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Have a [good day, good trip, etc]

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Xavier da Silva, Mar 9, 2012.

  1. Xavier da Silva Senior Member

    Portuguese
    Hello everyone,


    I know that you can use the verb "have" to wish somebody something good, for example: have a good day, have a good trip, have a good vacation, etc. Now, I'd like to know if the examples below sound idiomatic/commom in English. If not, what do you suggest? Please take a look.

    a. Have a good party. [= I wish you a good time at the party.]
    b. Have a good reading. [ = I wish you a good time during your reading.]
    c. Have good studying. [= I wish you a good time during your studying.]


    Thank you in advance!
     
  2. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    a. Have a good party. [= I wish you a good time at the party.] :tick:
    b. Have a good reading. [ = I wish you a good time during your reading.]
    c. Have good time studying. [= I wish you a good time during your studying.]
     
  3. Xavier da Silva Senior Member

    Portuguese
    Thank you very much.

    One last question: Could I say "have a good work" in the context above mentioned: wish somebody something good. ?


    Thank you in advance!
     
  4. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    No. "Have a good work" doesn't work. You could say "Have a good day at work."
     
  5. Googlybear1234 New Member

    English
    Why not?
     
  6. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Because there is no relevant concept of "a work".
    There is such a concept of "a day" or "a party".
     

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