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has long since become?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Xander2024, Jan 6, 2011.

  1. Xander2024 Senior Member

    Southern Russia
    Russian
    Hello again,

    Would someone please tell me which of the two sentences is more correct/natural or maybe come up with their own version:

    "English has long since become/been(?) a must for every educated person in the world"
    "English has been for a long time now a must for every educated person in the world".

    I'm fully aware that the sentences above look and sound rather clumsy but I hope you understand what I'm trying to convey by saying this.

    Thank you so much.
     
  2. SwissPete

    SwissPete Senior Member

    94044 USA
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    My suggestion:

    ...English has long been a requirement for educated people in the world.
     
  3. Xander2024 Senior Member

    Southern Russia
    Russian
    Thanks, SwissPete.
    True, I'd never have thought of using "a requirement" instead of "a must".
     
  4. Tazzler Senior Member

    Maryland
    American English
    They mean different things to me. "must" refers more to convenience or something that makes things easier. "requirement" is weird in this sense because we're left wondering what it is that's putting forward the requirement that one know English. A requirement is made by something of authority, and in this case are educated people required by some power to know English? So that's why I disagree with Pete in that word choice.

    And yes I understand what you're trying to say. For the second sentence, I would move the "for a long time now " to the end of the sentence.
     
  5. Fabulist Senior Member

    Annandale, Virginia, USA
    American English
    1. "English has long since become a must for every educated person in the world."
    2. "English has long since been a must for every educated person in the world."
    3. "English has been for a long time now a must for every educated person in the world".

    Apart from the voguish use of the verb "must" as a noun for "requirement" or "necessity," all three proposed sentences are grammatical English. They don't require punctuation, but without it I find them wordy and a little hard to grasp. I don't think the second one needs "since"; dropping it would help. Ditto for "now" in the third sentence. But I think some rearrangement and editing would leave me less exhausted by the time I reached the period:

    1. "Long ago, English became a necessity for every educated person in the world."
    2. "For a long time, English has been a requirement for every educated person in the world."
    3. Same as 2.
     
  6. Xander2024 Senior Member

    Southern Russia
    Russian
    Thank you so much, Tazzler and Fabulist.
     

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