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Have you two fixed on a date for the wedding yet?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by VikNikSor, Jan 8, 2013.

  1. VikNikSor

    VikNikSor Senior Member

    Russian
    There are many online-dictionaries where this phrase is.
    e.g. here
    I wonder, what does 'two' mean here? Is that something like 'both' ?

    Thank you.
     
  2. Hau Ruck

    Hau Ruck Senior Member

    United States - Midwest
    English - U.S.
    Yes, "the two of you" (both of you).

    It sounds like someone is asking the groom and bride to be (husband and wife to be) if they have a date set yet.
     
  3. VikNikSor

    VikNikSor Senior Member

    Russian
    Thank you!
     
  4. Hau Ruck

    Hau Ruck Senior Member

    United States - Midwest
    English - U.S.
    You are welcome. :)
     
  5. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    Correct. The number of people in a marriage in our culture is two. :rolleyes:

    As a side note, I would say "set" rather than "fixed," as Filsmith suggests.
     
  6. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    I agree with the other posters that it's "something like" 'both' - but 'both', for me, wouldn't work in that sentence.

    Have you both fixed [on] a date for the wedding yet? would imply, to me, "I know that one of you has fixed a date - but has the other one fixed a date too?"
     
  7. JustKate

    JustKate Moderate Mod

    I think you're right, Loob. "You two" here makes it clear that the speaker is asking these two people if they as a couple have set a date. They are being treated as...as a unit, I guess I'd say.
     
  8. VikNikSor

    VikNikSor Senior Member

    Russian
    Thank you, I understand now.
    But at first I doubted whether or not 'Have you two' is correct. Because this phrase is not from a 'en-en' dictionary
     
  9. Hau Ruck

    Hau Ruck Senior Member

    United States - Midwest
    English - U.S.
    An interesting thought.

    I read it has "have you both (come together in agreement - two individuals coming to a decision together) set a date yet (for the wedding)?"

    I would just assume that the speaker is wondering if the two individuals have come to an agreed date.

    "Have you both decided a name for the (unborn) baby?"
    (Have you two individuals talked and come to some set agreement about a name?)
     
  10. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    We can say...

    Have you two done X? [= Have the two of you done X?]
    Have you three done X? [= Have the three of you done X?]
    Have you four done X? [= Have the four of you done X?]

    and so on:).
     

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