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Hello and goodbye

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by Nineu, May 8, 2006.

  1. Nineu Senior Member

    Euskal Herria / Basque Country
    How do you say "hello" and "goodbye" in your language?
    ¿Cómo de dice "hola" y "adiós" en vuestro idioma?

    :)
     
  2. übermönch

    übermönch Senior Member

    Warum wohne ich bloß in so einem KAFF?
    World - 1.German, 2.Russian, 3.English
    I'd be also interessted in what the random greetings actually mean
    "Hello":

    "Shalom","Peace" - Hebrew
    "Hallo" - German
    "Privet" - Russian
    "Zdravstvuy","Live healthy" - Russian

    "Bye":

    "Shalom" - Hebrew
    "Tschüss" - German
    "Poka" - Russian
    "Aufwiedersehen", "Toagainsee" - German
    "Doswedanye","Untillseeing" - Russian

    Ciao & Ciao in Italian :D
     
  3. Nineu Senior Member

    Euskal Herria / Basque Country
    Thank you übermönch, could you right it in the original alphabet or that's not possible with this keyboard?
     
  4. la tierra Junior Member

    Turkish
    Merhaba:D = Hello:D
    Selam! = Hi!
    Güle güle = Bye, Hoşçakal = Goodbye
    in TURKISH!!
     
  5. Pivra Senior Member

    ...
    Thai :

    Hello/ Bye= Sawasdeeka if you are female and Sawasdeekrab if you are male.

    Good Morning = Arunsawasd
    Good Day = Divasawasd
    Good Afternoon= Sayansawasd
    Good Night= Ratrisawasd

    But only Hello, Bye, Good Morning, ang Good Night are commonly used.
     
  6. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    There was a previous thread about "hello" already. And here you'll find several translations for "bye".

    In German:
    Hello ... Hallo! (informal)/Guten Tag! (formal)
    Goodbye ... Auf Wiedersehen!
    Bye ... Tschüss!/Ciao!
     
  7. Seana

    Seana Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Hi,

    Can I add Polish greeting words?

    Hello - Cześć (It is little difficult to pronounce, isn't it? ) :D
    Goodbye - Cześć (as well )

    Sometimes I use those ones.

    Hello - Witaj
    Goodbye - Bywaj

    I give you http://www.ivo.pl/?page=syntezator_mowy_ivona
    If you want to hear it would you paste this word to Polish speech synthesizer

    Regards Seana
     
  8. crises

    crises Senior Member

    BCN
    EU Spanish/Catalan
    In Catalan:

    Hello >> Hola
    Goodbye >> Adéu / Adéu siau (polite)

    In Aragonese:

    Hello >> Ola
    Goodbye >> Adeu / Aixats / Au (col.)

    In Japanese:

    Hello >> Ohayô / Konnichi wa (col. only in daytime)
    Goodbye >> Sayonara (standard) / Ja ne (col.)
     
  9. Nineu Senior Member

    Euskal Herria / Basque Country
    I'll try in Finnish:
    Hello -> terve, hei (informal).
    Goddbye -> hei hei (informal), moi moi (informal).

    :rolleyes: This is what I remember from my travel to Finland...
     
  10. übermönch

    übermönch Senior Member

    Warum wohne ich bloß in so einem KAFF?
    World - 1.German, 2.Russian, 3.English
    yeah i've got cyrillic, but unfortunately no hebrew.
    Привет - Hello
    Пока - Bye

    Здравствуй - Hello
    Досвидания - Goodbye
     
  11. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    You just have to install it. :D

    Shalom = שלום
     
  12. Bienvenidos

    Bienvenidos Senior Member

    USA
    Afghanistan/USA
    Farsi:

    Hello: Salaam
    Goodbye: Bomona khudah, khuda hafez

    Bien
     
  13. Maja

    Maja Senior Member

    Binghamton, NY
    Serbian, Serbia
    In Serbian:

