He was making her up for the longest time

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Mida Karato, May 20, 2013.

  1. Mida Karato Junior Member

    Italy, Italian
    Ciao a tutt*!
    Sto leggendo un libro in inglese e c'è una descrizione della routine di una coppia.
    A un certo punto si descrive quanto segue:
    "(...) He loved that car. Kept blankets over the seats to keep them spotless. Only took the blankets off when he had a date, which was every Saturday night with Baby, his Swedish girlfriend. We thought he was making her up for the longest time. They usually went to the drive-in, etc..."
    Cosa vuol dire qui il verbo "make up"? Qualcosa del tipo "pensava di rimanere/spassarsela con lei per mooooolto tempo?"

    Grazie a tutt*, di nuovo!
    Mida
     
  2. theartichoke Senior Member

    English -- Canada
    Ciao Mida Karato,

    My immediate thought on this one is that the speaker means that he (I'm assuming he's a he) and his friends thought that the owner of the car didn't actually have a Swedish girlfriend: i.e., they thought he was "making her up" in the sense of making up (inventing) a story that's not true. There's nothing else I can think of that fits the context.:rolleyes:

    "For the longest time" then would refer to how long the speaker thought this about the car owner: "For a very long time, we thought he was inventing this Swedish girlfriend of his."
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2013
  3. JasonNPato Senior Member

    GA USA
    USA-English
    I agree. This is the only interpretation that makes sense.
     
  4. CPA Senior Member

    Rome
    British English/Italian - bilingual
    Che intendesse "making up to her", nel senso di corteggiare? Cioè: noi pensavamo che fosse quella con cui aveva filato più a lungo.
     
  5. GavinW Senior Member

    Italy
    British English
    This was my thought to. In fact, I surmised that there may well be a relatively new meaning of the phrasal verb "to make sb up" (probably AE, probably youth slang) that has this meaning (ie to date sb, or to go through the preliminaries of having a relationship with sb).

    (EDIT: But I think CPA meant "making her up" not "making up to her".)
     
  6. CPA Senior Member

    Rome
    British English/Italian - bilingual
  7. GavinW Senior Member

    Italy
    British English
    Ah yes, sorry, I read your post wrong, and misunderstood the logic of your argument. The phrasal verb in question does indeed seem to have that meaning.
     
  8. JasonNPato Senior Member

    GA USA
    USA-English
    I suppose if it's in the Free Dictionary, it might have this meaning, but I've never heard this slang (in AmE).
     

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