Hello Beautiful

Discussion in 'Русский (Russian)' started by Grefsen, Mar 21, 2007.

  1. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    I'm lucky enough to have a very good Russian friend who also happens to be a very attractive woman. :) It always seems natural for me to compliment her on how beautiful she is and so I would like to send her an SMS that starts with "Hello beautiful (woman's name)" instead of just "Privet (woman's name)."

    I believe that
    'krasivy' means beautiful in Russian so would it be correct for me to write the following to start my SMS to her?

    "Privet 'krasivy' (woman's name)"

    "Spasibo" in advance for your help.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 29, 2010
  2. Ptak Senior Member

    Moskau
    Rußland
    Privet, krasivaya...
    or
    Privet, prekrasnaya...


    P.S. 'krasivy' is male.
     
  3. Anatoli Senior Member

    Melbourne, Australia
    Native: русский (Russian), home country: English
    Haven't heard it used with the person's name, though. It sounds a bit unnatural to me. Although, "krasivaya" (красивая) is a nice word, it's not used in addressing women. Ptak's suggested "prekrasnaya" (прекрасная) is better.

    If you want to be nice, you can say: privet, dorogaya... (привет, дорогая...) - quite usual and polite (feminine for "dorogoy" - дорогой - "dear") or if you want to be really nice, say privet, milaya ... (привет, милая ...).

    Accented vowels are in bold.
     
  4. Ptak Senior Member

    Moskau
    Rußland
    That's true, but one can say "privet, krasivaya devushka [Mary]" (hello, the beautiful girl [Mary]).
    So anyway "Privet, prekrasnaya [Mary]" is better.
     
  5. User1001 Senior Member

    American English
    Hello! You may want to go with something different, perhaps along these lines: "Allo <woman's_name>. Ti znayesh...ti takaya krasivaya segodnja." (Алло <woman's_name>. Ты знаеш...ты такая красивая сегодня.) It means, "Heya <woman's_name>. You know...you are so beautiful today." Telling someone that they are beautiful *all* the time isn't going to sound as sincere each time you say it, so you should say it every now and then just so she knows that you find her attractive, and also because she'll think that you're chustvitel'naya. ;)

    Anyway, in case you do go with my suggestion, you can always substitute krasivaya with the following: nezhnaya (tender), chudesnaya (wonderful), privlekatel'naya (pretty), prelesnaya (cute), etc.

    Natives, please correct me if I am wrong with anything. :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 29, 2010
  6. Anatoli Senior Member

    Melbourne, Australia
    Native: русский (Russian), home country: English
    Little correction in spelling:
     
  7. Etcetera

    Etcetera Senior Member

    St Petersburg, Russia
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    Well, I'm not sure I would be happy to receive such an sms.:D
    My vote goes for dorogaya/milaya.
     
  8. Ptak Senior Member

    Moskau
    Rußland
     
  9. Ptak Senior Member

    Moskau
    Rußland
    But it doesn't mean "Hello, beautiful..."
    And it doesn't compliment her on how beautiful she is.
    My vote goes for "Privet, prekrasnaya...".
     
  10. cyanista

    cyanista законодательница мод

    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    I would say Привет, красавица. It sounds very idiomatic. If you put a girl's name behind it, it will look a bit uncommon (Привет, красавица Наташа) but still much more natural than Привет, красивая Наташа.

    Just my humble opinion.
     
  11. Ptak Senior Member

    Moskau
    Rußland
    Yes, I agree, it's very good and sounds natural.
     
  12. Etcetera

    Etcetera Senior Member

    St Petersburg, Russia
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    I agree with Cyanista, too.
    It's the best possible variant.
     
  13. papillon Senior Member

    Barcelona, Spain
    Russian (Ukraine)
    I also think that красавица would be the best version. If you must use it, that is...

    Maybe it's just my cynical nature, but I haven't heard anyone use such a greeting in Russian with a "straight face".

    In English, "Hello Beautiful" can be a nice innocent salutation. In Russian, an attempt to reporduce it would result in something that would normally be said tongue-in-cheek, as in:
    О, привет красавица, явилась не запылилась,
    and such.
     
