Have a blessed day.

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by BriMarie01, Oct 3, 2007.

  1. BriMarie01

    BriMarie01 Junior Member

    U.S./English
    I know how to say "May you have a good day"
    Que tengas un buen día.
    But to say "May you have a blessed day"
    Que tengas un día bendito.

    That doesn't sound right to me. What's the best way of saying it?
    (Without saying "Que Dios te bendiga"...)
     
  2. laydiC

    laydiC Senior Member

    Spain
    Puerto Rico, USA spanglish
    La verdad que esa expresión no se utiliza en español. Se diría: 'Que tengas un lindo día' o 'Que tenga un buen día'.
     
  3. K-Milla

    K-Milla Senior Member

    Mexico
    Mexico-Spanish
    De acuerdo con LaydiC. En todo caso, si es religioso, sería "Que Dios te bendiga" o "Ve con Dios"; si quieres evitar esa connotación, es mejor decir "Que tengas un buen día".
     
  4. Dominican Translator

    Dominican Translator Senior Member

    Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
    Dominican Republic - Spanish
    Aqui (Republica Dominicana) se utiliza mucho entre personas de mucha fé 'Que tengas un dia de bendiciones"
     
  5. BriMarie01

    BriMarie01 Junior Member

    U.S./English
    thank you all for your input.
    I was hoping to keep the connotation of Dios te bendiga, but was looking for a phrase more in line with the structure of Have a blessed day.
    Que tengas un dia de bendiciones...may work ok for me.

    Thank you.
     
  6. LoveFifteen

    LoveFifteen Senior Member

    Washington, DC
    English - USA
    Although you can translate the hideous lovely phrase "Have a blessed day!" into Spanish, it's just going to sound weird and fake to a Spanish native speaker. Unlike the American South and Midwest, Latin America has not yet been ruined "blessed" by pervasive evangelical Christianity.

    When I was a waiter, I would always groan internally when my customers said goodbye with "Have a blessed day!". I knew a paltry tip and a tract were waiting for me at the table.
     
  7. mnewcomb71 Senior Member

    Detroit, MI
    USA - English
    I have spent time in Spain, Mexico, Costa Rica, and Honduras, and no one looks at me funny when I say "Bendiciones para tu día".

    As for it sounding weird and fake...taking that statement with LoveFifteen's further statements, it seems to be a personal prejudice more than anything else. In fact, I personally find your statements utterly insulting.

    I always say "Have a blessed day!" and a 20% tip if the service was worth it.
     
  8. woolduck New Member

    United States
     
  9. woolduck New Member

    United States
    The reason I checked this site is that my wife was writing a personal note in a Christmas card to the Spanish speaking parents of a previous patient of hers (she is a neo-natal intensive care nurse). She often keeps in touch with the families of babies and buys the babies an outfit when they leave for home. She learned Spanish so she can speak to the parents of many of her patients. So this would be a well-received card.

    We know they are people of faith and my wife wanted to say have a happy and blessed Christmas. She said "Ojala que tengan una Navidad feliz y bendita." They have been in the USA for a few years and know of our culture. Would this been received as an odd expression or would they get the jist of the meaning?

    Also, culturally, since we are of evangelical background, would that ruin the blessing she gave them? Because of her faith my wife gives more and does more for her babies and their families. I retired early from a lucrative career to full-time volunteer-teach Spanish-speaking immigrants English for a Catholic Hispanic center. That was a direct result of my evangelical faith. We never hand out tracts. I never try to change the culture or religion of the people I teach nor does my wife do that for her patients and families. We always tip 20% because servers usually need the money. So I need to know if our asking a Latino to have a blessed Christmas is a cultural insult. Let me know how you think on this issue. Language and culture are intermixed and I am interested in your opinion.

    Beyond the language issue, I suggest that LoveFifteen learn to get to know more individuals of a group before criticizing the whole group. I think that is called prejudice and can even lead to bigotry. It is dangerous to generalize like that. May you be blessed by whatever you trust in.
     
  10. Dominican Translator

    Dominican Translator Senior Member

    Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
    Dominican Republic - Spanish
    Hello Wooluck:
    To wish a Latino a blessed X mas is not an insult at all. In fact, is a well received message:

    The correct phrase in Sapnis would be: Que tengan una Navidad feliz y llena de bendiciones.....

    Good luck with your wife's Xmas card and God bless you for the good work you guys are doing. Have a Merry Xmas (I know you will!!!)

    DT
     
  11. Alisterio

    Alisterio Senior Member

    Mexico City
    UK English
    Do you really even say this in English? I can honestly say that this is the first time I've ever heard it - it's certainly not a common expression in British English. We'd say something like "Have a nice day" or a good day or a great day, but never a blessed day...
     
  12. Dominican Translator

    Dominican Translator Senior Member

    Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
    Dominican Republic - Spanish
    Alisterio, as I said before we don't say 'que tengas un dia bendito' but QUE TENGAS UN DIA DE BENDICIONES.
    In fact, I say it myself very often.
    At least in my country is a very common phrase.
    DT:)
     
  13. woolduck New Member

    United States
    Thanks to Dominican Translator. My wife is changing the greeting right now. I appreciate your attention to this issue. I teach my students about American culture and how to be polite in it so they will be treated better. When we use Spanish we want to be culturally polite as well. This helps a lot.
     
  14. Dominican Translator

    Dominican Translator Senior Member

    Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
    Dominican Republic - Spanish
    My pleasure Woolduck. Glad to be of help.
    Regards to your wife.
    DT

    I wish I have more time to reply to some forum threads. It's very interesting to see the feedback you get!
     

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