    Hello - "Zdravo", "Ćao" (Cyrillic - "Здраво", "Ћао")
    Goodbye - "Zbogom", "Zdravo", "Ćao" (Cyrillic - "Збогом", "Здраво", "Ћао")

    More formally:
    Good morning - "Dobro jutro" (Cyrillic - "Добро јутро")
    Good day/good afternoon - "Dobar dan" (Cyrillic - "Добар дан")
    Good evening - "Dobro veče" (Cyrillic - "Добро вече")
    Good night - "Laku noć" (Cyrillic - "Laku noć")
    Goodbye - "Doviđenja" (Cyrillic - "Довиђења")

    Hope this helps!
    :)
     
  14. vince Senior Member

    Los Angeles, CA
    English
    French: Bonjour (hello) Au revoir (goodbye)
    "Adieu" is the French way of pronouncing Spanish adios, Catalan adeu, which means "farewell" (literally: "to God")

    Cantonese: Nei ho (hello) Joi kin (goodbye)
    Mandarin: Ni hao (hello) Zai jian (goodbye)
    joi kin and zai jian mean the same thing as "au revoir", I'm not sure how to say "adieu" in these languages.
     
  15. Nineu Senior Member

    Euskal Herria / Basque Country
    Thank you!
    It's a work tha my little cousin has to do for school. It consist of finding the traslation of those two expressions (hello and goddbye) to other languages. He has to get as much as possible...

    Merci beaucoup, gracias, grazie, kiitos, danke, obrigada, eskerrik asko...

    :-D
     
  16. Maja

    Maja Senior Member

    Binghamton, NY
    Serbian, Serbia
    My bet! Sorry!
     
  17. Nineu Senior Member

    Euskal Herria / Basque Country
    hvala ti!!!
     
  18. Proximate Platypus New Member

    Vancouver, BC
    Canada - English
    French...
    "Hello"
    Bonjour, Salut, Allô
    "Bye"
    Au revoir, à la prochaine ("see you next [time/class/meeting]" etc), à plus (see you later), à bientôt (see you soon), à lundi / à mardi / à mercredi, etc (see you on Monday/Tuesday/Wed.)

    Japanese...
    "Hello"
    konnichiwa, haroo
    "bye"
    sayoonara (used when going away for a fairly long time), shitsurei shimasu (formal) (don't pronounce the "u" in shimasu), ja mata/ja ne/mata ne/dewa mata (later/see you later... etc.), bai bai, itte kimasu (used when you're going out... but don't say it to someone going out. Lit. "[I'll] go and come")

    In Korean I think "Hello" is "an-nyeong haseyo" or maybe it's "an-yeong haseyo" ... I forget!

    That's all I can think of...
     
  19. Maja

    Maja Senior Member

    Binghamton, NY
    Serbian, Serbia
    You are welcome!!!
    :)
     
  20. lazarus1907 Senior Member

    Lincoln, England
    Spanish, Spain
    It is probably unnecessary, but in Chinese (for those who are learning tones) it is "ní hǎo" and "zài jiàn"
     
  21. linguist786 Senior Member

    Blackburn, England
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Gujarati:

    Namaste/Namaskaar = hello
    Kem cho? = How are you?
    Bye: Pachi maila (see you later)

    Hindi:

    Namaste = Hello
    Kese ho? - how are you?
    Phir milenge = see you later
     
  22. ernesnes

    ernesnes Junior Member

    Madrid, Spain
    Gallego y Castellano
    Gallego/Galician:
    Hello= Ola
    Bye= Adeus, Atalogo, Atalogiño
     
  23. ronanpoirier

    ronanpoirier Senior Member

    Porto Alegre
    Brazil - Portuguese
    Hungarian:

    Informal:
    Hi = Szia (sing.) / Sziasztok (pl.)
    Bye = Szia (sing.) / Sziasztok (pl.) / Szervusz (sing.) / Szervusztok (pl.)

