He is silly to forget to bring his lunch.

Discussion in 'English Only' started by iety19, Sep 12, 2012.

  1. iety19 Junior Member

    Japanese
    Though I wrote this sentence, I'm not sure if it is grammatically collect.

    `He is silly to forget to bring his lunch.'

    In this sentence, the author judged the man silly, for the reason that he forgot to bring a lunch with him.
    The former infinitive is used as an adverb phrase, and later one is as a noun phrase.
    Can I use them simultaneously in a sentence like this?

    In the same way, can I say 'You are so honest to regret having hurt him'
    Though the later infinitive was changed in a gerund in this sentence, I guess, if the first sentence is available, it can be too.

    Could you give me advise?
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2012
  2. Tazzler Senior Member

    Maryland
    American English
    Hi,

    In my opinion the sentence needs a little tweaking. I would say "he was silly" or "he is silly to have forgotten."
     
  3. iety19 Junior Member

    Japanese
    Thanks Tazzler.
    So should I say, in the later sentence, 'You were so honest' or 'You are so honest to have regret'?
     
  4. Biffo Senior Member

    England
    English - England
    No the two sentences have two different verbs 'forget' and 'regret' that work in different ways.

    Your second sentence is correct in its original form.
     
  5. Franco-filly Senior Member

    Southern England
    English - Southern England
    I feel you need say "You are so honest for admitting that you regret having hurt him" I don't think "honest to regret" or "honest for regretting" work.
     
  6. iety19 Junior Member

    Japanese
    I'm grad to see you again Franco.
    There are significant discoveries for me in your indicates.
     
  7. Biffo Senior Member

    England
    English - England
    There are actually two quite distinct questions

    1. Is it grammatically correct?
    2. Does it mean what you intended it to mean?

    The answer to 2 is no.

    However the sentence is possible in English and is therefore grammatically correct.

    Example

    "I see that John has forgotten to bring his lunch again. He is always doing that."
    "He is silly to forget to bring his lunch. As usual he will end up watching everyone else eat."

    This is perfectly acceptable and meaningful.
     
  8. Franco-filly Senior Member

    Southern England
    English - Southern England
    In this sentence, the author judged the man silly, for the reason that he forgot to bring a lunch with him. :cross:

    I think is does mean what iety19 intended, which I understand to be: The author judged the man as (being) "silly" (= thought him silly) for the reason that (= because) he forgot to bring his lunch with him.
     
  9. iety19 Junior Member

    Japanese
    Biffo
    It is one thing to be correct grammatically and another to make sense. I see.
    I think you mean what he forgot to bring his lunch with him once isn't, as the evaluation standard, strong enough to regard him as silly, right?

    franco
    Yeah, you got my meaning right.
    In the Japanese school, we learn verbs 'remember', 'forget' and 'regret' in the same chapter. Cause they can take both infinitives and gerunds as an object.
    And we also learn the infinitive has three ways, an adverb,a noun and an adjective.
    So I had this doubt.
     

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