helpful to vs. helpful for

Discussion in 'English Only' started by bmo, Feb 12, 2009.

  1. bmo Senior Member

    Taiwan
    1. It will be helpful to you.
    2. It will be helpful for you.

    Is the second 2 incorrect?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Alaor Santos

    Alaor Santos Senior Member

    Curitiba, Paraná, Brasil
    Portuguese Brazil
    This will be helpful to you.
    It may be helpful for you to discuss...
     
  3. bmo Senior Member

    Taiwan
    Thank you very much, I get it.

    bmo
     
  4. sanjree New Member

    English
    The first sentence is correct, and inspite of using It will be helpful to you, you can use it may be helpful to you.

    By using the MAY, you are giving choice to the person; whereas, WILL stands for the direct suggestion
     
  5. bmo Senior Member

    Taiwan
    Thank you very much.

    bmo
     
  6. HSS

    HSS Senior Member

    Sendai, Japan
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    You wouldn't say 'It will be helpful for you' at all?
     
  7. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    HSS

    If you will check, you'll see that sanjree never submitted another post and this one was a year ago. I seriously doubt he or she will read your response.

    I suggest you ignore the submission.

    I hope this is helpful.
     
  8. HSS

    HSS Senior Member

    Sendai, Japan
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Hi, sdgraham.
    Oh, actually I meant 'anyone' by 'you' in my question. Would you say 'It will be helpful for you'? I have this feeling that there is a little subtlety involved here. With 'to,' I feel, 'being helpful' is seen more subjectively whereas with 'for' more objectively. Would you say 'for,' and would there be any difference?

    Hiro
     
  9. jillyqi Junior Member

    Chinese
    << --- threads merged here --- >>

    This would also
    be helpful for scholars.
    This would also be helpful to scholars.
    Can "for" and "to" replace each other in the above sentence?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 10, 2014
  10. Beryl from Northallerton Moderator

    British English
    Neither is impossible, but further context may inform a native speaker's choice of preposition. Do you have any further context?

    eg. What does 'this' refer to, and in what way might it be deemed helpful?
     

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