. Giorgio Spizzi Senior Member

    Italian
    Ciao, jola,

    hard-pressed
    = adj. experiencing severe and continual difficulties.

    Come puoi vedere "ci sta dentro di tutto".

    GS :)
     
  4. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    Since the journalist says that he has always used the worst dictionary ever published just after using that expression, I'm inclined to think it's referring to financial difficulty (like code).
     
  5. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    I agree with this interpretation. He has a lot of work, deadlines to meet, and doesn't want to be bothered by people telling him his language is wrong, so he bases himself on a dictionary, the worst ever published, which always puts him in the right. I don't think he bought it to save money! And obviously it's a humorous comment.
     
  6. code2004

    code2004 New Member

    Bradford, England
    English (U.K.)
    I get it now! One might still misconstrue -- but I see how it's intended. Colpa mia :3.
     
  7. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    Yes, you're probably right, Einstein. :)
     
  8. elfa

    elfa Senior Member

    Bath, England
    English
    I agree with Einstein. "Hard-pressed" here in the sense of having deadlines to meet and being time-pressured. He uses the worst dictionary in the world as back-up for all the mistakes he may have made.
     
  9. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    And a quick Google search suggests that the dictionary is fictitious (the only reference is this thread!). The whole thing is a joke.
    Nothing's impossibile, but it's quite unlikely that the Belgian Academy would publish a Guide to Pidgin English.
     
  10. jolandarte Junior Member

    italian
    Thank you all!!
    This was really helpful!:thumbsup: :)

    At the beginning I thought that "financial difficulties" could have been the right one, because it made sense he couldn't afford a better dictionary, but after Einstein's post I see the whole joke!
    He rather saves time by using a (fake) dictionary which justifies all the mistakes!
    Moreover through Code's link I also found these other definitions:
    - subject to severe competition- subject to severe attack

    So, I think "alle strette" or "sotto pressione" could be good options.
     

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