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Hereafter referred to as

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by LaFilleRevolte, May 18, 2007.

  1. LaFilleRevolte New Member

    USA, English
    how would one say "hereafter referred to as" as in when refering to a piece of literature in an essay "'Les deux rois de Mali' (hereafter referred to as 'Les deux rois'"?
    could I say "en future s'appelle 'Les Deux Rois'"?
     
  2. LARSAY Senior Member

    Hanoi, Vietnam
    BI-NATIONAL FRENCH-ENGLISH.
    First, it should be "hereinafter", not "hereafter". The translation is dénommé(e)(s) ci-après..............For example La société J.B.Construction, dénommée ci-après le CONSTRUCTEUR,.............................
     
  3. LARSAY Senior Member

    Hanoi, Vietnam
    BI-NATIONAL FRENCH-ENGLISH.
    One addition: dénommé ci-après is the term used in legal documents. In your example, it might be better to say appelés ci-après "Les deux rois" (attention: the first character of every main word of a title is capitalized in Englsih, but not in French, which explains why I did not capitalize the "d" and the "r' of "deux rois")
     
  4. Nicomon

    Nicomon Senior Member

    Montréal
    Français, Québec ♀
    "hereinafter" is more legal... but "hereafter" isn't wrong, imo, and works fine in context. For French, (as a personal preference) I would write it backwards ... ci-après appelée or even skip "referred to" altogether and simply write « ci-après "Les deux rois" »
     
  5. broglet

    broglet Senior Member

    England - English
    I agree that 'hereafter' is fine and it is slightly less archaic in feel than 'hereinafter'. But as with 'hereinafter' it tends mostly to be used in legal or formal documents. Nowadays even legal documents tend not to bother with it.

    You used to see in contracts ".. Fred Bloggs (hereinafter referred to as 'the Vendor') ..." but now it is more likely to be written " ...Fred Bloggs ('the Seller') ..."

    Could you do that in French too, omitting even the 'ci-après'?
     
  6. Nicomon

    Nicomon Senior Member

    Montréal
    Français, Québec ♀
    I never thought of it, but indeed, you could even omit "ci-après" :)
     
  7. edward1529 Senior Member

    United States--English
    Est-il possible de dire aussi, parce que l'on ne parle pas ici de quelque chose juridique: "À partir de maintenant, [cette oeuvre] appelée "Les deux rois..."?
     

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