has had> typhoid

Discussion in 'English Only' started by commotion, Dec 13, 2013.

  1. commotion Junior Member

    hindi
    I have had headache since morning.
    This means he has been having headache.
    And If you have had hepatitis A, it will come in test result.
    Does it mean the person had or still have typhoid if yes then what is the difference if we use ' If you have typhoid.....'?
     
  2. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    If you tell me that someone has had typhoid, then I will think that they no longer have it, but are now well.
     
  3. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    Or that they still have it:

    She has had a bad cold all weekend.
     
  4. Parla Senior Member

    New York City
    English - US
    You're right about the cold, but when it comes to typhoid and testing for a past case, I agree with Cagey.
     
  5. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    Commotion,

    It may help you if you

    I have had a headache since morning. = I have suffered from a headache since morning.
    This means he has been having a headache. = This means he has been suffering from a headache.
    And If you have had hepatitis A, it will come show up in test result. = And If you have suffered from hepatitis A, it will come show up in test result.
     
  6. roxcyn

    roxcyn Senior Member

    USA
    American English [AmE]
    You could say "it will come up in a test result."

    Those are generalization, if you've had X before it will show up on a test result. We assume the person is cured.
     
  7. commotion Junior Member

    hindi
    I have also heard as for in the form which is permanent you can use have had.
    example: George has had a great series.(said when serie of matches are not yet finished.like 7 match series and it is said in 4th match).
    Australia have had support everwhere they play.(everwhere in world they have supporters)
    Australia have had support everwhere they played.(everwhere in world they had supporters)
    I think we can not use,"Australia have been having a support everwhere they play".
     
  8. Thomas Tompion Senior Member

    Southwest France
    English - England
    Hello Commotion,

    I hope that someone has made clear to you that use of the present perfect (eg. I have + past participle) has different meanings 1. when used in a clause using since and a time reference and 2. when not used with since.

    This may explain the apparently conflicting advice you have been getting.

    1. when used in a clause using since.

    I have had shingles since 2010 -
    you still have the shingles which started in 2010.

    The present perfect used with since and a time reference indicates that what you say applies over the time from the time reference up to now, and remains true now.

    2. when not used with since.

    I have had shingles -
    you no longer have shingles, but have suffered from it in the course of your life.

    When not used with since the present perfect often indicates what events are part of your present record of experience.


    When you consider the advice you are being given, look carefully to see which of the two circumstances is being considered.
     

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