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hardline or landline phone

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Jayani Isha, Apr 16, 2006.

  1. Jayani Isha

    Jayani Isha Senior Member

    Santiago
    Spanish-Chile
    Hi Forum,

    I'm working on a translation and I came to "Telefonia fija". As far as I have been able to find out, in the States is Hardline and in the UK is landline. As the book I'm working in, must be written in an international English, I'd like you to suggest the most appropiate for world understanding.

    Thanks,
     
  2. cubaMania Senior Member

    Hello Jayani Isha,
    Here in the USA it is normally "landline." In fact I have never heard the word "hardline" in connection with telephones.
     
  3. Jobani

    Jobani Senior Member

    New York City
    Spanish-Dominican Rep.
    Hello Jayani Isha,

    I can personally attest that in New York City we say "landline phone". And since New York is a 'melting pot' of international cultures, it is safe to say that the appropriate term all-around is landline phone.

    Bye.
     
  4. Jayani Isha

    Jayani Isha Senior Member

    Santiago
    Spanish-Chile
    Thanks, I actually found hardline in verizon web page and in others, I can remember right now. Any way. Thanks a lot. I'll use landline.

    :thumbsup:
     
  5. Tresley

    Tresley Senior Member

    Yorkshire / United Kingdom
    British English
    "Landline" is fine in the UK. I would definitely understand that.
    "Hardline" is something that I would NOT understand.
     
  6. Jayani Isha

    Jayani Isha Senior Member

    Santiago
    Spanish-Chile
    Thanks Tresley. I'll use that one.
     
  7. Tresley

    Tresley Senior Member

    Yorkshire / United Kingdom
    British English
    If it mentions 'mobile' phones in your translation, be careful! My American friend calls them 'cell' phones. We never say that in the UK. The first time he said 'cell' phone to me, I thought that it was something used in a prison! (i.e. prison cell).

    If 'mobile' phones are in your translation, you might have to put 'mobile(cell) phones' in the text to make it clear to all English speakers.
     
  8. Jayani Isha

    Jayani Isha Senior Member

    Santiago
    Spanish-Chile
    You made me laugh!!! that was a good one. Actually in Chile we say Telefono celular, commonly say just celular, or simple "celu". I've been working this word for long, and in the states is well known as mobile too.

    Thanks fot you quote.
     
  9. djb Senior Member

    USA - English
    Tresley,
    "Mobile" is becoming increasingly popular in the US, and I'd say most people would recognize it in urban areas. "Cell phone" comes from "cellular phone", which was the original name for portable phones. Each antenna covered a limited area called a "cell", and as you drove, your phone would switch from cell to cell for coverage. One of the first major providers of service was Cellular One, which might be why the name stuck.

    Because of the ubiquitous nature of mobile phones, most people nowadays just call it their "phone", rather than their "mobile" or "cell", but "cell phone" is still recognized by everyone in the US.
     
  10. Tresley

    Tresley Senior Member

    Yorkshire / United Kingdom
    British English
    Hiya Djb!

    Thank you very much for the explanation. I never realised or understood why my American friend called his 'mobile' phone a 'cell' phone. The 'prison' connection was my first thought, then I (wrongly NOW, according to your explanation) thought that it might have been the battery cell inside it!! Thank you for telling me why they are known as 'cell' phones over there.
     

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