  14. cyanista

    cyanista законодательница мод

    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    I was cynical enough to have thought about it too. :D But I figured the sarcastic meaning was heavily dependent on the tone and/or the context (as in наша красавица опять запорола график or ну что, красавица, признание писать будем? :p ) so I wouldn't expect any tongue-in-cheekness in a friendly message, moreover, coming from a foreigner.

    P.S. If I were a platonic admirer I would probably write something like "как поживаешь, свет очей моих". :) :)
     
  15. Stephanus New Member

    Stockholm, Sweden
    Sweden English
    Perhaps she would understand "Ciao bella!"
     
  16. palomnik Senior Member

    Vietnam
    English
    Perhaps it is slightly sarcastic, but I remember seeing the movie Funny Girl with Barbara Streisand dubbed in in Russian when I was a student in Leningrad back in the seventies. In the opening scene of the movie, Fanny Brice looks at herself in a mirror and says "Hello, Beautiful!" In the Russian version she said "Алло, красавица!" It works for me.
     
  17. Ptak Senior Member

    Moskau
    Rußland
    Yes, "привет, красавица" is a little tongue-in-cheek (sometimes), but "привет, красавица [woman's name]" is absolutely ok, without any ironical sense.
     
  18. Etcetera

    Etcetera Senior Member

    St Petersburg, Russia
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    I'm not so sure about the absense of any irony here...
     
  19. Ptak Senior Member

    Moskau
    Rußland
    If I get an SMS from my foreign friend, who doesn't speak Russian, that starts with "Привет, красавица [my name]", I'd NEVER find any ironical sense in it!
     
  20. papillon Senior Member

    Barcelona, Spain
    Russian (Ukraine)
    If you have to use a name, you can switch the order of words. Though Привет Наташенька-красавица sounds a bit folk-tale-like (think the Russian Byliny) it is, IMHO, quite pleasant.
     
  21. Etcetera

    Etcetera Senior Member

    St Petersburg, Russia
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    Well, indeed!:) I must confess that I happened to forget about the sender.:)
    But maybe our discussion will be useful for other learners of Russian.
     
  22. margo16 Senior Member

    germany,german
    When my boyfriend sends me an email, he usually starts his letter with 'Привет, красавица!"Здесь нет никакой иронии. Все зависит от контекста.
     
  23. scriptum

    scriptum Senior Member

    Israel
    Israel / Hebrew, Russian
    I would strongly recommend “привет, красотка!”. The phrase sounds a little bit weird, but that’s what makes it really effective. Always unexpected, it throws the woman off her guard. When I was young, I tried it several times, almost always with success. Eventually, one of the girls even married me.
     
  24. Etcetera

    Etcetera Senior Member

    St Petersburg, Russia
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    Красотка has certain connotations in Russia since the famous films starring Richard Gear and Julia Roberts. I wouldn't recommend to use this word when addressing a woman...
     
  25. Ptak Senior Member

    Moskau
    Rußland
    It sounds rather unceremoniously.
     
  26. cyanista

    cyanista законодательница мод

    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    I wouldn't be delighted at being called красотка. :eek: It sounds casual and slightly vulgar. My associations: a fast-driving car screeches to a halt in front of you and a sleazy guy shouts, Ну чё, красотка, прокатимся с ветерком?

    Yuuuk!
     
  27. Ptak Senior Member

    Moskau
    Rußland
    These are my associations too :))))
     
  28. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    Yes, it looks like you are having an interesting discussion, but please remember that some of us who are just learning Russian don't understand the Cyrillic alphabet. Even if I did understand Cyrillic it currently isn't possible for me to send SMSs using Cyrillic. :(

    In any event, I decided to go with the suggestion made by Ptak of "Privet, prekrasnaya..."
    I'm seeing my beautiful Russian friend this afternoon so I guess I'll be getting some feedback about my SMS then. :)

    "Spasibo" to everyone for all of your help.
     
  29. Etcetera

    Etcetera Senior Member

    St Petersburg, Russia
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    You're welcome, Grefsen.
    And good luck to you both.;)
     
  30. Anatoli Senior Member

    Melbourne, Australia
    Native: русский (Russian), home country: English
    Start learning Russian and start by learning our alphabet, then you will really impress her :) No, you probably can't use Cyrillic letters in SMS in the US but you will be able to romanise words.

