haven't and hadn't

Discussion in 'English Only' started by zerduja, Nov 15, 2008.

  1. zerduja Junior Member

    USA
    English:could you give examples of difference between "hadn't"and "haven't"?
     
  2. shiver Junior Member

    Mississauga, Ontario
    English - Canada
    Hadn't is for singular nouns
    ex. He hadn't gone to the store yet.
    Haven't is for plural nouns
    ex. They haven't gone to the store yet.
     
  3. El escoces Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    English - UK
    Hi zerjuda

    The way the forum works, as I'm sure you know, is that you can provide phrases with which you have some difficulty, and your attempt at a meaning, and other members can correct you or provide alternative suggestions. Would you like to have a go at drafting two sentences using each of these words? If you do that, I'll be happy to help you.
     
  4. El escoces Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    English - UK
    I'm afraid this is very misleading Shiver - "he" and "they" aren't nouns...and your examples use the auxiliary verb "have" in different tenses. "They hadn't gone" would, in the correct circumstances, be perfectly correct, notwithstanding that i am using "they" and not "he".
     
  5. Louidjii Junior Member

    Belgium
    French(quasi-natif)- Dutch-Belgium,Italian-Italy
    I'm sorry but I haven't and I hadn't is simply the difference of tense.

    Haven't = present perfect ex: I haven't been to the shop yet.
    Hadn't = past perfect ex : When she came home, I hadn't been to the shop yet.

    So the difference is pure grammatical.
     
  6. losilmer

    losilmer Senior Member

    The differences between "haven't" and "hadn't" are the following:

    They are simple present and past tenses of the verb to have, in the negative contracted form. The first one is for all persons and numbers (except for the third singular one, which is hasn't=has not) and the second one is for all persons and numbers.

    Exs. I haven't any cigarettes now and I hadn't any yesterday either.
    You haven't any notice of this. I hadn't lunch, so I'm hungry.
    She hasn't any idea. She hadn't any opportunity to do it last year.
    We haven't any money. We hadn't the least chance to do it three weeks ago.
    Etc, etc.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2008
  7. GreenWhiteBlue

    GreenWhiteBlue Senior Member

    New York
    USA - English
    Your question really is "what is the difference between have and had"; the n't that is attached to both is the same thing, and is a contraction for the word "not".

    Have is the present tense of the verb "to have" when used with the first and second person singular ("I" and "You"), as well as all plurals.

    I have the answer.
    You have my sympathy.
    We have a dog.
    The teachers have a meeting every day at noon.

    The past tense of this verb is "had", and it is used for all singulars and plurals, including third person singular:
    I had breakfast this morning.
    You had the last piece of toast.
    He had a good education.
    They had a wonderful time at the party.

    The present perfect tense is made by combining the appropriate form of the present tense of "to have" -- that is, either "have" or "has" -- with the past participle of the verb in question.

    The past perfect tense is made by combining the past tense of "to have" -- that is, "had" -- with the past participle of the verb in question.
     
  8. threekiddooo New Member

    Tagalog-english-korean
    i want to have a clarification with using 'hadn't and hasn't'
    please correct these sentences if there are any grammatical errors and if you may, explain further more for additional reference that i can use in the future.thanks a lot in advance.

    1. i haven't seen you in years.
    2. she hadn't seen you in years.
    3. she hasn't seen you in years.

    i'm confused when to use hasn't and hadn't.
     
  9. EStjarn

    EStjarn Senior Member

    Spanish
    Hi threekiddooo,

    Perhaps this thread could work as a starter.
     
  10. threekiddooo New Member

    Tagalog-english-korean
    thanks a lot EStjarn. i'm checking the thread now.
     
  11. Lone_Wolf Junior Member

    United States
    English-America
    Hello,

    I don't know if "hadn't" is commonly used or at least on a regular basis. I am more familiar with "haven't" and "Hasn't".

    Haven't is used for 1st person singular (I haven't gone to the store yet)

    1st person plural (WE haven't gone to the store yet) and

    3rd person plural (THEY haven't gone to the store yet)

    It is also used for second person singular AND plural such as "YOU haven't done any work today" where as the "YOU" can be singular or plural.

