1. cooladilla Senior Member

    Spain (Spanish)
    Hi,
    I have some trouble using hence and thus... I have the impression that they are interchangeable, but I'm not sure, could you help me with the following sentences, please?

    - Along with linguistic knowledge, the students should develop the skills necessary for autonomous learning, and work in collaborative activities. HENCE/THUS, this methodology will help the pupils to learn how to learn.

    - Teachers will provide a context to make them familiar with the cultural aspects of English speaking countries, HENCE/THUS developing sociocultural competence.

    - These activities are very useful to raise the pupils' awareness of certain patterns that may be important for them to learn. HENCE/THUS, the new input should help them to place the elements they are learning into the context of what they already know.

    - To do so, I have created remedial activities in order to cater for learning diversity. HENCE/THUS, the students who are above and below the general level of the class will be given an answer to their specific needs.

    I know it's a lot, but I just need somebody to tell me which one I should use each time. Thanks very much in advance!
     
  2. spodulike

    spodulike Senior Member

    Brighton, England
    English - England
    The real difference is in their origins I guess.

    "Hence" means "from here"
    "Thus" means "in this way"

    If you try replacing "hence" and "thus" in the above with these phrases you may detect the slight difference in meaning.
     
  3. sugarwhirl89 New Member

    English - England
    Hi, sorry for posting a response to such an old thread. I just want to make a clarification so that anyone else looking for an answer to this question will not be confused:

    Thus = In this way
    Whence = From here
    Hence = From this

    Unfortunately since 'hence' and 'whence' are pronounced in the same way (unless you're with the Queen or someone equally posh, who will then pronounce 'whence' as 'hwence'!), it is easy to get the meanings mixed up!

    Thus and hence are used pretty much in the same way nowadays as a synonym to therefore. The main difference used to be the grammatical usage - thus is followed by past/present tense, while hence is followed by future/conditional.
    To illustrate:
    Vicky defeated Rebecca in the final match, thus winning the cup.
    Vicky defeated Rebecca in the final match, hence she will be awarded the cup.

    *edited to add grammar clarification.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2012
  4. inib

    inib Senior Member

    La Rioja, Spain
    British English
    I don't understand why you say this. I pronounce hence with an "h" and whence with a "w". I agree about the Queen though :)
     
  5. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Whence = de/desde donde
    Where = donde
    Whither = a donde

    From here = hence
    To here = hither

    As they do in North America, as well.
     
  6. Xay New Member

    Spanish
    Hello,

    I still don't understand how to use thus and hence. Could anybody tell me which of these sentences are correct?

    "The amount of potentially hazardous objects is gradually reduced, hence the security of present and future missions is increased."
    "The amount of potentially hazardous objects is gradually reduced, thus the security of present and future missions is increased."
    "The amount of potentially hazardous objects is gradually reduced, hence increasing present and future missions' security."

    "It would mean a significant change in this field as it would guarantee the mission's safety, thus saving a lot of precious time and energy." "It would mean a significant change in this field as it would guarantee the mission's safety, hence saving a lot of precious time and energy."

    Thank you!
     
  7. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Welcome, Xay! :)
    En general, "hence" (de aquí que ...) se refiere a una condición que ya se ha creado, mientras que "thus" (y en consecuencia ....) al resultado de algo que se va a hacer.
    Según mi criterio personal:
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2012
  8. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    I would avoid the word "hence" if possible, even though it can be quite correct in many contexts. "Thus" or "therefore" are usually more natural. "Hence" is a fine word but it has become rather antiquated or literary, at least in the US.
     
  9. Xay New Member

    Spanish
    Muchísimas gracias aztlaniano, tu respuesta me ha sido de lo más útil! :)

    Thanks Chris K. I know hence can sound rather antiquated but I am writing a formal text and I thought it could be a good replacement for thus or therefore as I had already used both in previous sentences. Thank you anyway for your help!
     
  10. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    In this kind of context I would use something like "as a result" or "for that reason."
     
  11. aztlaniano

    aztlaniano Senior Member

    Lavapiestán, Madrid
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Tienes una opción más, que podrías usar hablando de algo cara al futuro, que es "thence" (de allí que ...).
    Se usa hoy día aún menos que "hence", pero no estaría fuera de lugar en un texto formal.
     

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