    There are different standards, choose one from this table.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanization_of_Russian#Transliteration_table

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_language#Alphabet
     
  31. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    "Spasibo" for all of your excellent suggestions Anatoli. :) I have used both "dorogaya" and "privet, milaya" in emails and SMSs sent to another very beautiful Russian female friend of mine and I'm happy to say that I received very positive feedback afterwards. :cool:

    Doesn't "dorogaya" basically mean "dear" while "milaya" means "sweet" in English?
     
  32. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    Actually she would, but she is always much more impressed when I use Russian words and expressions. :)
     
  33. Etcetera

    Etcetera Senior Member

    St Petersburg, Russia
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    You're right.:)
    My Russian-English dictionary also suggests translating милая as 'dear' if it's used to address someone.
     
  34. Crescent

    Crescent Senior Member

    England
    Russian, (Ukraine)
    Hi, Grefsen! :)
    Personally, I would translate ''милая'' as ''sweetheart'' - sounds a little bit more affectionate that way, doesn't it? :) Just like the russian term originally does. :)
     
  35. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    'Privet' Crescent! I'm sure you can probably guess who I sent the SMS to. :)

    I have to tell you too that this very beautiful Russian friend of mine was very impressed with my SMS. :cool:

    "Spasibo" again to everyone for your help. :)
     
  36. Q-cumber

    Q-cumber Senior Member

    A bit on the side
    Russia/Russian
    In fact, the word "Алло" is used in phone conversations only. It means something like "Yes?... listening!"
    In a personal converstion it sounds kinda unpolite. In that case it means kinda: "Hey, you!!!"
     
  37. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States

    I’ve been using "Privet, prekrasnaya..." in most of my emails and SMSs to my two very beautiful Russian friends for several weeks now and have received very positive feedback especially in the beginning. I’m wondering now if I need to be a bit careful about using this word too much or is it not possible to say “prekrasnaya” too often to a Russian woman. :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 29, 2010
  38. I would however, be quite circumspect about using such forms of address. That really depends on how much of a friend she is and what kind of a friend. Generally, such phrases tend to sound rather frivolous if not vulgar in certain circumstances.
     
  39. Q-cumber

    Q-cumber Senior Member

    A bit on the side
    Russia/Russian
    I suggest that your personal qualities caused the positive feedback, and not the word "prekrasnaya". :D
    1. "prekrasnaya" is an adjective, not a noun. It shall be used in a pair with a noun...well, perhars this is not an absolute rule, but in the most cases it is true.
    2. The word itself is somewhat outdated in modern Russian. It sill is widely used, yet in such expressions as "прекрасная погода" ("Fine (excellent) weather "), "прекрасная возможность" ("a fine opportunity "), "прекрасная работа" ("an excellent work") and so on.
    3. "prekrasnaya" is very seldom used in an address. It might be a part of some fixed expression: "Привет, о прекрасная незнакомка!" (Privet, o prekrasnaya neznakomka!) "Hello, o beautiful stranger!" <female only> Such a phrase always suggests a bit of irony and might be used in order to cheer up an unfamiliar girl.
    4. In any case, I advice you against using the word more than once per person, if you know what in mean. :) Otherwise, she might get bored soon.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 29, 2010
  40. rara20 New Member

    English
    hi everyone! reading this, i was just wondering what krasavitsa (alone) means if you are seeing the person who is saying it? i.e. what is the difference between what a "player" says, and what a guy who is serious about you says? if anyone's still there and gets back to me that would be great :) i speak quite good russian and i look up what the affectionate words mean, but i don't have any cultural context, how it is perceived by russian people?
     
  41. slavic_one

    slavic_one Senior Member

    Prague, Czech Republic
    Croatian (štokavski, jekavski)
    Am not a native speaker, but would also go without a name.

    But you can say that to someone if you see the person, not with sms :)

    "красавица" means "a beauty".


    And what about хорошенкая?
     
  42. Pyccak Junior Member

    Russian
    If you are good friends than the correct translation of: "Hello beautiful" is "Привет красавица."
     

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