He is a student "of / at / from" Oxford.

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Er.S.M.M.Hanifa, Apr 13, 2010.

  1. Er.S.M.M.Hanifa Senior Member

    Tamil
    Hi everybody,
    1. He is a student -at- Oxford.
    2. He is a student -of- Oxford.
    3. He is a student -from- Oxford.
    Could you please explain the difference in meanings for
    the above sentences ?
    Thanks,
    Er.S.M.M.Hanifa
     
  2. baa7ith Senior Member

    US English
    1. He is a student -at- Oxford.

    He is a student who goes to Oxford University.

    2. He is a student -of- Oxford.

    This doesn't make sense. However, "of" can be used in terms of study. "He is a student of botany."

    3. He is a student -from- Oxford.

    Either he is a student from a town called Oxford, or he is a student from Oxford University.

    "Tonight we have a guest speaker, a student from Oxford."
     
  3. Thomas Tompion Senior Member

    Southwest France
    English - England
    The standard way, among Oxford undergraduates, of saying that he is an Oxford undergraduate is he is at Oxford or he is an Oxford undergraduate or he is up at Oxford. If he's a graduate student, we'd say he's a graduate student at Oxford.

    I'm not entirely happy about Baa's He is a student at Oxford. There are so many places in Oxford for people to study, and their students are so keen to pass themselves off as going to the famous university, that I'd be suspicious.

    He is a student from Oxford could well mean he was at some educational establishment in the city other than the university. I think it would only be an appropriate form of words a long way from Oxford, like Australia.
     
  4. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    To me, "He is a student from Oxford" means that Oxford is his long-term home and that he is a student. The words do not tell us where he is studying.
     
  5. Thomas Tompion Senior Member

    Southwest France
    English - England
    Good point, SS.
     

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