    Formal
    Hi = Jó Reggelt (Good morning) / Jó Napot (Good Afternoon) / Jó Estét (Good Evening)
    Bye = A Viszontlátásra / Jó Ejszakat (Good Night
     
  24. The MEAT Maestro Junior Member

    Missouri
    Inglese; Norte America
    In ebonics (AAVE), you would say "Yo" or "sup" for hello and "Peace" or "See ya" for goodbye.
     
  25. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    In Italian we say Ciao or Salve, e Arrivederci or Addio.
     
  26. LanceKitty Junior Member

    Philippines (Tagalog, English)
    Tagalog:

    Hello.
    Hello.

    Paalam.
    Goodbye.
     
  27. andreiro New Member

    Bucharest RO
    Romanian
    Romanian:
    Hello="Bună" or "Salut"
    Goodbye="La revedere" or "Pa"(informal)
     
  28. trisa New Member

    GREECE
    greek:

    geia sou:hello
    antio :goodbye
     
  29. gnagna New Member

    Rome
    italiano
    In italian:

    Ciao (hello & bye)
    Salve (formal hello)
    Arrivederci (formal bye)
    Ci vediamo (see us)
    Addio (farewell)

    Buon giorno/Buongiorno (good morning/day)
    Buona sera/Buonasera (good afternoon/evening)
    Buonanotte (good night)

    I add some russian too:


    Добрый день (good morning/day/afternoon)


    Добрый вечер (good evening)


    Спокойной ночи (good night)

    :)

     
  30. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    As you know, Thai and Sanskrit based languages have a lot in common. The words Ratri, Divas and Sayan are found in Hindi as Raat, Din, and Shaam...
    cool!

    Language greetings in South Asia are based on religion.
     
  31. Gandavo New Member

    Portuguese, Portugal
    in portuguese:

    hello - olá
    goodbye - adeus
     
  32. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    My entire message wasnt posted...I think I deleted it by accident! Anyway,

    Hindus say 'namaste for Hello goodbye
    नमस्ते
    They also say 'namaskaar'

    Sikhs say "sat sri akaal"

    Muslims say "Aa Salamu Aleikum" but I do not know how to write it (Im sure someone has posted already too!)
    For good bye, "khuda Hafiz" which literally means "God protect you" and is originally from Persian.

    In Punjabi, colloquial type sayins like "what's up" are: kidaan, kive ho.
    But most people just say hello. If anyone wants me to post any of these in Devanagri, Gurmukhi, or Arabic script, just let me know.
     
  33. Jhorer Brishti Senior Member

    United States/Bangladesh English/Bengali
    As panjabigator has stated language greetings in South Asia are dependent on the religion of the person.
    The Muslim greeting of course is "Assalaamu Alaikum"(I'm ashamed to confess that I'm not sure whether this is how it should be transliterated..elroy?)

    In Bengali, the only Hindu greeting is "Namaskaar"(Nomoshkaar is how it's pronounced in Bengali).. Namaste is not a bengali word. I'm inclined to believe that Namaskaar is a tatsama or direct Sanskrit loan word while Namaste must be a derived form..Don't quote me on this though.

    For farewells, Muslims use the Persian "Khuda Hafez"(as in Pakistan) but officially this has been changed to Allah Hafez(in Bangladesh) in the government's attempt to assert its Islamic identity more strongly(Most people continue to use Khoda Hafez at any rate...).

    For more neutral forms of leave-taking, one can use "Aashi"(I'll return), "Choli"(I leave), "Jaai"(synonym for "Choli" and currently replacing it at least in its use for saying one's adieus).

    Good Morning= Suprabhaat(unsure of Sanskrit based transliteration but pronounced Shuprobhaat)
    Good Night= Subha Raatri(Shubho Raatri)
    Good Afternoon=Subha Madhyanya(Shubho Modh.aanno)
    Dusk=Subha Sandhya(Shubho Shondhaa)
    Dawn= Subha Prahar(Shubho Prohor)
     
  34. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Jhorer, I think I can see the Bangladeshi dialect in your spelling. I think in Indian Bangla, the formal word for "aashi" is "Aaschi," right? And I have heard my friend who is from Chittagong speak once, and it definitely did not sound like the Bangla I have heard. I have also heard people say "Aasi" ...at least I think.