    Hasn't is used for 3rd person singular (SHE hasn't and HE hasn't).

    There may be a strict grammatical convention attached to the use of "hadn't" but I honestly don't know when was the last time I have heard it being used or used it myself.

    I sincerely hope I was of some help. If I am incorrect, I await to be corrected.

    Take Care All.
     
  12. Louidjii Junior Member

    Belgium
    French(quasi-natif)- Dutch-Belgium,Italian-Italy
    That sounds weird to me that you don't use that tense :-D

    Wouldn't you never say something like : "When you called me this morning, I still hadn't done anything for school"


    What else could you use than a past perfect 'Had + p.p' ??

    ;-)
     
  13. La_Saboteuse Senior Member

    American English
    The difference between "hasn't" and "hadn't" is that "hasn't" is the simple past and "hadn't" is the pluperfect/past perfect.
     
  14. Louidjii Junior Member

    Belgium
    French(quasi-natif)- Dutch-Belgium,Italian-Italy
    hasn't is definitely not the simple past !

    hasn't is present perfect. Didn't is the simple past ;-)
     
  15. Lone_Wolf Junior Member

    United States
    English-America
    I myself would use "haven't done" or "didn't do"
     
  16. ljimemad Senior Member

    Spain
    English-US
    The use of "haven't" and "hadn't" as main verbs (indicating possession) is archaic; nowadays we would say "I don't have any cigarettes now and I didn't [have any ] yesterday either." An alternative--but only in the present TIME--now--would be "I haven't got...now" We never say "I hadn't got...yesterday".

    (This archaic form was used until relatively recently--less than 100 years ago--so there are still some set phrases in which we can hear "haven't" or "hadn't" as a main verb--"I haven't a clue"--, and it is still heard in some varieties of English that are not "mainstream")

    The main confusion stems from the use of "have" as an auxiliary verb for the perfect tenses--in these cases we DO use the negative contraction "I haven't smoked at all today". "I hadn't seen that film before it was on TV", etc.
     
  17. LV4-26

    LV4-26 Senior Member

    I'm not sure (all) BE speakers would agree with that.
     
  18. ljimemad Senior Member

    Spain
    English-US
    I said that because I used to teach at the US Cultural Center, and at a meeting with teachers from the British Council (maybe 35 years ago)we asked about it because we had always thought that it was BE--much to our surprise, they said that they thought it was American...We came to the conclusion together that it was falling into disuse...
     
  19. LV4-26

    LV4-26 Senior Member

    Thanks, ljimemad.

    Strange. I distinctly remember a discussion here in which a BE speaker assured us he would quite naturally say sentences like "have you a pen?" (or whatever it was). Let me see if I can retrieve it.

    EDIT: I've found one thread although I'm not sure that's the one I was thinking of
    Anyway ==> http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1218269
    I'm particularly referring to Panjandrum's "have you any brothers and sisters?".

    Having said that, I'm willing to admit this use is fairly restricted these days.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2010
  20. La_Saboteuse Senior Member

    American English
    I think we're talking about two different things—when I said that "hasn't" is simple past and "hadn't" is pluperfect, I meant "had" in the sense of an auxiliary verb to form the past tense, not "has" as in the verb of possession.

    "He hasn't gone to the store yet" is the negative of "He has gone to the store"—which means "He went to the store" (unless my study of French has completely mucked up my native English).

    "He hadn't gone to the store yet" is the negative of "He had gone to the store" (which IS the pluperfect, if I'm not mistaken).

    Apologies if the drift of the thread was the use of "has" as in "possession."

    I'm a speaker of AE and not BE but I think that constructions like "Have you X?" or "Have you got X?" are actually pretty common.
     
  21. LV4-26

    LV4-26 Senior Member

    Have you got X? is indeed pretty common, especially (but not exclusively) in the UK.
    But I don't think it's the same for have you X?
    (see the thread I linked).
     
  22. La_Saboteuse Senior Member

    American English
    Ah, you're quite right. "Have you x" has fallen out of use.
     

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