have snucked or snuck

Discussion in 'English Only' started by newname, Apr 16, 2010.

  1. newname Senior Member

    Vietnamese
    Which one is "more" correct?

    The third group tends to think in terms of flat files and the underlying disk structure used to hold data. Though these people are probably in the minority these days, their terms file, record, and field ________ into database nomenclature and stuck/stucked.

    1. have snucked/stuck
    2. have snucked/ (have) stucked
    3. snuck/stuck

    The answer is 3. I think it should be 2.

    Thank you.
     
  2. Brioche

    Brioche Senior Member

    Adelaide
    Australia English
    "snuck" is a non-standard or dialectal form of sneaked.

    Thus
    I saw him sneak behind the shed.
    When he knew the teacher was coming, he snuck behind the shed.
    He has snuck behind the shed again.
     
  3. boozer Senior Member

    Bulgaria
    Bulgarian
    How can it be 2)?
    Both snuck and stuck are already past forms so they don't need the -ed at the end. I don't think words like snucked and stucked exist... (Even the spell-checker underlines them in red :) )
     
  4. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    "Snucked" is not a standard form in any variety of English, so "have snucked" cannot be a correct answer.

    In general, sneaked is standard in British English, while snuck is unacceptable, or used only in informal contexts. Both sneaked and snuck are are used American English. You can read more about it here: People who have more to say on the subject may add to that thread. Please confine your responses on this thread to the options offered.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2010
  5. newname Senior Member

    Vietnamese
    Thank you all.

    I did not know Americans use this snuck.
    I am so ashamed.

    Thank you.
     
  6. Brioche

    Brioche Senior Member

    Adelaide
    Australia English
    Don't be ashamed. There is nothing to be ashamed about.
    You cannot know anything unless you ask and someone tells you.
     
  7. mplsray Senior Member

    The American Dialect Society's Dialect Notes, Vol. 1, 1896, has the following entry on page 62:

    So it does, or at least at one time did, exist.

    I see that it is used in a modern novel (one set in Canada in 1859). Elijah of Buxton by Christopher Paul Curtis, 2009, has "I whirled 'round and at the same time picked up a stone ready to chunk whoever it was that had snucked up on me." We must, of course, take dialect representations in fiction with a grain of salt.

    As for stucked, it also was once part of American English.

    Americanisms: The English of the New World, by Maximilian Schele de Vere, 1872, has the following on page 638:

     
  8. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    You have nothing to apologize for.

    In some cases, British and American English follow different rules. The differences are interesting. Neither set of rules is wrong. No one should apologize for following the rules for the variety of English they speak or are learning.

    You want to learn the rules for the kind of English you are being taught. It seems that the person who wrote the exercise was following American rules. Perhaps that is the variety of English you are being taught.

    Added: As mplsray's interesting post points out, there have also been changes over time. These are interesting to know about, even though these older uses are not considered standard now.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2010
  9. Hermione Golightly

    Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    SW London
    British English
    Hello newname :)

    There's no reason at all to feel ashamed for not knowing something.
    I see your question is just about 'sneak', but to choose the correct answer you need to consider the irregular verb 'stick' as well. Is (have) 'stucked', as in option (2), correct?

    Ideally the person teaching you should know about the differences between American and British English and should certainly know which variety s/he is teaching.

    I will have to look at the thread Cagey links to to find out how acceptable 'snuck' is.

    About the suggested informal use of snuck in British English I would say it is never used in Br E.

    I have heard it only once and that was from a child very recently returned from a holiday in Vermont USA. She was also using another centuries-old English form 'dove', the past/ participle of 'dive' that we no longer use, just as we no longer use 'snuck' as the past/participle of sneak.



    :)

    Hermione
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2010
  10. boozer Senior Member

    Bulgaria
    Bulgarian
    Ha, that really is interesting! I never suspected "snuck" and "stuck" could be verbs in their own right :eek: In fact, I only knew of the existence of the word "snuck" as a past-tense form of "sneak" but I had never used it. Maybe because in my part of the world BE is the dominant variety :)

    On the other hand, I do use other "centuries-old" forms like "dove" and always thought people saying "dived" were simply wrong :eek:
     
  11. Hermione Golightly

    Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    SW London
    British English
    I only know them as the simple past or past participles of sneak and stick with 'snuck' being AmE and 'sneaked' nowadays being BrE, for some sad reason. Stick apparently escaped unharmed.

    :)

    Hermione
     

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