    Can you post those words in the Bangla script? I am suprised that they are said. Hindi has the same ones (Im unsure of Subh Madhyan though, however Madhya does mean middle in Hindi, ie Madhya Pradesh) but they are rarely said in my experiance. I have started saying Shubh ratri just for fun though hehe.

    I have noted a lot of people saying Allah Hafiz over Khuda Hafiz, I guess arguing over the significance of Allah over the word Khuda, and Arabic over Persian.
     
  35. Jhorer Brishti Senior Member

    United States/Bangladesh English/Bengali
    "Aasi"(pronounced Aashi, was getting bored of having to write all the official transliterations and then the real pronunciation) is the correct form. "Aaschhi"=I am coming in standard modern Bengali(But I'm happy you have an inquisitive mind). In Sadhubhaasa(Shaadhubhaasha) bengali, the form was(and still is in certain regions) "Aashitechhi" and this form was reduced to "Aaschhi" in the Calcuttan dialect(technically this form was developed from the speech of the people in the Nadia district) which is now standard in both West Bengal and Bangladesh. In the rural villages of Bangladesh, one hears "Aashitesi"(the Ch-S phenomenon I think is due to influence from Assamese). Urban people from Dhaka also speak in more or less Standard Bengali except for when they go visit their villages of birth or if they prefer speaking in their village dialect. There is a linguistic theorem that states that in rural areas/isolated areas, the language is more likely to remain static. This is definitely the case for Bengali since many rural dialects are almost completely Sadhubhaasha(except for maybe sounding melodious) with very few changes.

    The Chittagong dialect is a completely different story since that region has had a greater impact of Persian and Arabic(seafaring Arabs departed at the natural harbors of Chittagong as did the Portuguese much later). The pronunciation of nasalized vowels and aspirated consonants is also very weak in that area due to the Mongoloid/Burmese influence.. Incidentally there are many migrants living there(originally of Murshidabad/Kolkata/West bengali descent but were kicked out during Partition) who speak impeccably "well"/with a standard accent".

    Hah, It's interesting that you've started to say Shubh ratri just for fun since I've started saying Shubho Raatri also(hate all those english words that really hinder the richness of the spoken language..IMHO)..


    Unfortunately, I only have the bengali font installed for Microsoft Word and even for that I am unsure of which keys on the keyboard correspond to what respective bengali letters.
     
  36. shaloo

    shaloo Senior Member

    India
    English
    Well, telugu is language which has a lot of influence of sanskrit in it.Except that the script is devanagari, we find umpteen number of words common in both.
    For instance,

    Hello/ Good day = Namaskaaram
    Bye/ See you = Vellostaa/ Vellostaanu
    (the first one is more informal, u say it to friends,mostly)

    Good morning = Subhodayam (subha + udayam)

    Good afternoon = Subha Madhyahnam

    Good evening = Subha Saayantram

    Good night = Subha Ratri

    And I've noticed that thai also has words like we have in telugu.
     
  37. 地獄の森_jigoku_no_mori

    地獄の森_jigoku_no_mori Junior Member

    Canadian English :)(Also French)
    Well, in Canada how you say hello and goodbye depends on where you live and what language you speak :)
    In French one usually says Salut for both here. Chinese is the usuall... In English though it varies like crazy! It depends on one's mood and where one is. We usually say Hey as the greeting because we're very casual people. As for goodbye it's usually see ya or goodbye.
     
  38. Pivra Senior Member

    ...
    YESSSS, I just noticed that, lots of Sanskrit based languages use words such as Ratri, Diva, Sayan too. In Thai the terms Divasawasd, and Sayansawasd are not common anymore, during these times of the day just "Hello" alone would do.

    How about the term Nidra, instead of Ratri, any Indic language still use that?

    In thai if we say: " Nai yam nidra" "ในยามนิทรา" it means during night time.

    But Sleeping Beauty in Thai is "Jaoying Nidra" "เจ้าหญิงนิทรา" so I'm not sure about the actually meaning of "nidra" in other languages. (I'm pretty sure it is from Sanskrit)

    ps: Interesting how some Indic languages use Shubha (nice) just like how English speakers would say Good Day or Good Evening.


    ps2: In Telugu why are those words end with -m? Is it because of the grammatical declension.

    Eg. In Thai "Uday" (read oo- tdai) อุทัย means Sunrise or the east.
     
  39. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    I do not no about Nidra in place of ratri, but what comes to mind is "niiNd" which means sleep. Perhaps there is an Entemelogical connection.

    Shubh means good/nice for us to...but it really isnt used. THere is a formal way of speech and a colloquial one, and a lot of Indians speak a hodge-podge of english and their mother tongue.

    I am not an expert on South Indian languages, but I have noticed that words we share always end in a M sound.
     
  40. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    I cannot think of a one word synnonym for sun rise....the sun is "sooraj" so and sunrise would be "suuraj chadhna" perhaps?

    Poorab/poorav is east in Hindi.
     
  41. Pivra Senior Member

    ...
    Saayantra = Sunset
    Sandhaya= Sunset too I think

    For Sunrise I can only think of 2 words we commonly use in Thai

    Arun and Udai, sometimes we join them together = Arunodai. But I've never used Sooraj, this words sounds more like "Good (Virtue) King" to me, (su + raj).
     
  42. linguist786 Senior Member

    Blackburn, England
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Yes that's right. It's best written: "Assalamu alaikum"

    In Arabic: السلام عليكم

    meaning "peace be upon you"
     
  43. Helenart Junior Member

    Norway, norvegian
    In Greek:

    Hello: cherete/giasou
    Goodbye: sto kalo/giasou
     
  44. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Thanks linguist!
     
  45. shaloo

    shaloo Senior Member

    India
    English
    Pivra said:
    How about the term Nidra, instead of Ratri, any Indic language still use that?
    But Sleeping Beauty in Thai is "Jaoying Nidra" "เจ้าหญิงนิทรา" so I'm not sure about the actually meaning of "nidra" in other languages. (I'm pretty sure it is from Sanskrit)


    Well, "nidra" in telugu means "sleep" and "nidra samayam" means sleeping time(though we dont use it at all while speaking).

    Pivra said:
    In Telugu why are those words end with -m? Is it because of the grammatical declension.

    Well, im not quite sure but as i had mentioned earlier, telugu has a lot of sanskrit in it.And words in sanskrit mostly end with -m, if you observe.

    And one more thing i'd like to tell is that telugu is often called as the italien of the east.It is because all the words in telugu end with a vowel and you can almost never find a word that ends with a consonant sound.
    I hear that italien is a language that has every word ending with a vowel sound.
     
  46. ffjasmine New Member

    Indonesia
    Indonesia:
    - Hello = Halo (Informal: Hei)
    - Goodbye = Selamat tinggal

    - Good Morning = Selamat pagi
    - Good Day (11AM-1PM) = selamat Siang
    - Good Afternoon (2PM-5PM) = Selamat sore
    - Good Night = Selamat Malam
    - How Are You = Apa Kabar?

    :cool:
     
  47. Fericire

    Fericire Senior Member

    South America
    Portuguese (Brazil)
    That's interesting. Here in Brazil, a lot of people say "Salve" for "Hi". Maybe because of the Italian immigration? ;)
     
  48. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    Well, it's probable, after all 'ciao' is known and used allover the world. Anyway it comes from Latin, it is the imperative of verb salvere, which means to be well, in good health. :)
     
  49. Rallino Moderatoúrkos

    Ankara
    Turkish
    Is Servus used in in any parts of Italy? Thanks.
     
  50. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    I wouldn't say 'servus' is used in Italy, Rallino. Where did you hear it?
     

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